The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 5, 2002

A Chameleon Ally in Pakistan
The Sept. 11 assault upon America changed the contours of the world. It also gave Pakistani military dictator Pervez Musharraf an avenue to respectability. The Pakistani general, who seized power in a coup d'etat in 1999, was a principal architect of...
A Harder Look at Visa Overstayers ; since Sept. 11, Calls Have Increased to Keep Closer Tabs on Visa Holders
Let's call her Marissa. She has wavy hair in a bob and dark eyes that are quick to smile. A Palestinian from Israel fluent in four languages, she earned a graduate degree in Moscow. She's also an illegal immigrant. Marisa - and almost half of the estimated...
Boarders Catch Some 'Big Air'
Fun is the name of this winter Olympics event. Wait - don't you mean "hard work"? To world-class United States snowboarder Ricky Bower, they are one and the same. "People say, 'You worked so hard!' " Bower said in a recent interview. "But it was all...
Bush Budget for a Changed World ; New Realities Promise Tough Hill Fight: Deficits Are Back, Debt Reduction Is out, Social Security Isn't Sacrosanct
What a difference a war makes. Last year, President Bush presented Americans with a peacetime, have-it-all budget. It promised a hefty tax cut while leaving Social Security untouched. It called for paying off part of the national debt. Even after all...
Bush Shifts Stance on Overseas Development ; He Once Scoffed at Reach-out-and-Touch Someone Policy, but It's a New Focus of War on Terrorism
Teacher-training for Pakistan. Textbooks for Afghanistan. More Americans overseas helping the poor improve their lives. And more foreign students and scholars coming to discover the American way of life. These are the tools that the US is increasingly...
Don't Neglect the Roots of Terrorism
Is the United States stepping away from a fundamental element in the global war against terrorism: the willingness to play a dynamic leading role in finding permanent solutions to the most serious of regional conflicts? The Bush administration is fully...
Everyone's a Star
Professors in the United States, it seems, need a crash course in a key scholarly concept: evaluation. To evaluate is to judge. But a new paper published by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in Cambridge, Mass., says that's not what's happening...
Finally, Boston Gets Its Moment of Glory
Harvard historians will debate for years which Americans were more silent. Tories loyal to the Crown as cannons atop Dorchester Heights blasted the British fleet from Boston harbor. Or citizens of St. Louis after the New England Patriots defense shot...
Healthcare Again Grabs Political Attention ; Layoffs Add to Ranks of Uninsured as Hospitals Face Inflation, Cuts in Medicare
During the late 1980s and early 1990s, Washington was much troubled by the "health-care-cost crisis." Medical costs were rising at double-digit annual rates in the United States. The problem is back - and so is its political currency as an election-year...
In Placid Singapore, Civil Disobedience Simmers ; Ethnic Tension Rose Yesterday, as Two Schoolgirls Were Suspended for Wearing Islamic Headscarves
For weeks, the open-air coffee shops and gleaming office towers of this multiethnic city-state have buzzed with tales of suspicion and fear. Chinese businessmen have wondered if they should fire all of their Muslim workers; Malay men, who are predominantly...
In Vogue: Trading Cards That Feature Exemplary High-Schoolers
Trading cards are back in fashion at some Atlantic County, N.J., elementary schools - but these cards don't carry your typical sports stars. Instead, they feature 42 high school juniors and seniors who excel in academics and school activities. To land...
Lying Low in 'Taliban Country' ; as the US Hunt for Al Qaeda Continues, Afghans Are Reluctant to Help, for Fear of Being Abandoned
The tribal chiefs say they haven't seen a foreigner here for years, but they insist that they're dying to take an American hunting in the hills outside of town. That is where US Black Hawk helicopters are already whipping through snow-covered mountain...
Olympic Committee Polishes Image as Winter Games Near
Perhaps nothing embodies the new spirit of the International Olympic Committee more than this one-block stretch of Main Street here. On the left is the Grand America hotel, a white-pillared monolith of unseemly opulence - lit brighter than the State...
Russia Says 'Return,' but Chechen Refugees Stay Put ; Refugees Are Fleeing Chechnya's Civil War in Rising Numbers
Larissa Dakayeva is a recent statistic in a forgotten crisis. Two months ago she fled to this squalid refugee camp from her home in Serzhen Yurt, in central Chechnya, seeking escape from the constant stress and hazards of a war the Kremlin has repeatedly...
Say It in Pashto: US Troops Learn New Tongues ; at Ft. Bragg, They Get Cultural Tips and Watch 'Mary Poppins' in Arabic
At heart, Jim, a "special ops" commando out of southern New Mexico, is probably a bit more John Wayne than Lawrence of Arabia. But the blond, 30-something veteran of several Middle Eastern tours hasn't spent the past few weeks target training for raids...
Schools Give Lessons a Five-Ring Spin ; Teachers Take Advantage of the Olympics to Enliven Academic Subjects
Quick: Where's the salt in Salt Lake City? How do the laws of physics affect Olympic speed skaters? What's the Spanish word for bobsled? Teachers across the United States, adroitly aware of their students' enthusiasm toward the start of the Winter Olympics...
Starting with a Clean Slate ; before an Engineering College Opens, 30 Student 'Partners' Test out Its Radical Approach
Visiting the building site of the Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, the first US engineering school in four decades to be created from the ground up, is like witnessing a collective academic bungee jump. Leighton Ige, a high school valedictorian...
Yemen Fights Own Terror War ; with US Help, Yemen Hunts Militants and Deports Illegal Islamic Students
"You are not the first strangers to come our way," says Mohammad Salah, a young Bedouin, as he adjusts the dagger, cellphone, and beeper on his colorful embroidered belt, lays down his two Kalashnikovs, and recounts the story of three travelers. Five...
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