The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 1, 1995

A Brief, Uneasy Respite in the Midst of Danger as World War II Ended, American Barbarah Straede and Her German Landlord, Heinz Cramer, Fled Russian-Occupied Berlin on Foot and, Later, by Boat. Their Desperate Objective: To Reach the American Forces at the Elbe River. on the Fifth Day, Their Story Continues
After several nights spent in the woods and along the river, it ceased to be strange to us. We accepted nature as offering the larger, safer refuge in war.After a cold, wet night in the boat, the next morning we rowed back across the inlet from Peacock...
A Partnership with Peace
OUT of the ashes of World War II, the United States and Europe formed the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. NATO successfully protected Western Europe from Soviet attack and brought Europe one of its longest periods of stability in history. Out of...
A Peek into Secretive N. Korea
AS a North Korean patriot, the young man works his library job seven days a week in service to the late strongman Kim Il Sung."I devote myself to my country. I devote myself to the 'Great Leader,' " he says, referring to the president who died last July.But...
Celebrating WWII's Other Front the Allies Conquest in South of Europe Ended Longest Campaign of the War
WHEN Allied forces liberated Italy after 540 days of intense fighting, Winston Churchill was elated. "There have been few campaigns with a finer culmination," he wrote later.His satisfaction was more than justified. The war for Italy was supposed to...
Death Spotlights Plight of Child Laborers Pakistani Boy Campaigned Worldwide
IQBAL MASIH was only 12, but his brave fight to free other children from bonded labor under often extreme conditions won him international recognition. His murder on April 17 has brought a worldwide outcry and more demands for tougher action against...
Democrats See 'Solid South' Slipping Away Retirements May Speed Realignment
DEMOCRATS, stunned by last November's electoral losses, are now facing a new bit of bad political news: Their chance of winning back the Senate in 1996 is dwindling from slim to slimmer.The reason is retirements. Two weeks ago, Sen. David Pryor (D) of...
Donors Rethink Aid to Rwanda in Wake of Refugee Massacre PRESIDENT PROMISES INQUIRY
GOVERNMENT troops from the Tutsi-dominated Rwandan Patriotic Army (RPA) moved into the Kibeho refugee camp at dawn on April 18, firing into the air, sending panic through the packed huts in the camp built on five hills. Over the next few days, as the...
Eccentric Cast Plunges Ahead, but Fails to Save 'Search and Destroy' Artist David Salle Takes a Painterly Approach to His Debut Film
Painting and cinema are both visual arts, so one might think creative people would travel easily between them. Such crossovers are more the exception than the rule, however, and painter David Salle's first movie, "Search and Destroy," points up the pitfalls.Salle's...
Farm Bill Preview
LAST week's conference on rural development and farm policy in Ames, Iowa, was a mild scenesetter for what promises to be an intense debate in Washington over the 1995 farm bill. The few headlines that emerged from Ames dealt with President Clinton's...
Finally Learning to See the Unseen
For years, the prairie around me was haunted by what I called "invisible birds." In spring and summer, as I rode horseback across the prairie pastures, I could hear twittering close by, as though dozens of birds were singing on my shoulder or tiny bells...
High Court Draws a Line
FOR the first time in 60 years the Supreme Court has ruled to limit congressional power -- by deciding last week that Congress could not use the interstate commerce clause to outlaw guns within 1,000 feet of a school. Hence, possession of a gun in or...
Home Prices Soar Where Buffalo Roam
WHEN newlyweds Tammy Kikuchi and Calvin Nakamura bought their first home in Utah in 1989, they had no idea they were moving into a bank vault.Thanks to an influx of California companies to the Salt Lake City area, housing demand in the region has soared....
North Korea Talks Tough but US Sees Hope on Nukes Pyongyang Reaches Deadlock in Talks, Balks at Assistance from Seoul
WHILE North Korea's rhetoric has grown strident, the United States does not appear overwrought by the deadlock in negotiations over the Communist state's alleged nuclear weapons program.Not that the Clinton administration isn't eager to resume the talks...
Oklahoma Bombing Puts Gun Lobby on Defensive
NAZIS. Murderers. Jack-booted thugs.Most people would apply these terms to the terrorists who blew up the federal building in Oklahoma City on April 19. But six days before the bombing, the National Rifle Association (NRA) used them to describe some...
Russia's Pretrial Detention Centers Replace the Gulag as Sites of Horror A Tattered Economy and Broken-Down Legal System Leave People Who Are Presumed Innocent Languishing in Torturous Holding Cells
INSIDE a dimly lit cell built for 35 men in Moscow's two-century-old Butyrka prison, some 85 detainees stand or sleep in shifts on the filthy floor.The air is so thick it stings the eyes; a mixture of cigarette smoke, sweat, and unwashed bodies mingles...
Saving for College: Never Too Early for a Child Born Today, College Costs Could Exceed $300,000 at the Ivies, $200,000 at a Private College, and $100,000 at a Public University Series: YOUR MONEY
IF you think buying a house, or a car, or a John Deere power lawn mower is expensive, you obviously haven't paid for college yet.If you want to talk big bucks, take a look at projected college costs for the next five to 20 years. It is estimated it will...
She Sang 'Rescue Me' in the '60S; Now She's Back -- Singing Praise
Fontella Bass grew up singing gospel music in church and gained fame after recording the blockbuster pop single "Rescue Me" in 1965. Then she disappeared into relative obscurity. Now she's making a comeback with the gospel album "No Ways Tired," an eclectic...
Some Lessons about Light
When I was a child, I longed for early summer to come quickly so I could skip on the walk, pick bouquets from the garden, and sit for hours on the chintz-pillowed, white wicker furniture listening to grandmother's two king warblers, Midas and Croesus,...
States Scale Back Health-Care Reform
REMEMBER Harry and Louise? They were the worried couple, created for insurance-industry television advertisements, who helped stop President Clinton's health-care reform plans last year.And their views -- favoring go-slow, incremental reforms rather...
The Complex and Curmudgeonly Character of Evelyn Waugh
EVELYN WAUGH: A BIOGRAPHYBy Selina HastingsHoughton Mifflin,724 pp., $40TO the generation that came of age in the 1920s, Evelyn Waugh's scintillating satires seemed to epitomize the style of an era. Yet successive generations have also turned and returned...
This Safety Net Supports Work A Modest Subsidy Program Would Get Many Mothers off Welfare, Increase Their Incomes, and Cost Taxpayers Nothing, an Economist Says
AT the heart of the welfare-reform debate is the future of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), the federal program that provides income support mainly for single mothers and their children. Because many AFDC recipients do not hold jobs, the...
Two New Blocs Enter Russian Power Game, the Rest Benched
RUSSIAN Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin has stepped out of President Boris Yeltsin's shadow and onto center stage to help create his country's emerging political establishment.With the blessing of President Yeltsin, the prime minister has announced...
War of Words Continues 50 Years after Fascists' Defeat
'FASCISTS, out of the procession," shouted angry demonstrators last week in Milan, celebrating the 50th anniversary of Italy's liberation from Fascist dictatorship.But the insult was not directed at members of an extremist party, but at a delegation...
Would You like More Good in Your Life? Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to World Events and Daily Life
WHO wouldn't like more good in life? Good is something we just can't have too much of! But it often seems as though the good we seek is out of reach. How do we find answers when problems loom large in our lives?The Bible provides an answer so simple...