The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 28, 2004

Al Qaeda's Uzbek Bodyguards ; as Pakistan Rounds Up More Al Qaeda Operatives in Its Cities, Hundreds of Uzbek Fighters Remain in the Tribal Hills
Pakistani forces have scored a number of recent successes in ferreting out Al Qaeda operatives from cities and towns across the country.The latest operation took place over the weekend in the southern town of Nawabshah, where Pakistani forces reportedly...
Cheaper vs. Cleaner: Big Differences
Consider two recent news items: oil prices creeping up toward $50 a barrel and Antarctic glaciers breaking up into icebergs at an accelerated pace, probably due to global warming.They may not seem related. And with war in Iraq and the economy topping...
Concrete Evidence ; This Building Material Is Everywhere, Now. but It's Been Everywhere, Too - and It's Still Going Places
It's an early Wednesday afternoon. Mark Butler is on his second delivery of the day. But he's not bringing milk or delivering mail. Mark drives a huge truck with a large spinning drum on the back. Tumbling around inside it are tons of liquid concrete.This...
Cookies and Curriculum ; House Parties Invite Grass-Roots Discussions on National Education Policy
In MaryBeth Ingberg and Dennis Vail's living room, the conversation is getting heated. It's not so much that 25 people gathered here disagree, but that they all care passionately about the topic at hand: education."The schools here are deteriorating...
Electoral Battleground Is Shifting ; Bush Has Strengthened His Hold on Some States Recently in Play, Leaving Florida, Once Again, in a Pivotal Swing Position
When the locations for the presidential and vice presidential debates were first selected, all were in states expected to be among the most competitive battlegrounds in the nation: Florida, Missouri, Ohio, and Arizona.Yet with the debates now fast approaching,...
'Footprints on the Sands of Time' ; in Search of Forgotten Longfellow, Once the World's Most Popular Poet
Tongues all over the world once recited the poetry of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Students use to memorize "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere" and lines from "Evangeline" and "Hiawatha." Longfellow's literary reputation once rivaled that of Tennyson and...
French Choirs Crescendo as Hit Movie Inspires Singers ; 'Les Choristes,' a Postwar Reform-School Drama about the Power of Song to Redeem Wayward Teens, Is Making Choir Cool in France
AS soon as I have finished writing this I will have to dash off: can't miss choir practice.I would never have expected such a statement to elicit glances of admiration and even envy from my neighbors, but in France this autumn, singing in a choir puts...
He Feels Democratic but Votes Republican
Back in my undergraduate days at Canisius College in Buffalo, one of the campus ministers used to marvel at the fact that I was a registered Republican.He was a Kennedy Democrat and, clutching his hair in angst, would repeatedly ask: "I know you ......
In New England, a City Revival Built on Creativity
When Nat May graduated from college, it was not his hometown in southern Maine that beckoned. Instead he left for Asia, with plans to learn Mandarin and become a translator of ancient Chinese texts.When he returned to the US, Portland was only to be...
Iraqis Wary as School Year Starts ; Six Million Students Are Expected to Begin School Saturday in a Key Test of Security
Khadija Ali Mijaual plans to greet children and parents at the front gate of the Nejib Pasha elementary school this Saturday, just as she has done every first day of school for the past 17 years she's been principal.Along with her optimism for the learning...
Latest Tax Cuts Are Not a Wash
One might think that passage of a $146 billion tax cut just before an election in which tax cuts are a big issue might have stirred up angry campaign sound bites about its effect on the deficit. Not so. The reason? Both Democrats and Republicans in Congress...
Letters
Anti-Bush sentiment in the military: news fit to print?Our family was deeply disappointed in the editorial decision to print the Sept. 21 article "A strident minority: anti-Bush US troops in Iraq," which highlighted anti-Bush sentiment in the military....
Lucky Lindy, Unfortunate Jews ; in Philip Roth's Alternative History, Charles Lindbergh Beats FDR
Once again, Philip Roth has published a novel that you must read - now. It's not that an appreciation of his book depends on the political climate; our appreciation of the political climate depends on his book. During a bitterly contested election in...
Palm Reading Dressed as Science ; Millions Take Personality Tests Every Year, but Are They Valid?
A recent radio ad for E-Harmony promotes a personality profile based on 29 dimensions that all but guarantees finding a perfect mate. But don't sign up until you read Annie Paul's well- researched, highly informative, and rather scary portrait of the...
Philadelphia's Church-School Experiment
Paul Vallas has been spending Sunday mornings in the pulpit recently, but he's no preacher. As CEO of the 210,000- student School District of Philadelphia, he's been speaking at weekend services in houses of worship across Philadelphia, extolling the...
Press 'Fairness' in Politics: Just Relativism Disguised?
It is en vogue for politicians to rail against relativism these days. In a world that seems more dangerous and complicated than it has been in decades, campaigns like to offer people an anchor, to say they stand for something solid.Relativism, with its...
Reporters on the Job
* I'll Ask the Questions, Thank You: They are called man-on-the- street interviews, the kind designed to gauge what is called vox populi, the people's voice. But a reporter doing them can sometimes find the tables turned, with the man (or woman) on the...
Stock Markets Move Logically - except When They Don't ; Fractal Geometry May Finally Explain Financial Risks
Don't be surprised while reading "The (Mis)behavior of Markets" if you find yourself asking, "When it comes to risk, does anybody on Wall Street know what they're talking about?"The answer is a little chilling. Despite decades of research, no one has...
Storm Season's Second Phase Not Far Away ; Atlantic Climate Often Shifts in October - Good News for Florida but Not for Caribbean
By almost any human measure, the 2004 hurricane season has brought enough exasperation and destruction to fill an entire decade. By the unforgiving eye of science, however, this year's hurricane season still has more than two months to go.As Jeanne spun...
The Case of the TV Trouble ; for Kids
Mom was away, and I was in charge. My three younger brothers and my sister were running around acting goofy. I wanted to watch TV. Yanking and pushing the TV cart across the uneven floor, I hit a bump, and over the TV went. CRASH! Everyone ran to see...
The Fall TV Season and the Presidential Race
Just as I did in 2000, I thought it might be worthwhile to see what the new season's crop of shows might have to say about the presidential election.Some signs are a bit bleak for the incumbent. Last year, fresh off the apparently accomplished mission...
The Race to Iraq's Election
Given the level of violence in Iraq, it's hard to dismiss UN Secretary General Kofi Annan's recent observation that it will be impossible to hold credible elections there "if the security conditions continue as they are now."And the administration doesn't...
Too Often, Teachers Extinguish a Student's Spark
I had painted "lollipop trees." At least, that's what my elementary school teacher said.Our assignment was to paint watercolor landscapes. I painted trees with round tops, modeled after the pruned trees I saw as I walked to school each morning. I liked...
When Students Grade Their Teachers ; an Online Service Riles Some - but Others Say It's Only Fair to Turn Tables
When Eric Piotrowski wonders what his high school English students think of him, he simply logs on to RateMy- Teachers.com, where millions of anonymous teacher critiques await anyone with an unrestricted Internet connection.At the site, a smiley-faced...
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