The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 20, 2008

A Call to Be More Civil
Congress has just approved a massive upgrade for Amtrak, the national rail service. As fuel prices rise, we will become again, like it or not, a people that rides the trains. Now is our chance to think of how we might make that necessity a pleasant one.Trains...
A Chinese Star's Rare Rise in Western Opera
In the past two decades, many musicians have emerged from the ashes of China's Cultural Revolution to reach the top ranks of classical piano, violin, or composition. Yet few opera singers have enjoyed comparable success, making the tale of Hao Jiang...
A Sculptor's Garden in Seattle
Talk about an uphill battle. When sculptor, landscape architect, and Renaissance woman Louise Durocher and her husband, Michael Nelson, reluctantly acquired a yard with their first house, the steeply rising land was shrouded with thorny blackberry vines,...
Court Clarifies Standards for Denial of Disability Benefits
Judges must approach medical disability and health insurance disputes with a skeptical eye when they involve insurance companies that both evaluate and pay employee claims.In a 6 to 3 decision announced Thursday, the US Supreme Court ruled that benefit...
Europe Ratchets Up Its Pressure on Immigrants
In one of the clearest signs yet of Europe's hardening stance on immigration, on Wednesday the European Parliament approved tough new rules for expelling undocumented immigrants, among them a provision allowing member nations to keep migrants in detention...
Finding Unity in Three Minutes of Silence
My formal Chinese language study at Sichuan University in Chengdu, China, was a productive, happy time. And then, the earthquake hit.At first, the table jiggled. Then the building began to shake. Sounds of flower pots crashing, window frames rattling,...
Floods Engulf Archaic Levee System
The floodwaters, in many cases, have simply been too high.The sprawling network of levees - built over many years to protect the Upper Mississippi basin from the sort of disastrous flooding that has claimed homes, lives, and millions of acres of farmland...
Fortitude and the U.S. Open
There's an old saying that when the going gets tough, the tough get going.This was exemplified earlier this week when Tiger Woods won the US Open Golf Championship, his 14th major championship. Because he'd had knee surgery, he hadn't had tournament...
High Court: Limits to Defend Oneself in Court
Criminal defendants do not have a constitutional right to represent themselves in court when a judge determines their mental capabilities aren't up to the task of producing the appearance of a fair trial.In a major 7-to-2 decision announced on Thursday,...
How Iran Would Retaliate If It Comes to War
Pressure is building on Iran. This week Europe agreed to new sanctions and President Bush again suggested something more serious - possible military strikes - if the Islamic Republic doesn't bend to the will of the international community on its nuclear...
How Overfishing Can Alter an Ocean's Entire Ecosystem
In 2000, University of Maine graduate student Amanda Leland began a seemingly straightforward restoration project. She transported 24,000 young sea urchins, which are native to the Gulf of Maine, to an area where overharvesting had caused them to disappear....
Letters to the Editor
Slow the growth of America's money supplyRegarding your June 9 editorial, "Had enough of high prices?": The article fails to take the real cause of inflation into consideration - that is, a rise in the supply of money. It's no small surprise that the...
Midocean Trawlers Mine World's Seamounts
In the mid-1970s, fishing boats came across great aggregations of a reddish fish around underwater mountains, called seamounts, near New Zealand, a kilometer deep. A century before, fishermen had discovered the same species in the northeast Atlantic....
Modern Crews Sign on for Ancient Chinese Dragon Boat Racing
The first thing you might notice about the motley crew of men and women stretching out along the bank of the Charles River on a recent sultry Sunday afternoon is how different they look from one another. If they weren't lined up two-by-two in matching...
Nigerian Oil: Anger in the Delta over Who Gets Paid
When foreign prospectors struck oil deep below the red earth and lush green forest of southern Nigeria, local residents held a wild all-night party that still brings toothless smiles to the wrinkled faces of village elders.Decades later, a peeling signboard...
No One Lives in This Submarine
Already, autonomous vehicles have driven through urban environments and flown combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan, but they've done little to develop their sea legs. However, last week iRobot Corp. acquired rights to market an unmanned submarine...
Obama Opts out of Public Funding for Campaign
In a controversial but not unexpected move, Sen. Barack Obama has opted out of the public financing system for presidential candidates.The decision by the presumptive Democratic nominee, announced to supporters in a video message Thursday morning, makes...
On U.S. Coasts, a Rethink on Oil Drilling?
When Sen. John McCain visits Santa Barbara, Calif., next week, Charles Eckberg will be there to protest the Republican presidential candidate's calls to lift the federal ban on US offshore drilling.Mr. Eckberg, a grass-roots activist, remembers the 1969...
Peanut-Butter Kiss
On a solo trip across country, I unexpectedly ended up in a hospital in northern California. I was discharged on a beautiful May Sunday and went to sit in the courtyard in the center of the building while I got my bearings. I was staying at a friend's...
Rough Patch, Downturn, or Sideways Waffle: They All Spell Recession
"Slow economic growth" - that's President Bush's latest euphemism for the growing economic crisis. A couple of weeks earlier, he acknowledged that these are economic "tough times" for many Americans. Those Americans are finding themselves short of cash...
Scriptwriters Pursue Their Screen Dreams
Newly minted film school graduate Nick Naney envisions the moment "someone" asks about his screenplay, reads it, and wants to produce it. "It could happen," he says from his parents' home in Long Island where he lives while he starts his career.Across...
Six Picks: Recommendations from the Monitor Staff
NOVA scienceNOWSummer is a perfect time to catch up on your ... science, right? PBS thinks so and is giving NOVA scienceNOW a chance to shine in its very own time slot, Wednesdays at 9 p.m. ET/PT. The show has been a surprise hit in its occasional appearances...
Spain Will Pay Unemployed Migrant Workers to Leave
Just a year ago, the Spanish government was contracting workers in countries like Ecuador and Morocco to fill jobs in its booming economy. Now it has adopted a new measure designed to entice those same immigrants to go home. As Spain suffers from the...
The Art of Keeping Cool at Bonnaroo
Once a year, usually under a stuffy, stultifying Southern sky, the faithful begin to assemble on the side of Route 24, some 60 miles southeast of Nashville. Every tribulation will be worn like a badge of honor: the long lines, the lashing rain, the white...
The Language of the Broad Brush
Once upon a time, in the days before e-mail, newspaper editors composed their messages to foreign correspondents on typewriters. Part of a junior editor's job was walking those typed messages to the wire room for transmission. And part of a junior editor's...
Two Sequels That Won't Disappoint
When I think back to my days of childhood reading, two emotions rise, most readily, to the surface of my memory. Disappointment. And anticipation. Disappointment because I hated getting to the end of a great book. (What do you mean it's over?) And anticipation...
U.S. Plan to Ease Air Congestion Runs into Head Winds
An ideological dogfight is under way about the skies over New York and how best to ease the congestion at the region's three major airports.Its outcome will affect millions of American fliers - because half of all delays in the country from Chicago to...
Why Former Mexican Migrants Are Staying Home
Jose Balderama spent half a decade in the United States working roofing jobs in Texas. The money he sent home each month went to his wife and four children - a source of income the family expected to count on for many years to come.But after serving...
Yes to Offshore Oil - but Just Not Now
Relief at the pump soon? Hardly. In their pre-election call to lift the ban on offshore oil drilling, President Bush and John McCain are pulling a fast one on frantic car owners. This new ocean crude is years from flowing to the corner gas station. And...