The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 21, 2005

A New Place to Go after a Disaster ; West Virginia Is Setting Aside Housing for Victims of Local Floods - or National Emergencies
The image of sodden, downtrodden New Orleans residents picking up the pieces of their lives from a wrecked Gulf and inhabiting cruise ships and hotels is a black mark on the American zeitgeist.Survivors of a future national emergency may make a beeline...
Artist Gives Data a Global Dimension
For artist, designer, journalist, and sometimes educator Ingo Guenther, disillusion and innovation are inextricably linked.Frustrated by what he sees as the news media's sensationalist perspectives and art's sometimes idealistic and impractical approach...
Backstory: In St. Paul, Putting Less Heat on the Homeless ; in a Novel Move, Police and Social-Service Providers Team Up to Find a Better Way to Deal with Those on the Street
Sgt. Paul Paulos hasn't been on duty 10 minutes when some disturbing activity on a street corner catches his attention. He quickly pulls a U-turn on a cold night in downtown St. Paul.A man in a red jacket is passed out next to a battered radio and a...
Banned in Biology Class: Intelligent Design ; Teaching the Theory in Public Schools Violates Constitution, Judge Rules
"Intelligent design" is just another name for creationism - and therefore teaching it in public schools violates the constitutional principle of church-state separation.That is the bottom line from the decision in perhaps the biggest courtroom clash...
Bright Lines and the Search for Certainty
I surmise that I'm not the only one hoping for some clarity on United States policies regarding detainees in Iraq or the war on terror.When I punched the phrase "bright line" along with the word "torture," into Google, I got 46,100 hits. For a very rough...
Can the Government Spy on Citizens without a Warrant? ; at Issue: Whether Presidential Power Trumps a 1978 Law Requiring Court Oversight of Domestic Espionage
President Bush's decision to allow the super-secret National Security Agency to spy on Americans without court warrants has touched off stormy debate about his aggressive approach to the war on terror.This clash - between civil libertarians and the administration's...
Done Everest. Next: Earthquake Relief ; Mountaineers Are Helping to Locate and Bring Aid to Pakistan's High- Altitude Earthquake Survivors
With no road access and few spots for a helicopter to land easily, the Machiara Valley in northern Pakistan had yet to see any relief supplies for two months after the devastating earthquake.That changed when a team of mountaineers traversed remote valleys...
Entrepreneurs Log the Unwanted Urban Forest
Donald "Stubby" Warmbold remembers the day he saw a 100-year-old oak tree cut into 12-inch lengths of firewood. A new homeowner in suburban Mercer County, N.J., wanted to expand a driveway, so the tree had to go."It was a beautiful, beautiful red oak,"...
Find the True Value of Higher Education
The recent survey of compensation for college presidents was met with a resounding thud. The Chronicle of Higher Education reported last month that for the first time ever a college president - in fact, five of them - earned more than $1 million in a...
Fra Angelico's Art Reassessed ; A New Exhibition Brings to Light How His Influence Continues to Be Felt
Her lovely face, so solemn with its heavenly charge, radiates spiritual intelligence as well as tender humility. Mary and the announcing angel, Gabriel, share a golden ground, their faces illuminated by damask. Gabriel looks directly at her; she looks...
Heigh-Ho! It's off to Work New Yorkers Go
They came by foot - most in sneakers; by cab - often quadrupled up; by bike - bundled against the cold; and by train - with standing room only into Manhattan. On the first day of the first major transit strike in 25 years, most New Yorkers made it to...
Iraqi Vote Points to Islamist Path ; Early Returns Reveal That Shiites and Sunnis Opted for Religious Parties
Stretching newfound democratic muscle upon their first chance to elect a full-term government, Iraqis overwhelmingly threw their support behind religious parties defined along sectarian lines and ethnicity.A bloc of Shiite religious parties close to...
'I Won't Be Home for Christmas' ; Millions of Americans Will Celebrate a 'Holiday for One' Away from Family. Many Find Ways to Cherish the Spirit of the Day
Growing up in a close-knit family in Singapore, Desiree Koh cherished the Christmases she spent with her parents and brother. Even after she immigrated to the United States nine years ago as a college student, her family joined her in Chicago for the...
Marching through the History of West Point
At a little more than two centuries old, the United States Military Academy at West Point is known around the world for turning out famous - and infamous - military leaders. But few people know that West Point graduates are also responsible for such...
Netanyahu Takes over Likud ; the Former Prime Minister Sets about Rebuilding the Conservative Party Ariel Sharon Just Left
After his decisive win in the Likud party election Monday, Benjamin Netanyahu takes over the party that has run Israel for most of the last 30 years. But he grabs the reins at a time when Likud is in a shambles, and few give it a chance of beating Prime...
Now I Can Watch My TV from Anywhere on Earth
As a Boston Red Sox fan, I'm obsessed with seeing every inning of every game. So last year, I subscribed to a new service offered by Major League Baseball that let me watch live baseball games on my computer. For about $100, I could watch almost every...
On Capitol Hill, Pre-Christmas Presence Is a Lump of Coal
Don't tell Senate majority leader Bill Frist, but the joke running around the Capitol support staff - worried they'll have to work right up until the holiday weekend - is that he's "the Frist who stole Christmas."The source is an otherwise cheerful Capitol...
On the Horizon ; News from the Frontiers of Science
Drought and snails fell marsh grassOver the past six years, the US East and Gulf Coasts have lost salt marshes at an unprecedented rate. Scientists blame drought and increasing soil salinity as the main culprits. Now an international team of researchers...
Peace to Every Yearning Heart ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life
Do you ever wonder what it was like to be there that night? To hear the glorious promise sung by the angels: "On earth peace, good will toward men"?I've wondered about their Christmas message of peace. Did humble shepherds feel that tender tranquility...
Public Unions on Trial in the Big Apple
New York's transit workers, even though their strike hit the city hard before a holiday, are at least doing the nation a favor. They've revealed the desperation of powerful public-sector unions to hang on to unsustainable benefits and workplace rules.The...
Reporters on the Job
* Just Wait: Pilgrims visit Iran's Jamkaran mosque daily, but Tuesday night is the biggest show, says staff writer Scott Peterson. He arrived for prayers at dusk, but there were none of the "hundreds of thousands" he had been told to expect. After taking...
The West's Patience Wears Thin with Iran's Hard Line
When European nations resume talks with Iran in Vienna Wednesday over that country's nuclear ambitions, two dangerous new factors are in play. On the one hand, the patience of the Europeans and the United States with Iran is running thin. On the other...
Transit Strike's High Stakes ; Other Unions and Management Teams Watch to See How New York Negotiates Wages and Key Benefits
It's a collision America is seeing more often: Management tries to have workers move back their retirement age and pay more for healthcare, while workers try to keep their benefits and make up for lost ground on wages.This labor-management clash forced...
Waiting for the Rapture in Iran
For those who believe, the devotion is real. Tears stream down the cheeks of 2,000 men ripe for the return of the Mahdi, the 12th Imam they expect will soon emerge to bring justice and peace to a corrupt world.Eyes stare upward and arms open wide to...
Where Are the Voices of College Presidents?
Here's a quiz for you. Name the presidents of any three of America's 4,000-plus colleges and universities.Odds are most readers flunked that quiz, but it wouldn't be fair to take points off anyone's grade. How could the public know the names of higher...
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