The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 17, 2008

African Tales for American Kids
If you're a kid who likes stories with lots of action and adventure, then you'd love the ones told by Won-Ldy Paye (pronounced Von De Pay-ee), a storyteller from the West African country of Liberia. He uses masks, dolls, and colorful backdrops to make...
Airlines Are Charging for the Wrong Bags
Flying with luggage this summer? It's going to cost you. Last week, United Airlines and US Airways joined American Airlines in charging for even one checked bag. Additional bags cost more."With record-breaking fuel prices, we must pursue new revenue...
China's Massive Postquake Tasks
Now comes the hard part.The Chinese government has won plaudits at home and abroad for its quick and efficient response to the earthquake that devastated large parts of Sichuan Province one month ago, leaving 85,000 people dead or missing.Bringing the...
EmbracingBurma's Orphans
A recent headline in this newspaper asked, "How many orphans in Burma?". The story pointed out that in Burma (Myanmar), records are minimal and surnames not used. While it's not easy to know if a displaced child was actually orphaned by cyclone Nargis...
Europe's Unfinished House
Board by board. Nail by nail. Building a wider and more united Europe is a laborious process that's been going on for nearly 60 years. Uniters mustn't get discouraged when construction is interrupted, as it was by Ireland last week.Quite firmly, Irish...
Gay Marriage: A New Bind for Church Groups
The same-sex marriage march begins across California Tuesday, with thousands of gay couples expected to wed in the coming weeks. But some notes of discord and rebellion can already be heard above Pachelbel's Canon.Several county clerks have said they...
How a Group of California Teens Won a National Science Bowl
Ingo Gaida's classroom at Santa Monica High School is striking on two counts: First, for a biology class, it is remarkably devoid of life-forms, with the sole exception of a pint-sized goldfish named "Beast 6." Second, the air is filled with the drone...
How a Kenyan Village Tripled Its Corn Harvest
The dry months of April, May, and June were once equated with hunger for Agre Ranyondo and his neighbors in this community of 55,000 people.Mr. Ranyondo, a farmer, waited for the rains to come before he could plant corn on his six-acre plot. Often the...
How Clinton and Obama Boosted Feminism, Civil Rights
The race between Barack Obama and Hillary Rodham Clinton may be over, but its effects on the broader movements for racial and sexual equality in America are likely to be felt - and debated - well past the fall.Senator Obama's victory roused blacks who...
How Green Is That Product?
Stroll around a typical home-goods store and you might feel as though you're walking outdoors - everything is turning green. Over the past year, more mainstream companies have jumped on the green bandwagon, unveiling "natural" cleaners, recycled products...
In Chicago, Talking Sense to Angry Young Men with Guns
Marnell Brown's phone rang an hour before midnight. A 17-year- old youth had been shot and killed not far from his office in West Garfield Park, one of Chicago's poorest and most violent neighborhoods. Some of the teen's friends were gathered a few blocks...
Iraqi Interpreters: Hope Rises to Go to U.S
In war, love tends to blossom quickly. Just three months after Sarah and Chris met in Baghdad, they were married. Now, three years later, they hope to raise a family in America, far away from the sectarian violence and turmoil that they witness every...
Kosovo Serb Policeman Looks to Future
In the wake of Kosovo's new Constitution, Serbs in central Kosovo enclaves spoke of distrust of Albanians, said their homes were for sale, and lamented a decent future for their children. For-sale signs were pasted up alongside posters of Serb nationalists...
Letters to the Editor
Chicago residents concerned about 2016 OlympicsRegarding the June 6 article, "A contender, Chicago mulls cost of 2016 Olympics": Not all Chicagoans are enthusiastic about holding the Olympics here. In particular, the longtime residents of the South Side...
Love in the Summer Stock Wings
Who doesn't dream of just one more book by their favorite author - a sequel to "Stuart Little" buried in E.B. White's Maine barn, say, or news that Harper Lee has been sitting on a follow-up to "To Kill a Mockingbird" all these years? So a new novel...
New Legal Fight over U.S. Antiterror Tactics
Four days after handing the Bush administration a major setback in its approach to the war on terror, the US Supreme Court has set the stage for another showdown over controversial antiterror policies.On Monday, the nation's highest court agreed to decide...
Tensions as Kosovo Inks Constitution
A new Kosovo Constitution signed Sunday represents another milestone for the disputed nation in the heart of the Balkans.But this next step toward legitimacy for the 90 percent Albanian state, while applauded by the European Union and the US as a step...
The Death of U.S. Strategy in Iraq
John McCain has set off a firestorm by suggesting that the timing of the withdrawal of US forces from Iraq is "not too important." What is important, he said, are the casualties in Iraq, pointing to long-term US troop presence in Japan, South Korea,...
Understaffed Fed Raises Worries
Just when the economy most needs the help of capable policymakers, America's central bank finds itself short-staffed.The predicament: Where the Federal Reserve is supposed to have seven members on its board of governors, it now has five. A recently announced...
What, People Managed before Computers?
About 400 years ago, a guy named Wilhelm Schickard made the world's first computer. It was bulky machine that looked like an oversize typewriter, and it could add and subtract six-digit numbers. It was difficult to operate, was ridiculously expensive,...
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