The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 10, 2004

A Remake without a Cause
Nearly 20 years have passed since "The Stepford Wives," a movie about men who surreptitiously replace their uppity wives with robots who look identical to their spouses. Well, almost. The "new and improved" housewives supposedly conformed to the male...
Bush Team and the Limits on Torture ; Recently Disclosed Memos Justified Harsh Treatment in Principle
The shock of the Sept. 11 attacks was so great that the US government was willing to consider doing almost anything - including actions previously thought morally suspect - to prevent another such catastrophe.That may be a bottom-line lesson of recent...
China Hums with Change
We climbed to the 10th level of the ancient wooden Pagoda of Six Harmonies here, and the views all round were stupendous. To the west rose mist-smudged mountains in the valleys of which nestled the tea gardens that produce China's most sought-after green...
Condo Neighbors Make My Spirits Gallop
Next-door to my condo complex is a horse farm that sweeps down from wooded hillocks to wetlands that overflow into low-lying pasture. It's a juxtaposition that affords me no end of delight as I take a midmorning break from my dining-room-table desktop.Part...
Dad Would Be Proud - Shank's Mare Is My Choice, Too
I think of my father, a cowboy rancher of the old school, every dawn when I set out on my walk. Watching us board the "yellow monster" bus to ride the mile to school each morning, Dad would grumble, "Mark my words, those girls will lose use of their...
'Euro-Fatigue' Threatens Turnout in Continental Vote ; the Four-Day Election for a 25-Nation European Parliament Begins Thursday. Polls Indicate That Voter Turnout May Be Low
Ask a European about the moment of history taking place across the Continent this week, and you get a puzzled response. The D-Day anniversary? A gay marriage in France? The start of the Euro 2004 soccer championships?Actually it's the biggest transnational...
For Bush, a Good Week ; between Iraq, the Summit, and Reagan's Passing, Kerry Has Been Effectively Sidelined
In some ways, the body language said it all.French President Jacques Chirac and President Bush, after a year of strained relations, pose for the mandatory handshake outside the G-8 conference room. But as they turn to enter, there's a certain bonhomie...
High Tide for Beach Closings ; New Research Helps Better Pinpoint Causes of Water Pollution at US Beaches
Each year tens of millions of people plop onto America's beaches to bask and bake in the sun. But the question they increasingly face is: "Do I dare go into the water?"Not because it's too cold or because they fear an encounter with "Jaws," but because...
How to Make the G-8 'Club' a Little Less Cozy
The world's exclusive club of powerful industrial nations, called the Group of Eight, may soon become less snooty, more democratic, and more representative of the changing world.The move, if it comes, underlines the growing clout of the developing world....
Iraqi Kurds Consider Autonomy ; after UN Vote, Kurdish Leaders Threatened to Resign from the New Government Wednesday
The United Nations Security Council's unanimous endorsement of Iraqi sovereignty this week has been widely hailed as marking the end of the US-led occupation and control. But history may view it as opening an Arab-Kurd ethnic fissure that will ultimately...
It's Not Power Walking, It's the Power of Walking
I don't drive, and because of this, people often ask me: How do you get around? The answer I usually give is: Being perfectly fit, I walk or bike everywhere. When I need to, I take public transportation.In New York State, this doesn't go unremarked upon.I...
Journey to the Core: Where Does Lava Lead?
Volcano National Park, Hawaii - On its face, the grapefruit- sized rock Donald Swanson unwraps and sets on his desk looks like an unremarkable chunk of earth. Yet to Dr. Swanson, it speaks volumes about a violent eruption 1,200 years ago that is earning...
Letters
Remembering all aspects of Reagan's legacyRegarding Dinesh D'Souza's June 7 Opinion piece, "A child of the 'Reagan revolution' grateful for inheritance": In death as in life, Ronald Reagan, with his legacy of image triumphing over reality, still exerts...
Olympians Weigh Safety vs. Glory ; Athens Has Devoted Record Sums to Security, but Critics Say the 2004 Games Are Still Vulnerable to Attack
The realization hit two-time Olympic medalist Xeno Muller like a thunderclap.As he rowed out in the water during last month's Olympic qualifying trials, he knew his head wasn't where it should be. Out of concern for the safety of his wife and children,...
Reading, Writing, and ... War?
At Hollywood High School - perhaps the most celebrity-packed campus in the country - it takes a lot for an educator to attract attention. But literature teacher Hildreth Simmons still manages to raise eyebrows, not so much with words as with her wardrobe.Just...
Reporters on the Job
* Where's My Torch? The 2008 Olympics, which will be held in Beijing, Wednesday gave the city a major "first": the Olympic torch, a symbol of goodwill, was run through its streets. The one-lb., silver-toned torch started at Tiananmen Square and ended...
Security Precaution Hits Subways: Is It Too Much? ; Boston Is the First City to Plan Random Searches of Commuters, Spurring Questions over Civil Liberties
After Sept. 11, long lines and detailed security checks at airports marked Americans most direct experience with the "new normal." But in the aftermath of the Madrid train bombings in March, US law enforcement once again is broadening its presence at...
States Take Up Their Own Healthcare Reform
Like a train pulling out of the station, the nation's healthcare system is leaving behind an increasing number of Americans who can't afford it.That is why - despite more immediate worries over Iraq and the economy - both presidential candidates are...
Stop the Spread of America's Red-vs.-Blue Political Stain
When I work with community leaders, organizations, and citizens across the nation, I must confess that I never meet people with red or blue faces. Nor have I found people walking down the street in two single files - one red, the other blue.The conventional...
Suit, Goggles, 2,860 Miles to Go
The theme of man vs. nature is a classic that gets better when man attempts something never done before.Take, for example, the coming challenge by Martin Strel, a hale and hearty 50-year-old guitarist from Slovenia. Mr. Strel is here in China to take...
The Blessings of Integration ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Last month marked 50 years since the United States Supreme Court unanimously ruled that segregation in public schools and in every phase of public life was unconstitutional. The next year, in a case that came to be known as Brown II, the Supreme Court...
Then and Now: How Reagan's Stature Rose
For all America knew about Ronald Reagan, he could be elusive. Even his own daughter Patti found him hard to know. In a way, the divergent assessments of the late 40th president in this week of remembrance only reinforce that essential enigma of a man...
West Eyes Musharraf's Promise to Leave Army ; President Pervez Musharraf Has Promised to Step Down from His Military Role by the End of This Year
Pakistan's Pervez Musharraf has two titles - president and general - with two wardrobes to match. He dons a camouflage commando jacket when taking a hard line against Muslim militants, and a traditional salwar chemise when extending an olive branch to...
What Went Wrong at Abu Ghraib ; A Top-Down Push for Harsh Interrogation Techniques Comes to Light, as Investigations into Iraqi Prisoner Abuse Continue
Roughly two months after the scandal became public, a picture is emerging of an atmosphere at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison in which commanders there knew at a minimum of the potential for serious abuses, but put the imperative to gather intelligence ahead...
Wooing Muslim Troops for Iraq
Condoleezza Rice, national security adviser to President Bush, does not expect that the UN backing for Iraq's new government will entice more nations to offer troops. At best, she says, it might encourage countries with troops already in Iraq to stay,...

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