The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 31, 2005

After Gaza, Sharon Battles for Likud ; Benjamin Netanyahu Said Tuesday He'd Challenge the Prime Minister for Leadership of Likud
Former Israeli Finance Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced Tuesday that he would seek to oust Prime Minister Ariel Sharon from the premiership and as Likud leader, accusing the prime minister of caving in to terrorism by relinquishing the Gaza Strip...
At 75, Blondie's More Modern Now, but Still Ageless ; Readers Who Turn to the Comic Strip This Sunday Will Find a Scene That Includes Beetle Bailey, Dilbert, and President and Mrs. Bush
She was a gorgeous blonde. He was a bumbling playboy. When they fell in love and married, his billionaire father promptly disinherited them. Undaunted, the couple settled into middle-class life, she as a homemaker and mother, he as the long-suffering...
Barber of Beijing Cuts through a Century of Change
The barber of Houhai plies his trade the old way: a silver razor moves deliberately over the head, across the face, along the bridge of the nose, down the neck. He moves in unruffled concentration, as if time suspends for his work.In some ways, it does....
Churchill and His Ties to the US
Best remembered as British prime minister during World War II, Winston Churchill was also a soldier, journalist, and Nobel Prize- winning author. He also is the only non-American to have his name on an active-duty US Navy ship, and is one of only six...
City's Bulwark against Katrina Is Battered, Not Broken
As hurricane Katrina bore down on the French Quarter on Monday, engineers and a special force called the Levee Police kept a windy vigil on the ramparts that were supposed to keep New Orleans from sinking.Most of those defenses worked - barely. Despite...
Despite More Jobs, US Poverty Rate Rises ; Percentage of Americans in Poverty Grew for the Fourth Straight Year, the US Census Bureau Reported Tuesday
Despite a year in which the US economy added jobs, the percentage of Americans living in poverty grew from 12.5 to 12.7 percent last year - the fourth straight year it's risen.That increase, reported in the much-anticipated annual Census Bureau study...
Drivers Seek Ways to Save at the Pump
For American drivers, penny-pinching is becoming a high art. With gasoline prices rising, cost-conscious drivers are trying everything from gas-station loyalty programs, carpooling, and credit-card rebates to stepped-up maintenance and gentler driving...
Four Years after 9/11, Terror's Hold Is Loosening
Next week will mark the fourth anniversary of Al Qaeda's aerial attack on two New York skyscrapers and the Pentagon in Washington.Let's take stock of what has happened so far in the war on terrorism triggered by those acts:The Taliban in Afghanistan...
Letters
No Marian the Librarian to be found at the University of TexasAs a professional librarian at the University of Texas, I am perplexed by the portrayal of the university's undergraduate library in the Aug. 23 article "Academic libraries empty stacks for...
Math SAT Scores Set Record Highs ; 2005 Results on the Test Improve across Ethnic Lines
The most diverse class of college hopefuls in US history registered the highest average math scores ever reported on the SATs, the leading college entrance exam. These gains, reported Tuesday by the College Board, include all racial and ethnic groups...
Not Guilty ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life
Guilt was my specialty. It's not that I'd committed a crime or done anything all that worthy of guilt. But for a long time, guilt was the drumbeat to which I marched - though unconsciously, I might add.But someone was conscious of the guilt-constant:...
Reporters on the Job
* Hunting China's Heroes : Journalists are often asked where they get their story ideas. Today's story about the "Barber of Houhai" (page 1) emerged from a discussion staff writer Robert Marquand had recently with some friends. He wanted to do a story...
Science Plumbs Placebo Effect
When an inert placebo acts like a drug, is it just a psychological illusion? Or is it a real biological effect? Research reported last week suggests that it's both. The mere belief that they had received a pain killer was enough to release the brain's...
'Sharrows' Aim to Help Cars and Bikes Share Roads ; Special Lane Markings Alert Drivers to Slow Down and Guide Cyclists to a Safer Spot
In the late 1990s, bicycle lanes were painted on streets in northwest Portland, a high-density neighborhood less than a mile from downtown. But congestion at traffic lights made reducing space for automobiles impractical in some areas. As a result, the...
Solution to Delhi Traffic: 'Flyover' ; the City Is Building Short Ramps to Let Cars Bypass Busy Intersections. Traffic Has Improved, but for How Long?
Take a megalopolis bursting with people, add to it a sudden boom in car ownership, and you have the sort of dilemma facing many city planners and engineers in the developing world these days. Delhi, however, has found a quick-fix of sorts: the flyover.Flyovers...
Storm Refugees Face Slow Return ; 4 in 5 Residents of New Orleans Fled Hurricane Katrina. Now, the Trip Home Is Delayed
It's the tailgate party amid turmoil: Teens munch potato chips, dads listen to radios, kids chase each other, while mothers chat nearby. This parking lot, an hour west of New Orleans, has become a way station for hurricane refugees with nowhere else...
Sunni Leap of Faith
Iraq's proposed constitution can be faulted for its contradictions and ambiguities. If those were its only problems, however, the outlook for this democracy-founding document would look a lot better than it now does, for constitutions the world over...
The Flip Side of Sticker Shock
It seems we in the United States are facing sticker shock at the gas pump. Even in Texas, where, you know, they have a warm relationship with the black stuff that comes out of the ground, a local news outlet reported recently, under the headline "Sticker...
The Katrina Factor and Energy Prices ; the Prospect of Damage to Oil Installations Could Send the Price of Gasoline to $3 a Gallon
Energy markets, already strained by robust demand and tight refining capacity in the United States, are now being roiled by a new force: the Katrina factor.One of the largest hurricanes in US history is already raising energy costs. By midday Tuesday,...
This Summer, My Tomatoes Measured Up ; the First Year I Judged a State Tomato Contest, My Own Tomatoes Were a Total Flop. What in the World Had I Done Wrong?
I've always felt that one of the best reasons for gardening is being able to grow tomatoes that taste so much better than anything you can buy. If I could raise only one vegetable, it would be tomatoes.While it's fun to grow my own bell peppers, eggplant,...
Turkey's Kurds Languish in Poverty ; the Kurdish Southeast Copes with Unemployment, Violence
Outside a post office in this southeastern Turkish town ringed by cotton and wheat fields, men and women jostle for position, eager to read a list of names posted near the window. The names are of poor families with school-age children eligible for financial...
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