The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 20, 2004

A Frenchman Who Can See Water beneath the Sahara
Out here in the sandy moonscape of eastern Chad, you don't expect to see a diminutive Frenchman with an Indiana Jones hat marching around, muttering, and staring at his global-positioning device.But Alain Gachet has come here to outdo generations of...
A New Corporate Villain - Drugmakers? ; A Number of Charges against the Pharmaceutical Industry Damages Its Credibility and Further Erodes Public Support
Big Pharma is in danger of joining Big Oil and Big Tobacco as one of the bad boys of American industry. A slew of revelations have stung drugmakers in recent months - from charges of hiding unflattering clinical trials to studies showing a link between...
Arafat's Navy without a Sea ; Existence of the Palestinian Naval Police Represents the Struggle over PA Security Forces
This landlocked city may seem an unlikely place to situate a naval base, but for Palestinians without a state perhaps it is fitting to have a navy without a sea.Only the small anchors painted in black on the stucco barracks of the Palestinian Naval Police...
At Home, Politics Is Child's Play
We have been having a lot of political conversations around the house recently. And by "we," I mean me and my 5-year-old.Nearly every day as we stroll down the streets of Philadelphia, with me pushing 70 pounds of children in a massive double jogger,...
At Summer's End, a Golden Transition
A warm fog clings to the rain-soaked earth. A few leaves rustle in the treetops. The deep green summer foliage fills the air with the scent of chlorophyll. Soon another sweltering day will ooze over us, and my goats will seek relief in a dark corner...
China's Hu Takes Army Reins ; Former President Jiang Zemin Resigned His Post as Head of Military Sunday
Sunday's departure of Jiang Zemin as head of China's military was a surprise, though rumors of a power struggle with current president Hu Jintao circled Beijing for weeks.The vote to accept Mr. Jiang's resignation on the last day of a bi-yearly communist...
Classic Guerrilla War Forming in Iraq ; Recent Upsurge in Attacks against Authorities and US Forces Has Parallels, and Differences, with Past Insurgencies
War is never by the books. Adversaries learn and adapt. The political climate shifts on both sides. Loyalties and alliances couple and decouple. The civilian populace - caught in the crossfire - often remains passive just to survive.To many experts,...
Democracy Thrives in Largest Muslim State ; Monday's Vote Is for the First President Directly Elected by the People of Indonesia
Indonesia's presidential favorite Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono spent part of a three-day break between the campaign and Monday's historic election not resting, but writing.The 55-year-old former general spent last Saturday taking a day- long exam to finish...
Energy Stocks for the Conscience-Driven
You can't ride off into the sunset with a hydrogen-powered SUV - or to a middle-class solar home. But as the decades-long transition away from oil begins to take shape, some ethical investors sense a bonanza.This year's spike in oil prices has reignited...
Feeling Creaky? ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
When the holder for the identification badge I wear at work broke a few years ago, I went to the security office to get a new one. While the security staff extolled the virtues of the new holder, I noticed how much darker my hair had been when my picture...
Finally, a Hybrid for the Family
It's not quite as revolutionary as the Model T Ford. But the first hybrid electric vehicle produced by Henry Ford's company will break ground just the same.Ford has introduced the first hybrid SUV to the market. The hybrid Escape represents the first...
How I Cast a Spell on Some Proper Ladies
Even before "Sesame Street," kids called out letters and asked, "What does that spell?" Until the little darling finished, the adult was held spellbound by this activity. In this story, I am the aforementioned little darling.It was a lovely, sunny day...
In Corner Office - the Rise of the Anti-Star? ; after CEO Debacles, Boards Reconsider Who Should Lead
"Where is our Jack Welch?" Rakesh Khurana was taken aback by the question, thrown at him over lunch by a board member of a Fortune 500 firm.The company was on its second chief executive in seven years, both outsiders. And it was preparing for the possibility...
In the Largest Suit Yet, US Sues the Tobacco Industry ; the Justice Department Seeks $280 Billion, but Companies Say They've Already Made Appropriate Changes
In 1953, a debonair Perry Como - advertising he was a two-pack-a- day smoker - helped Chesterfield spread the message that "a medical specialist" found no nose, throat, or sinus problems among people smoking its brand for 10 years.That same year, executives...
Letters
Crack down on criminals, not gun ownersRegarding your Sept. 14 editorial, "What, Assault Rifles Are Back?": The assault weapons ban outlawed rifles virtually identical to firearms it left alone. These guns are so rarely used in crimes they hardly merit...
Parisians Test-Drive a New Bakery
At 8 a.m. on a busy suburban street, cars are lining up, awaiting their turn at the drive-in bakery to buy warm breads. Moms pick out a crusty loaf for lunch, kids beg for pain au chocolat, and businessmen take their croissants in a bag to go.It's hardly...
Reporters on the Job
* Better Than Gorp? Out in the remote reaches of eastern Chad, food and water are scarce. Most of the aid workers and journalists whom staff writer Abe McLaughlin met had their own portable survival food. "One carried jars of olives. Another lots of...
Ruin and Rescue in Appalachia's Floods ; Ivan Brought Western North Carolina Worst Floods in 64 Years
As the waters rose Friday morning, Dot Townsend knew she was in a heap of trouble.Stuck in her little brick ranch house as the Linville River breached its banks under hurricane Ivan's deluge, she watched as doors and propane tanks sailed past her window,...
Soft Patch or Mired in Muck?
The economy is chugging along in what Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan calls a "soft patch." The wheels are spinning but slowly. The conventional wisdom is that the soft patch is a temporary phenomenon and that better times lie ahead.The nation...
The Adventures of My Mother, the Music Woman
My wife and I have spent the past week at our local summer theater rehearsing for a production of "The Music Man," a favorite musical of mine. The protagonist, Harold Hill, comes to town selling musical instruments. He promises to teach the children...
The UN Wags a Finger at Sudan
For the second time in seven weeks, the UN has bared its teeth at Sudan for continuing attacks on civilians in Darfur.Unfortunately, while the new resolution approved on Saturday by the Security Council threatens sanctions, it will probably have as much...
To Defeat Al Qaeda, US Must Build Trust of Moderate Muslims
I have spent my professional life studying social and political movements and the role public opinion plays in them. I was pleased, then, to see that in its recently released report, the 9/11 commission makes the point that America's enemy is not just...
US Capital a Magnet for Foreign Spies ; Alleged Spying by Taiwan and Israel Indicates a Broader Trend, Experts Say: Espionage, Even by 'Friends,' Is Rising
A highly respected US State Department official was arrested last week, suspected of passing secret government documents to Taiwanese intelligence agents. And earlier this month, word leaked that the FBI is investigating a Pentagon official for possibly...
Why Voter Surveys Don't Agree ; Different Readings in the Presidential Race Point, in Part, to a Volatile Electorate
To casual consumers of campaign news - and that would be most voters - the past week may have been particularly perplexing.First the Pew Research Center, a respected nonpartisan polling outfit, showed President Bush ahead of John Kerry by just one point...