The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 28, 2000

China's Airbrush Aimed at History ; Collecting Newspapers Lands Song Yongyi in Jail. China Says He Confessed to His Crimes on Tuesday
At the massive, Soviet-style Museum of Chinese History in central Beijing, workers concealed behind camouflage netting are pounding away at the structure. The sound of hammers and chisels echoes across nearby Tiananmen Square as the edifice, one of...
Connick Combines Charm, Humor, and Great Music
Do you ever sing songs in the shower?" Harry Connick Jr. asks a sold-out crowd in Boston. "I might sing this one two or three times," he says, jumping into the Rodgers and Hart tune "With a Song in My Heart." On tour with his 16-piece big band, the...
Etc
I JUST CALL 'EM AS I SEE 'EM The bill being considered in Britain's House of Commons already was controversial when Conservative Party legislator Graham Brady rose to add his voice to the debate. And, politics aside, he wasn't far from the truth when...
How Aunt Lydia Kept Things Together
When my wife was but two days a bride, she arrived on Prince Edward Island, at my expense, ready to tackle the first social engagement of her extensive wedded career. Vera, my senior cousin, had arranged an introductory tea party. She had married Wib,...
How Historians Size Up Clinton: 'Not Too Bad' ; President Gets High Marks for Booming Economy, Low for Personal Control
Done not badly. With seven years down and one to go, that in short is how presidential historians and scholars size up Bill Clinton. They don't put the young commander in chief in the category of presidential greats, or even near-greats - even though...
How We Got a Super Bowl of No-Names
Jack Mills, who for 33 years has been one of the preeminent sports agents for top National Football League players, sits in a downtown restaurant, stares into his salmon salad, then decrees: "Dynasties in the NFL are a thing of the past." Sunday's Super...
Is There Room on Submarines for Women? ; A Pentagon Proposal to Allow Female Sailors aboard Subs Sparks Ire of Navy Brass, Submariners' Wives
If the military is a culture unto itself, the submarine represents another world altogether. Running silent and deep for months at a time, with manufactured air and sardine-cramped quarters, the boats can become emotional pressure cookers submerged...
Look Again ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
I had a few hours between flights in San Francisco. Near the gate where my next flight was to leave was a peaceful, tastefully furnished room open to the public. I took advantage of it to do some reading. At one point I glanced up at the wall clock...
Making a Case for the New 'Classics'
In olden days, when classical was the popular music of the day, audiences looked forward to the next new piece by Mozart or Beethoven. Nowadays, audiences that thrill to Bach and Rachmaninoff - music spanning nearly three centuries - tend to cringe...
Media May Find Themselves on Trial in High-Profile Case ; Ruling to Allow Cameras in Diallo Trial Renews Question of Whether Media Coverage Saps Public Faith in Judiciary
When trial begins of the four white New York City police officers accused of killing with a barrage of 41 bullets Amadou Diallo, an unarmed African immigrant, the media will be on trial as well. The question: Whether they turn the potentially explosive...
Meet the 'Jackie Robinson of Film'
At birth, actor Sidney Poitier weighed less than three pounds and was not expected to live. His parents purchased a tiny casket and made a visit to a local soothsayer. But instead of death, she predicted two things: that he would lead a glorious life...
'Monumental' Divide on Holocaust in Germany
The plan had been that German Chancellor Gerhard Schrder and the other dignitaries who gathered yesterday morning at an expanse of mud and weeds in the city center would witness the groundbreaking ceremony for a "Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe."...
Penetrating 'Belfast, Maine' Gets Inside a Small Town
Nobody knows what a new Frederick Wiseman documentary will be like until it's finished - including the real-life people who appear in it. Criminal-justice workers who saw themselves in his "Juvenile Court" must have been pleased with the conscientiously...
Playing in the Big Game Means Risking Scorn
It seems prudent, in the interest of attracting and maintaining maximum readership, that the subject matter of this column not be mentioned too soon. That's because, should it be, many would stop reading right now. For example, if the subject were mentioned...
Putin Who? Russia's Presidential Enigma ; Former Colleagues Recall the Acting President as Invisible, Efficient, in Control
Asked to describe Acting President Vladimir Putin, Yevgeny Savastyanov sighs and reaches for a quote from "Dead Souls" by Nikolai Gogol, the 19th-century Russian novelist. "A man who, though not handsome, was not ill-favored, not over- fat and not over-thin....
