The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 3, 2005

Buy Stock One DRIP at a Time
Despite a year-end rally, the stock market cooled considerably in 2004. The Standard & Poor's 500 index gained 9 percent last year versus 26 percent in 2003. But investors who pay attention to stock dividends as well as prices have plenty of reasons...
Debate over Israeli Army's Role in School ; Israeli Army Is Launching a Program to Have Lieutenant Colonels Interact with High School Students
For Kerem Blumberg, a high school senior uncomfortable with what she says has been a marked increase in class time devoted to discussing army values, a talk given by a brigadier general last week was cause for protest.She and three other students chained...
Exploring New Oil Fields in Iraq: A Risky Business
It boasts the world's third largest proven oil reserves, a vast unexplored territory of potential oil, and a serious need for cash to rebuild itself. That's why Iraq has taken the first step to open its reserves to the world. In a momentous and highly...
Faiths Unite amid Ruin in India
Amid the tossed fishing boats, overturned railroad tracks, and piles of splintered thatching, this religiously diverse community on India's southeast shore has found new strength within itself after last week's tsunami.It took the government three or...
First Item as Congress Convenes: Change the Rules ; House Considers New Ethics Policies. Senate Eyes Rules Affecting Judicial Nominees
As the 109th Congress opens this week, Republicans are considering rule changes that will rein in the ethics process in the House and curb the minority's capacity to derail judicial nominations in the Senate.If passed, these changes would signal how...
For Immigrant Farmers, a Harvest of Fellowship
My parents, Hungarian immigrants, came to America in the early part of the 20th century. (My father arrived in 1912, having just missed sailing on the Titanic, and my mother in 1922.) They both came from rural backgrounds and were anxious to have their...
How to Profit from a Declining Dollar - and Understand Tax Rules on Real Estate
Q: If a person believes the US dollar is going to continue to lose value, where is a good place to invest? The euro?L.B., via e- mailA: Many pundits are predicting the dollar's continued decline, due in part to the large trade deficit. To date, Ray Benton,...
In 2005, a Mideast Window of Moderation
This past year the Middle East has seen a flurry of developments that will be realized in 2005. Yasser Arafat's passing gives rise to new Palestinian leadership. In Iraq, determination to hold elections, despite promises of violence, will be tested....
In Sri Lanka, Aid Workers Combat Wild Rumors and Lingering Fear ; an Estimated 1.5 Million Displaced Sri Lankans Are Heading Inland, a Coastal Exodus That Is Creating New Logistical Problems
Pawadamasari fished for 35 years from a harbor where a sign reads, "Welcome to Tourist Paradise." He rarely mixed with the mostly German tourists other than to sell his catch.He lived quietly with wife and daughters in a straw hut that is now gone. A...
Letters
Rumsfeld's leadership has won control, but not progressNewt Gingrich's paean to Donald Rumsfeld's brilliance in his Dec. 28 Opinion piece, "Rumsfeld critics are off the mark," willfully ignores the real issue: He praises how well the Army fought in Iraq...
Meet the Young(er) Boss ; Older Americans Are Increasingly Likely to Work for Someone Younger - Relationships That Don't Always Run Smoothly
Until recently, Stephen Schechter had spent his 37-year career reporting to bosses older than himself. For six years, he even enjoyed the luxury of answering only to himself as owner of a small public-relations agency. So it came as something of a surprise...
Memorable Meals with Newsmakers ; the 73 Breakfasts and Lunches Hosted by the Monitor in 2004 Offered New Perspectives - and Insight into Character
The nation and its capital saw some extraordinary news made during 2004 - much of it tied to an election campaign that brought a sprinkling of new faces to Washington even as President Bush held onto the Oval Office despite deep public divisions.As part...
'My' Family ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
I know I'm not the only one rethinking the family dynamics of the holiday season. After several decades of some not-so-merry family gatherings at Christmastime, we now have a better, more relaxed atmosphere, and I'm grateful for the progress we've made...
Relief: Massive Effort, Massive Need ; Global Pledges of Aid Pass $2 Billion, but Supply Snags Keep Many Survivors Waiting
A week after a massive earthquake and tsunami swept from Indonesia through the Indian Ocean, relief officials are frustrated by the logistical problems that have prevented crucial supplies from arriving quickly to those who needed it most, but they are...
Relief Workers in Indonesia Tackle Bottlenecks to Aid ; Indonesia's Rugged Terrain, Downed Bridges, and the Sheer Volume of Aid Are Slowing Supply Distribution
The airplane hangar at Medan's Polonia airport was piled high with boxes of instant noodles, rice, and drinking water Sunday, while relief volunteers and French fire fighters idled nearby, waiting to be flown to disaster-struck areas. The food was destined...
Reporters on the Job
* Bring Your Own Water: Covering a disaster like the tsunami often requires more planning than the normal story assignment. Where to sleep and what to eat, for example, must be considered. Nachammai Raman's story today about three faiths working together...
Seven Steps to Financial Fitness
If you're like many Americans, slimming down, shaping up, or eliminating bad habits may top your New Year's resolution list. But as many planners will tell you, the New Year is also a great opportunity to do things differently with your money. With that...
The Athletic Art of Removing Sheep's Clothing
Aphrodite-like she emerges from her fleece and is pushed by Daniel's boot down the exit chute into the yard below the wool shed. Accompanied by a disjointed symphony of bleating ewes, Classic FM radio, and humming from the shearers' clippers, I flick...
The Next Frontiers in Tsunami Science ; Research Offers New Hope - from Timely Forecasts to Building Codes and Maps of Potential Destruction
A quiet technological revolution is under way that could significantly improve scientists' ability to gauge undersea earthquake and tsunami hazards.Researchers are pinging the seafloor with advanced sonar. Others are cross-examining coral to establish...
The Quality of Mercy
The top UN official for humanitarian aid, Jan Egeland, has offered an apology for implying in the early days of the tsunami disaster that rich countries, especially the US, were being "stingy" in their relief donations. Now, with over $2 billion in official...
This Is No Humanitarian Crisis - Darfur Is a War
Forced evacuations and mass rapes; brutal ethnic killings and rampaging militias; oil profits and arms sales. The deadly mix of politics, economics, and insecurity has displaced 1.6 million people and killed tens of thousands in the Darfur region of...
Vital Technology as a Human Right
The astounding tragedy in the Indian Ocean is not just a human disaster of unbearable magnitude. Nor is it a matter of fate. It is the consequence of years of underinvestment in the scientific and technical infrastructure needed to reduce the vulnerability...
With New Year, New State Laws ; Saturday Ushered in Plenty of Change, from Pets' Inheritance to Hikes in Minimum Wage
Insurance benefits for same-sex couples in California. The abolition of common-law marriages in Pennsylvania. Tighter restrictions on owning big cats, bears, and monkeys in Minnesota. And an increase in the minimum wage in five states.As the clock struck...
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