The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 2, 2009

A Daughter Forges a Trail of Her Own
"Today, your child was introduced to several string orchestra instruments: violin, viola, cello, and bass. Interested students can register for lessons on the enclosed form."Wow, is it time for my daughter to start playing a musical instrument? Wasn't...
A New Book - Yours for the Taking
Not so long ago, Ed Medina was studying in the library of Arcadia University in Glenside, Pa., when he noticed a peculiar package on a nearby table. It appeared at first to be the pieces of a abandoned essay, but when Mr. Medina peered more closely,...
A Spiritual Approach to Money
In turbulent economic times, the watchwords are usually: Cut back. Live frugally. Hunker down and put money in safe places!But here in Boston, small groups of churchgoers have been applying a different message to money management. During the past two...
Biggest Hit as GDP Falls: American Exports
If you wonder why the machinery maker Caterpillar is laying off more than 20,000 workers, the answer comes through loud and clear in the latest numbers on America's economy.As the nation's production of goods and services fell at a 3.8 percent annual...
Debt - Love's Way Out
Last year, credit-card debt in the US reached $937 billion, according to The Institute for American Values report, "For a New Thrift: Confronting the Debt Culture" (The New York Times, David Brooks, "The Great Seduction," June 10, 2008).When people pray...
Ethical Investing: The Obama Effect
A new administration means a new beginning - for voters and investors. Its new policies will change the economic landscape, creating new winners and losers among companies and industries. What should ethical investors look for? To find out, the Monitor's...
Financial Q&A: How Financial-Aid Picture Changes by Waiting to Go to College
Q: Based on my experience, I'm of the opinion that very few 18- year-olds are ready to take full advantage of college. As such, I've encouraged my children to do other things for a few years, including working to save some money. My son is now 22 and...
For Island Players, This Is the 'Poly Bowl'
Pittsburgh Steelers safety Troy Polamalu thought of himself as just an ordinary southern California kid until he moved to Oregon as an 8-year-old to live with his uncle Salu.Salu is Samoan through and through. He helped the boy connect with his island...
Funds Tighten for Fighting AIDS and Malaria Worldwide
The international financial crisis could set back recent progress in international efforts to combat malaria, AIDS, and tuberculosis, global health leaders are warning.They want the Obama administration to make up a deepening shortfall in pledged American...
How Team of Rivals Could Still Save Zimbabwe
If old habits are hard to break, how will Zimbabwe's two warring parties - one led by opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai, the other by longtime President Robert Mugabe - work together in a coalition government, as Mr. Tsvangirai agreed to do last Friday?The...
Illinois's Gov. Pat Quinn Faces a Daunting To-Do List
Call him the anti-Blagojevich.Whereas Illinois's former governor was a showman who loved the limelight and was known for his bravado and unforgettably coiffed hair, its new one - Pat Quinn - is unassuming and modest, a populist reformer who is usually...
In Zimbabwe, a Priceless Party
Never let a lack of cash stop you from hosting friends.After seven years in cash-strapped Zimbabwe, I'm used to not having much. Food shortages and price slashes emptied shops well before last year. Soon, bread became a hard-to-find luxury.As the purse...
Iraqi Vote Expected to Bolster Maliki
Election day was largely free of violence as millions of Iraqis voted in provincial polls that appear to have bolstered Shiite Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's power in the south and weakened the Kurds' dominance in the north.In parts of Iraq the mood...
Keep Privacy in Health Records
The economic recovery package being debated in Congress sets one ambitious goal: Put every person's medical records in digital form. The $20-billion five-year plan would link records to a nationwide health network that aims to improve patient care and...
Letters to the Editor
World should focus on controlling human populationIn regard to the Jan. 29 editorial, "How to feed the hungry billion": This commentary was fine as far as it went. But it needed to go beyond a brief mention of "a global population surge from 6.5 billion...
Mitchell Gets Earful from Mideast
Winding up his week-long tour of the region, President Barack Obama's Middle East envoy, George Mitchell, met Saudi officials here over the weekend for an exchange of ideas on ending the volatile Israeli-Palestinian conflict.Mr. Mitchell conferred with...
One Chavista Explains How 'Father Chavez' Brought Dignity to Venezuela's Poor
President Hugo Chavez might have many critics, but he can also count on legions of passionate supporters - many of them poor - who say he's the first leader to take their problems seriously.One such supporter is Nancy Monsalve. The middle-aged community...
Slowly, Bangladesh Shows the World How Change Is Possible
Roughly 40 percent of Bangladesh's population lives at or below the poverty line. The odds are stacked against anybody willing to take on the seemingly insurmountable task of trying to help 150 million people move beyond a hand-to-mouth existence.With...
Stimulus May Soften, Not End, Recession
President Obama's mammoth stimulus plan may be the largest single bill Congress has ever considered. But that doesn't mean it will solve all the economic problems facing the US.The nation is mired in one of its worst recessions, and is likely to shed...
Unions See Better Days Ahead under Obama's Leadership
Happier days are here for the labor movement in the United States. The AFL-CIO spent $53 million and its trade union affiliates $250 million to help Barack Obama win the White House, relying mostly on "field mobilization" campaigns to turn out a favorable...
What the Cellphone Industry Won't Tell You
In mid-January, the National Safety Council called for a nationwide ban on the use of cellphones while driving, citing overwhelming evidence of the risk of injuries and death from driver distraction.California has banned texting behind the wheel and,...
Where Has Chavez Taken Venezuela?
Jose Luis Ramirez dropped out of school at age 13 and spent most of his life doing odd jobs. The father of six had little time to think beyond how to make ends meet.But after Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez was elected and began a series of social programs...
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.