Quiet Vignettes in Indonesia ; Sectarian Violence in the Maluku Islands Rages, but Reconciliation Is Also in the Works
During a year of sectarian violence, the city of Ambon in Indonesia's Maluku islands has become a checkerboard of hatreds. A Muslim who enters a Christian quarter will very likely meet death, and vice versa. For centuries, followers of both religions...
Rise and ... Rise of America Inc. ; Entrepreneurial Spirit and Technology Fuel the Longest Economic Expansion in US History
A few years ago, Kathy Daigle was getting "farm workers" wages - $7,000 a year - at a seed company in rural Maine. To feed her two children, she needed food stamps and the free hot lunch the school provided. She navigated Maine's rutted roads in a 1981...
Seeking an Unseen World of Words
My daughter was struggling with her book report. The assignment required her to go beyond a synopsis of the plot of "April Morning," to delve beneath a mere recital of the list of characters. It required her to step outside of her comfort zone with language....
Software That'll Clean Your Shower?
Now that our information superhighway has survived the Y2K crisis, technology companies and computermakers can move forward at the speed of flying electrons as they bring out new products and services for the emerging dotcom society. Many TV commercials...
Sports 101
Is it the Super Bowl of football or the Super Bowl of food? Some would argue the latter. More than 14,500 tons of chips and 4,000 tons of popcorn will be consumed on Super Bowl Sunday this weekend. But remember, there is a game to be watched! Between...
Take My Primary - Please!
Live in New Hampshire long enough, and you're bound to get made fun of for one reason or another. But a well-kept secret is that most Granite Staters make fun of themselves when it comes to our first-in-the-nation presidential-primary status. Most of...
The Monitor Movie Guide
Red stars denote the reviews of Monitor movie critic David Sterritt unless otherwise noted. Ratings and comments by the Monitor panel ( blue stars) reflect the sometimes diverse views of at least three other moviegoers. Information on violence, drugs,...
The Unpretentious Heroines of 'Waiting'
Sometimes big changes come by modest means. Individual acts of faith and courage may, in fact, move mountains. "Waiting to be Invited," by S.M. Shephard-Massat, which received its world premire at the Denver Center Theatre Company last week, zeroes...
Today's Story Line
Newspapers are a rough draft of history - a synthesis of what appears to be the most important events yesterday. They are earnest, if inherently incomplete, snapshots of our recent past. If you could ask China scholar Song Yongyi about his work, he'd...
Tuesday's Primary Prize: The Changeables ; in New Hampshire, It's the Voters Now Undecided Who Can Make a Big Difference
Bill Small started out the evening interested in George W. Bush and John McCain, but wound up more intrigued by Steve Forbes and Alan Keyes. He has never voted in a primary election before. His wife, Judy, a registered independent, still can't decide...
Twyla Tharp Steps into 2nd Movement of Her Career
The showpiece of the winter season of the New York City Ballet (NYCB) at Lincoln Center - and the only new work - is "The Beethoven Seventh," audaciously choreographed by Twyla Tharp to the triumphant themes of the composer's familiar symphony. The...
USA
In the last debates before next Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, both Democratic and Republican presidential candidates took tough stands against one another. Texas Gov. George W. Bush and Sen. John McCain of Arizona were accused by their Republican...
What's on TV ; Listings Are Not Necessarily Recommended by the Monitor. All Times Eastern, Check Local Listings
SATURDAY 1/29 Akira Kurosawa: The Last Emperor (Independent Film Channel, 8- 8:45 p.m.): Kurosawa was the uncontested master of Japanese cinema. He learned from American films, and filmmakers around the world learned from him. This absorbing documentary...
When Conspiracy for Good Is Bad
Outrageous, what the television networks have done. I don't mean poisoning the American mainstream with sex and violence. Much worse, they've been caught red-handed conspiring with the government to spread propaganda against drug abuse. The law requires...
Why Arabs Can't Easily Befriend Israelis
Helen Motro's Jan. 12 opinion piece "Israel the Invisible" complains that citizens in Jordan and Egypt are not welcoming and cordial to Israeli tourists. While I agree with Ms. Motro that "peace in name is no peace," and that "hatred can only die by...
World
The political party of Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak was fined $3 million and subjected to a criminal investigation for its role in a campaign-funding scandal. Comptroller Eliezer Goldberg, in a report to parliament, said Barak's One Israel Party...
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.