The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 21, 2004

A Cabin That Welcomes the Season
Our farm's log cabin can get pretty hot in July and August, but it's a fine place to be in Indiana's autumn. Set in a ring of sugar maples, it has an aura of permanence - a quiet solidity and plain- faced appeal that forgives long absences with an unassuming...
Airbus-Boeing Culture War
The United States has launched a major economic dispute with Europe, taking the biggest trade complaint ever to the World Trade Organization (WTO) for litigation.The stakes are enormous, involving the world's No. 1 and No. 2 civilian aircraft makers...
Along Tobacco Row, a Changed Culture ; A Federal Move to End Subsidies and Offer a Buyout Plan Will Aid Big Growers and Cause Smaller Ones to Give Up Their Fields
Tony Lee and Billy Massengill grew up with the musky scent of ripened tobacco dabbed on their necks and arms like a pungent "eau de leaf." As kids, they remember sleeping in their fathers' barns amid the curing leaves - a rite of passage in an area where...
Breaking Free ; New Plans Would Use New Technology to Make the United States Energy Independent
Ray Kopp enjoyed tooling around in a hydrogen- powered Honda prototype vehicle so much that, for a moment, he pictured driving one home.Then Mr. Kopp, an economist at Resources for the Future, remembered the car's price tag - $1.5 million - and his hopes...
British Try to Sway Ohio Swing Voters ; Europeans Seek Voice in High-Stakes Election
As an undeclared voter living in the critical swing state of Ohio, James Chapman is accustomed to intense appeals from the presidential campaigns. But on Tuesday, the Springfield resident received a handwritten letter urging him to support John Kerry...
Close Eye on a Closer Race ; Monitors - Foreign and Domestic - Flock to US to Check Fairness of Vote
From an armored car crawling the streets of Algeria to an election commissioner's seat in East Timor, Horacio Boneo has overseen the voting process in more than 60 nations. Now, he has a new challenge: evaluating the fairness of America's elections."In...
Cuban Trade Embargo? Not for Vermont Cows. ; amid Debate over Trade Sanctions, a Little-Known Exception Allows Farm Exports, like Apples and Milk
They share a rural identity - one is a spread of rolling farms, the other of tropical plantations. They boast of their collective resourcefulness - one endures the harsh winters of the Northeast Kingdom, the other the unreliability of ancient cars and...
Egypt Keeps New Parties on Short Leash
It's another Wednesday night in Cairo's poor Bab Al-Sharaya neighborhood and legislator Ayman Nour is leading one of his weekly party meetings, where Egypt's old-style culture of political patronage and the yearnings for democracy of a shrinking middle...
Getting a Clearer Read on Stars
On a broad mesa 12 miles southeast of Flagstaff, Ariz., astronomers are testing the notion that when measuring some of the brightest stars in the sky, six eyes are better than one.The mesa is home to a unique array of telescopic "eyes" - light- gathering...
Global Legal Trends Make Waves at High Court ; on Issues Such as Juvenile Death Penalty, the Court Considers Whether It Should Weigh International Opinion
A few minutes into the oral argument over the juvenile death penalty last week at the US Supreme Court, Justice Anthony Kennedy posed a question. He wondered whether significant international opposition to juvenile executions should influence how an...
How Things Are Made
It's easy to overlook the effort that goes into making common consumer products. And while we may take for granted that the construction of a commercial airliner is a fairly complex process, we're less likely to see the creation of something as ubiquitous...
I'm Suddenly in Tune with Trumpets
A clarion call... Not the figure of speech, but a single mellow, sustained trumpet tone outside my window gets me to my feet. It's not the first time I'm up this morning, but this time it's final. I've just been awakened all the way through.I was early...
Legal Wars Stirring over Election 2004 ; Concerns about Voter Enfranchisement and the System's Integrity Have Lawyers Busy Already
For weeks, reports of potential trouble have been trickling in from around the country. There are the suspicious - or clearly fraudulent - signatures on voter registrations. There are the allegedly unreliable electronic voting machines, controversies...
Letters
Foreign influx not sole cause of US programmer troublesThe Oct. 14 article "Endangered species: US programmers" is right on the mark. I am a programmer who has worked for top US software firms. I see explicit H-1B hiring preferences, rampant age discrimination,...
Mexico's Answer to Tight School Budgets: Teaching by TV
It's Monday, a school morning, and 14-year-old Manuel Damian is glued to the television. He's not playing hooky and he isn't feeling ill. In fact, the ninth-grader is sitting quietly in class, his blue school sweater buttoned up against the chilly mountain...
Nasty Politics? Puhleez! Get a Historic Grip. ; US Politics Is Exasperating - Always Has Been. but through the Calumny and Distortion, We've Selected Decent, If Not Always Excellent, Presidents
"Let's step on them!" exhorts the early 1950s Republican election poster hanging in my basement. It features the party's pachyderm with his foot planted squarely on two squirming figures, one a mustachioed Stalin look-alike labeled "Communism," the other...
New Breed of 'Kremlin Capitalism' ; as the Battle over Oil-Giant Yukos Ends, the State Tightens Its Grip on an Industry Once Dominated by Private Firms
As the end heaves into sight for Russia's beleaguered oil giant Yukos, experts say the year-long battle over its fate has squelched market forces and put the Kremlin firmly in charge of the economy's commanding heights.But there is little agreement over...
Oregon Tries New Tack in Fight against Meth ; More States Consider Limiting Access to Cold Medicines That Are Used to Create Methamphetamines
Speed. Crystal. Ice. Glass. Crank. Tweak. Zip. It goes by many names, but methamphetamine - also known as "the poor man's cocaine" - is one of the most devastating drugs in the country today.It's easy to make using legal chemicals found in hardware stores...
Politics Invade the Cinema ; the Unprecedented Deluge of Politically Charged Films Raises Ire This Election Year. but Will the Movies Actually Sway Any Voters?
Never in American movie history has politics - and partisan rivalry - invaded the local cineplex as dramatically and contentiously as in Election 2004. Call it the silver screen's version of "reality" TV.Politically charged documentaries have drawn unusually...
The Chasm of Rich Nation, Poor Nation
You could call it unfair, and in the long run, unwise. The institution charged with managing the world's international financial system is badly out of whack with economic reality.Rich nations run this institution, the International Monetary Fund. Poor...
Time to Trade a Lakeside Hammock for a Wing Chair by the Fire
We are milking the last days of fall here in Vermont. Each morning my sister wraps her woolen bathrobe tight and darts outside the 1920s-era "camp" to retrieve the morning paper. Every evening the peach sunset shimmers a minute earlier than the day before.Today...
'What the Bleep.!?' ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Movie critics in the United States have been reviewing a recent film with an unusual title. This is also a film with an unusual focus: quantum physics and the power of thought.Two articles in the Oct. 14 issue of this newspaper, "Small film, large questions"...
Where Physics Meets Faith
For those seeking spirituality in physics, there's wisdom in an old song lyric: "You can't get to heaven on roller skates 'cause you'll roll right past those pearly gates." It also puts into perspective the buzz surrounding "What the Bleep Do We Know!?"...
Wired, but Everyone on Hold
It's an axiom of our times that the more technology lets people reach out to the world, the less they want to be reached.They surf websites without registering. They set up filters to defend their e-mail accounts from spam. Some 64 million households...
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