The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 9, 2007

A Gift from the Berry Patch
As new parents living far from relatives, my husband and I once found the warm shelter of family where we least expected it, in a Southern berry patch. It was only for an afternoon, but that afternoon was as brilliant and comforting as a slice of blueberry...
Don't Be Surprised by Surprises
An old saying claims, "There's nothing new under the sun." Whenever you're faced with a difficult situation, it's reassuring to think that someone else in the world has already confronted the same dilemma and found a solution.I hate to pop anybody's...
Electric Cars in Big Sky Country?
"So here's a guy in a diesel," says Ron Gompertz, looking over his shoulder at the truck looming next to us. It's not really necessary to look, because the growling diesel engine is nearly drowning him out."You wanna drag?" he asks me.The question is...
It's Not Where You Live, but Where Your Heart Is
I have never met the older Scottish couple walking toward me on the cobbled street - yet I feel as though I have known them forever.A facial tissue peeks from one sleeve of the woman's cardigan, and the man wears a tweed jacket and tartan tie. His arm...
Korean Film Revives Tragic - and Fading - Memory
The memories flash back in a rush of images: kids flinging rocks at policemen in a typical antigovernment display that I witnessed one sunny May day in 1980 in Kwangju, the restive center of the Cholla region in southwestern Korea. When I returned two...
Lessons from Wimbledon
To call the 2007 women's Wimbledon winner the underdog might be a bit of a stretch. After all, this is Venus Williams's fourth Wimbledon win - meaning she was hardly short on experience, or credentials, going in. Yet, when Williams won against Marion...
Letters to the Editor
A gas tax can efficiently reduce the use of fossil fuelAs the June 5 editorial, "Al Gore's Inconvenient Tax," points out carbon taxes are both regressive and unpopular, even if they were to take the place of Social Security taxes.However they are also...
Live Earth Concert: Was Its Message Heard?
With an estimated broadcast audience of 2 billion from 130 countries, Saturday's Live Earth concerts may have been the largest media event ever. But for former Vice President Al Gore, the driving force behind Live Earth, the concerts are but the springboard...
Markets Exceed Modest Expectations
"Gee, what a pleasant surprise!" That's what many stock fund investors are likely to exclaim when they pore over their midyear statements in the coming weeks. Despite market jitters in June, when a sudden jump in long-term interest rates and leveraged...
Obstacles Ahead for Missile Defense
- You'd think deployment of US missile defenses in Europe was imminent, given the way Presidents George Bush and Vladimir Putin sparred over the subject at last week's "Lobster Summit" in Kennebunkport, Maine.Despite the goodwill generated by speedboat...
Ocean 'Highway' Rerouted for Right Whales
Instead of frolicking and feeding in the middle of a dangerous ocean "highway" filled with massive cargo ships with sharp propellers, endangered humpback whales named Echo, Owl, Glo, and Pepper now find themselves on a much safer shoulder.In a first-of-its-kind...
Pakistan Zeroes in on Zealots
When the violent strand of Islam eventually collapses of its inherent contradiction, that day may have been foreseen in the siege at Pakistan's Red Mosque. If the military uses wise tactics to end the siege well, civilization will be the victor.The standoff...
Quietly, US Strategy in Iraq Shifting
With little fanfare, at least so far, the stage is being set for a post-"surge" Iraq strategy that reduces US ambitions for the Iraq project, even while keeping some US forces there for years to come.No decisions have yet been made, and administration...
Service Work Props Up US Job Market
The US economy is now being powered by educators, healthcare workers, front-desk clerks at hotels, and anyone who can ask, "May I help you?"Demand for workers in the service sector is hard to sate. Online job postings are full of ads looking for hair...
Sun-Scorched Phoenix Takes More Heart for Its Homeless
Bottles of water don't last long these days at the Lodestar Day Resource Center in downtown Phoenix. One homeless person after another grabs an ice-cold bottle, untwists the cap, and drains it in an instant."That's so good," says Nicholas Travis, who...
The Poor Need Help, Not Hidden Taxes
A government needs revenues. So what does it do? It taxes the poor. That happens too often, says Michael Davis, a senior fellow at the National Center for Policy Analysis (NCPA) in Dallas. "It's politically expedient."The poor don't vote in elections...
Tony Blair's Palestinian Pickle
As the British would say, using that slangy phrase that conveys puzzlement, incredulity, and grudging admiration, it "takes the cake."Having lost support and the prime ministership for embarking on a difficult war in one Arab country, Iraq, Tony Blair...
Too Few Men Hunting Al Qaeda
A Sunni tribal sheikh was on the phone. Sixty Al Qaeda fighters had returned to a nearby village Friday. Could the Iraqi Army commander in western Diyala Province please send help?The militants had been chased out just 10 days ago by Iraqi forces, who...
Turkey's Kurds Still Prepared to Fight
Sultan Koyun says she cries as much for fallen Turkish soldiers as for killed militants of the Kurdistan Worker's Party (PKK). For the first half of this story, published June 6, click here.But as a Kurdish member of the "Mothers for Peace" group in...
With US Help, Money Flows in Pakistan
To Faiz Paracha, manager of corporate sales at Suzuki Motors, the past few years have been astounding.The national numbers are plain enough: Two consecutive years of 8 percent growth and sales of cars and electronics that are increasing by 50 percent...
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