The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 26, 2005

A Topic Everyone Talks About
I have a trademark habit that always causes my adult children to roll their eyes. I ask people, including many strangers, "What is your favorite vegetable?"After that, if the person is game, I proceed to, "What is your favorite way to eat potatoes?"...
Calder Drew in the Air
Alexander Calder's reputation - for all his continuing recognition - has possibly suffered in the same way that an actor can sometimes be remembered exclusively for a popular role. His invention and imaginative development of "mobiles" - often entertaining...
'Cultural Diplomacy' Is Key to Winning Hearts and Minds
Over the years, the United States government has targeted a string of foreign individuals destined for greatness and brought them to America to be steeped in the culture and ways of Americans, and be exposed to the strengths and weaknesses of the American...
Deciding to Let Go in Autumn
Until just a few days ago, the fall foliage season around Boston has been largely in our heads. Normally we think of the colors of autumn as hitting their peak around Columbus Day. (Wasn't it convenient for New England's tourism business that Christopher...
Dutch Design Lets Homes Float on the Floodwaters
'God created the earth," says an old Dutch saying. "but the Dutch created the Netherlands." Indeed, precious few nations share the distinction of having forged much of their land from the sea.After hurricane Katrina flooded the Gulf Coast, many US hydrologists,...
Egalitarian Finland Most Competitive, Too ; despite Hefty Government Spending on Social Benefits, Finland Tops Global Economies. Second in a Three-Part Series
Fifty years ago, Finland was known for little more than the wood pulp from its endless forests. A poverty-stricken land of poorly educated loggers and farmers on the edge of the Arctic Circle, few paid it any attention.Today, this small Nordic nation...
Exploring Opposite Ends of the Artistic Spectrum
In addition to the various schools and movements associated with art, it's worth remembering that there are also various objectives. In some cases, the artist's goal is to make you think about social issues. In others, to appreciate the beauty of nature....
FBI Infractions since 9/11 Raise Civil Liberty Concerns ; Newly Released Documents Point to Hundreds of Possible Violations of the Laws Governing Surveillance
On Sept. 26, 2002, a Special Agent in the FBI's Pittsburgh office had an "uh oh" moment, according to newly disclosed bureau records.The agent had been in continual contact with a potential counterintelligence source since March. But under FBI rules,...
How the Fed Is Run, and What It Does
Ben Bernanke has been nominated to hold what is arguably the world's most influential seat of financial power. Yet the job of Federal Reserve chairman is also little understood. Here is a primer on the nation's central bank:Why does the Federal Reserve...
In Wilma's Wake, Sighs of Relief ; Two Florida Towns Directly in Hurricane's Path Fared Better Than Predicted
This was supposed to be ground zero. But you'd never know it, talking to residents of this remote, low-lying community at the northern edge of Everglades National Park.Dead in the path of hurricane Wilma, with a predicted 12- to 18- foot thrust of seawater...
Is God Mad at Us? ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life
That was a startling question asked recently on a national news broadcast.A reporter noted this year's hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, and fires, and raised the question, Are these natural disasters - these "acts of God," as they are sometimes known...
Letters
In Syria, the threat of force will accomplish more than sanctionsRegarding the Oct. 24 editorial, "Bush's tipping point with Syria": It's ridiculous to say the US is "militarily exhausted" by Iraq. American forces are intact and are, fortuitously, adjacent...
Life Changes for Katrina Evacuees ; for One Family Airlifted from New Orleans to New England, Decisions about Starting over Have Shifted as the Reality of Their Situation Sinks In
As hurricane Katrina bore down on New Orleans in August, Constance Essex helped transport prisoners to safer locations before she herself evacuated with co-workers to Houma, La.She stayed for nearly three weeks before reuniting with her parents, brothers,...
Modest Hero, Civil Rights Icon ; Rosa Parks Quietly Sparked a Revolution
Rosa Parks, who died Monday in Detroit, symbolized the unsung heroines who kick-started the Southern civil rights movement. Ever quiet and unassuming, Mrs. Parks passed decades in near-anonymity before her single act of civil disobedience on a segregated...
NASA Discovers Interstellar 'Chocolate'
To solve the mystery of life's origin, scientists can no longer focus solely on Earth. They must take the entire universe into account. Reason: the discovery of nitrogen-carrying aromatic hydrocarbons throughout the universe.Prior to their recent discovery...
NBA Players Cry Foul over New Dress Code
LOS ANGELES - Philadelphia 76er Allen Iverson says it's "not good for the league, because it makes it fake."Orlando Magic's Grant Hill says, "Personally, I like it. I like to dress up."Indiana Pacer Stephen Jackson calls it "racist."What the three high-profile...
Next Fed Chief: Smartest Ever?
When he wasn't studying economics at MIT, Ben Bernanke, nominee for chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, might have been cheering on the Red Sox at Fenway Park.And when he wasn't studying in high school - he scored a 1590 on his SAT - he was All-State...
Reporters on the Job
* Finnish Touches: Reporting in a small country like Finland, where people know each other and are also friendly, is often easier than working elsewhere, Peter Ford found in Helsinki. Looking for the building where he had an appointment one morning,...
Russia, China Looking to Form 'NATO of the East'? ; A Six-Member Group, Seeking to Balance US Power, Meets in Moscow Wednesday
Russia and China could take a step closer to forming a Eurasian military confederacy to rival NATO at a Moscow meeting of the six- member Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) Wednesday, experts say.The group, which started in 2001 with limited goals...
The Immovable Rosa Parks
There was the individual stand for freedom taken by Rosa Parks - defying Jim Crow laws of segregation by refusing to yield her bus seat to a white man. And there was the nascent civil rights movement of the 1950s, just waiting for someone of her courage...
The Ties between Disaster Aid and Politics ; Influential Lawmakers and Election Politics Play a Sizable Role in Directing Federal Help to States, Research Shows
When President Bush declared Florida a disaster area this week in the wake of hurricane Wilma, the need was clear - a major hurricane inflicting significant damage to a heavily populated state.But when it comes to smaller-scale floods, fires, tornadoes,...
What the US Death Toll in Iraq Reveals ; A New Poll Shows That 53 Percent of Americans Say the War Wasn't Worth It
Sometime in the coming days, the United States military will probably report the 2,000th American military death of the Iraq war.While in some ways an arbitrary milestone, the tragic figure only tells part of the story when it comes to the human costs...
Why Your Dog Is Smarter Than a Wolf
At Eotvos Lorand University's Department of Ethology, visitors are usually greeted not by a security guard, but by a delegation of friendly mongrels, tails wagging. Dogs have the run of the place. They play in classrooms, visit faculty members in their...

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