The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 8, 2004

Advice to Innovators: You Really Fail Only When You Quit
The striking thing about the innovators who succeeded in making our modern world is how often they failed. Turn on a light, take a photograph, watch television, search the Web, jet across the Pacific, talk on a cellphone. The innovators who left us such...
A 'Moral Voter' Majority? the Culture Wars Are Back ; Exit Polls Stir a Debate over the Role of Morals - and Religious Values - in the Nation's Politics
With the largest vote in US history, it's become clear that a lot of folks in the heartland, now in the majority, have morality on their minds.Yet as moral values topped the exit polls as "the issue that mattered most" to voters, some in the blue states...
A Muscle Car Gets a Classy Touch
For drivers who have grown tired of aerodynamic jellybean-shaped sedans, check out the Chrysler 300. From its scowling headlights to its narrow windows to its high, short tail, the 300 stands out in today's crowded automotive market.Chrysler hopes its...
An 80-Mile Swim - with Hubcaps
Sitting in the front seat of his beat-up Acura, Christopher Swain squeezes into his wet suit on a chilly November morning getting set to swim yet another six-mile chunk of Boston's mighty Charles River.Mighty? Well, mighty dirty, according to this clean-water...
Anti-French Mood Roils Ivory Coast ; Mobs of Government Supporters Looted French Businesses and Attacked French Nationals Sunday
The smoldering civil war in Ivory Coast - a two-year, on-again off-again conflict between the government and northern rebels - began looking more like a battle between France and its former colony over the weekend.French troops - deployed last year as...
Arizona as the New Canvas for Exurban Mega Growth
In the shady Old Town of this Sonoran Desert outpost, visitors might be hard pressed to identify which country - and which decade - they are in: carnecerias (meat shops), stone churches, radiator shops, and street-front movie theaters abound.Blocks away,...
Bush's Foreign Priority
After promoting freedom in many nations, President Bush finally has found his own.He won a second term and freed himself of political pressures to be reelected. And having been the post-9/11 "war president," he's become schooled enough in the ways of...
Driving My Daughter to Distraction
Robin climbs out of the car, runs around it once, and gives me the thumbs-up. She hops up and down with joy and gets back in. Yep, she can get the car into a parking spot, and she's master of the universe. I love teaching my kid to drive, and it turns...
Dutch Debate a 'Values' Divide after Slaying
The murder of a controversial Dutch filmmaker has reenergized an uncomfortable debate over Europe's relationship with its growing Muslim minority.Theo van Gogh, whose latest work cast a critical spotlight on Muslim treatment of women, was gunned down...
Early Lines on Bush's Next Cabinet ; at Camp David, the President Weighed What Could Be a Slow but Sweeping Shuffle
President Bush has enjoyed extraordinary continuity and loyalty from his cabinet. Now, a second term won, the personnel shuffle will soon begin - though not all at once. Over the next few months, and probably well into next year, expect a steady stream...
For Illinois Farmers, a Record Harvest ; with Mild Weather and a Bountiful Fall, There's Just One Problem: Where Can They Store So Much Grain?
On the 800 acres John Sutter farms just east of Bloomington, rich black soil now appears below the remnants of corn stalks, the product of fresh tilling. The barn by his parents' sagging Victorian farmhouse is shut, the combine put away for the season.Mr....
High Stakes of Taking Fallujah
As US Marines mass outside the tough Sunni Triangle town of Fallujah, analysts believe the imminent high-profile attack in Iraq carries high political risks.The US says a principal motivation behind retaking Fallujah, considered the center of the insurgency,...
'Inverted Utopias'
Between 1920 and 1970, a Latin American avant-garde movement promoted the belief that artistic works could present possibilities for a form of utopia, and function as a pattern for an improved society. During those 50 years, the manner for expressing...
Kerry Joins the Also-Ran Club
Kansas is home to its share of obscure attractions and museums: The world's largest ball of twine in Cawker City. The Oz Museum in Wamego. The official site of Little House on the Prairie near Independence, with a replica log cabin painstakingly reconstructed...
Letters
Replies to European worries about second Bush termIn response to the Nov. 4 article "Global memo to Bush: Be involved, but not bossy" I composed this letter.Dear Europe:I am a working-class man. My father emigrated to the US in 1960. I have close roots...
Maybe a Democrat Can Win in the South ; the Region Looked All but Impregnable for Bush. but Some Say the Right Democrat Could Make Electoral Inroads
On this tiny crossroads along a fading Tobacco Row, a visitor from the North can get a quick glimpse into why the Democrats are losing ground in the struggle for the region's hearts and minds.After President Bush's sweep of the South, some commentators...
Moving after 23 Years: What Are the Capital-Gains Consequences?
Q: My husband and I built our own home 23 years ago, spending less than $120,000. We are thinking of moving west and believe that we can sell our property for $700,000 to $800,000. We figure it will cost us $10,000 to $15,000 to move. We have about $300,000...
My Illustrated Son ; Virgil Sang 'Of Arms and the Man.' but He Never Dreamed of the Arms One Soldier Returned Home With
Forty years ago as I sat in Sister Agnes Clare's fourth-period Latin class translating Virgil's "Aeneid," little did I dream that words from that epic war poem would one day come in handy in reading my son's arms.Words like bellum and pacem. "War" and...
Really Grateful? ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
When I got back the pictures from our summer vacation and looked through the first several shots, I was shocked to see how exhausted and sad I looked. But then, it had been a difficult year.I had been assigned to a new school where colleagues refused...
Red States Won - Now the Red Ink
President Bush appeared quite cheery at his press conference last week. But that glow will be tested in the months ahead as he faces the task of putting America's fiscal house in order after four years of massive tax cuts and rampant overspending.Everywhere...
Reporters on the Job
* Print Reaction: "Even before it's begun, the siege of Fallujah is getting bad press in the Arab world," reports Dan Murphy (see story). "City under Siege," was the caption in Al-Ahram, Egypt's major government-owned daily, next to a photo of a bloodstained...
Small Town, Big Hearts: A Shelter from the Storm
As a lifelong resident of a metropolitan area on the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, I'd grown used to the annual series of scares and near misses that the hurricane season brings. But this time it was different. This time there was a Category 4 storm raging...
The Gradual Goodbye ; A Growing Number of Workers Want to Retire One Step at a Time. So Can You - If You Avoid the Hidden Traps
Seven months before Ken Klein retired last year as a project manager, he went to his boss with a modest proposal: He wanted to ease into retirement by working a four-day week. His employer agreed, allowing him to compress 40 hours into four 10-hour days,...
US Heading into Major Urban Assault in Iraq ; More Than 10,000 US Forces Are Poised to Attack and Occupy the Rebel Operations Base
Dust-coated US forces are encircling the Iraqi rebel stronghold of Fallujah, awaiting final assault orders, as insurgents dramatically escalated their own attacks elsewhere in the Sunni triangle over the weekend, leaving more than 50 dead.American aircraft...
When Rain Didn't Come, Our Neighbors Came Through
Water is the lifeblood of a farm. Without reliable rainfall or a source of irrigation, our farm suffers. This spring our ponds and ditches swelled over their banks. Wood ducks floated on sun-warmed puddles that shimmered in open fields. I watched a great...
Why Taxpayers May Steer in New Direction
Some people - the smart ones - think about tax-saving strategies throughout the year. Others wait until it's too late - April 15. The rest of us think about them in the last couple of months of the year.So, with 53 days left in 2004, here's a timely...
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