The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 19, 2004

An Olympic Score to Settle: Who Revived the Modern Games?
Most true sports fans know that the Olympics were brought back to life in Athens in 1896 by the enthusiastic young Frenchman Pierre Fredy, better known as the Baron de Coubertin.In the 110 years since the Parisian baron founded the International Olympic...
A Self-Rule Test at Iraq Ministry ; Cash and Expertise Boost Health Ministry Even as Doctors Face Kidnapping and Threats
From the look of its freshly renovated offices, and on paper, Iraq's Ministry of Health appears to be the successful poster child for US plans to hand back control of Iraq to Iraqis.Salaries for health workers have increased and hospitals are being refurbished....
As We Forgive ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
What have I done? At one time or another we all face the fact that we've done something wrong and need forgiveness for it.Nearly two years ago, I felt this keenly. I longed to be forgiven for something I had done that turned out very badly. I prayed...
Beaten Biscuits, Fried Dill Pickles, and a Battlefield in Mississippi
It was the beaten biscuit machine that led us astray. The plan was to dash into the Old Court House Museum, look around, maybe pause for a moment at the last will and testament of Mrs. Jefferson Davis. Instead, we emerged an hour and a half later, having...
Burma Temples in Red Brick ; Archaeologists Are Aghast at Efforts to Rebuild Ancient Bagan
For centuries this vast plain of temples has cast a spell over visitors to Burma (Myanmar), long after its imperial reign faded into history. Built using slave labor during two and a half centuries of dynastic rule, Bagan became a byword for Buddhist...
Bush Anti-Castro Beat Goes On
If Iraq is understandably the current focus of the Bush administration's foreign policy, the president is not overlooking an irritant in America's backyard, namely Cuba and its communist leader, Fidel Castro.President Bush has just taken steps to stiffen...
Can Torture Be Justified? ; at Hearings Wednesday, the Senate Armed Services Committee Will Question Top Army Officers on Interrogation of Prisoners in Iraq
Shortly after the Taliban were routed in Afghanistan, President Bush warned of the major danger now facing the United States: "Shadowy terrorist networks."Speaking to newly minted officers at West Point, some of them headed for combat in Iraq, their...
Constable: A Stubborn Lover of Green Hues
In his "Memoirs of John Constable," C.R. Leslie recounts several telling anecdotes about the English landscape painter's "discourse" - sometimes involving amiable disagreement - with connoisseur Sir George Beaumont.As a collector, Beaumont had introduced...
Fortune 500 and the Uninsured
Tired of waiting for Congress to agree on how to cover the 43.6 million Americans without health insurance, big business is taking matters into its own hands.Over 50 Fortune 500 companies - household names like IBM, Ford, Sears, and McDonald's - are...
Gandhi Bows out, Taps Reformer ; Sonia Gandhi Turned Down India's Top Slot Tuesday, While Her Party Signaled an Agenda of Moderate Reforms
Even though Sonia Gandhi has shocked everyone by refusing to become India's next prime minister, her victorious Congress party has studiously sent calming signals to investors and the public that it will not be setting a radical agenda.After Mrs. Gandhi...
How FBI Is Remaking Intelligence Functions ; Bureau's New Intelligence Coordinator Says US Doesn't Need a British- Style MI5 Agency for Domestic Spying
Since Sept. 11, 2001, no government agency has come under more searing criticism for not foreseeing the terrorist plots against America than the Federal Bureau of Investigation.That scrutiny has already led to a massive reorganization effort within the...
In Failing Schools, How Real Is Transfer Option?
Last year, Jesus Uriostegui was eager for his daughter Citlalli to transfer out of Richards Career Academy, her failing high school on Chicago's southwest side. Under federal law, he and other parents with children in failing schools can request transfers...
In Spring, It's Easy Seeing Green
What is the color of spring? Green, of course. A fresh, new green. Green for "go." But how many greens are there in nature? The more I look, the more I see. Green, nature's ubiquitous background, is restful and accommodating as no other color is. Its...
Israel Looks to Secure Gaza Prior to Pull out ; the Israeli Army Launched a Major Offensive into the Occupied Territory Tuesday, Killing 18
The Israeli army launched a massive military campaign in the southern end of the Gaza Strip Tuesday, killing 18 Palestinians - seven of them armed, it says. Israel is gambling that the upshot of an aggressive foray to cut off the flow of weapons from...
Letters
Reforming campaign finance needs mobilized votersRegarding your May 17 editorial "Undone Campaign Finance Reform": The Monitor is wrong to deem the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (BCRA) a success and incorrect to say that the soft-money race is on again...
Orchestrating the Digital Living Room ; Can Entertainment Devices Really Talk to One Another? It's an Appealing Idea, but
You're watching the "Friends" finale on TV when you remember that you're waiting for an urgent e-mail. No need to get up. You set the TV to record, switch the screen to the Internet, and respond to your message. After watching the rest of "Friends,"...
States' Rights Momentum on Court May Be Waning ; Justice O'Connor Played Key Role in Two Cases That Suggest Limits to the Federalism Revolution
Only a few years ago the US Supreme Court seemed bound and determined to recast the balance of federal and state power by sharply limiting the ability of Congress to infringe on the sovereign authority of the states.For the first time since the New Deal,...
The Hijacked Locomotive That Drove into History
The story of the General, a locomotive that was stolen on two occasions - almost 100 years apart - is a tale of war, spies, a long- distance chase, the first Congressional Medals of Honor, and an ownership battle that ended up in the lap of the US Supreme...
The Second Battle of Chancellorsville ; Preservationsts Try to Keep Chancellorsville as It Was in 1863
On the back trails of the battlefield at Chancellorsville, there are places where time seems to have stopped, where May 1863 seems just a few steps around the next bend of a road.Visiting here, you can easily conjure up images of the Confederate victory...
They Change Diapers and Perceptions
Jennifer Lind was 18 and the president of her senior class when a little plastic square in a home pregnancy test turned pink, changing her life forever. It confirmed her suspicions that she was pregnant.Goodbye, college plans. Hello, brave new world...
To Fix Foster Care: Reform Courts, Funding
Listening to the stories of foster care changes you forever. A foster parent speaks fiercely of her love for the children she adopted from foster care. A mother cries, recounting how she overcame addiction to be reunited with her child. A college student...
Trading Up
They'll never receive a badge of courage for it, but European Union leaders and President Bush have stuck their necks out lately to expand global free trade.On a campaign swing through key Midwestern states, Mr. Bush tried to convince voters - many of...
What Went Wrong in New York City on Sept. 11
They are searing questions that New Yorkers have been asking since Sept. 11: How prepared was the city, and how did it respond?Now, with the benefit of three years of perspective and countless hours of interviews and videotape, the 9/11 commission is...
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