The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 22, 2000

A Book on Adoption That Doesn't Pull Any Punches
Adoption touches many more Americans today than even 10 years ago. A recent study says that 6 in 10 people have either thought about adopting, or know a friend or family member who is considering or had adopted. More than 120,000 children are placed...
A Nation Transfixed ... by Politics? ; High Ratings for News Coverage of Election 2000 Belie Claims That Americans Aren't Interested in Politics
Network news executives must be scratching their heads. Their ratings are doubling - in some cases tripling - and there's not a scent of scandal, sex, or celebrity chatter issuing forth from their news desks. What's got Americans riveted is just...
A Stylized Portrait of Abundance
'Folk art' is something of a catchall term. It covers a range of artistic endeavor from highly skilled to naively awkward, from peasant tradition to drawing-room gentility, from matter-of-fact artisanship to hopeful amateurism. Folk artists often...
A Wider Circle of Family ; Parents Who Adopt outside the US Find Value in Bringing Their Kids Together
"I'm from Moldova," proudly proclaims six-year-old Charlie Phillips. "I came on an airplane, my sister came on an airplane. Babies come on airplanes." In Charlie's world babies do indeed come from airplanes - because in his world most babies are...
Before There Were Pious Pilgrims, There Were Bold Merchants
Poor planning, foolhardy leadership, and rotten weather brought down the plans of those 16th-century English merchants who hoped to plant colonies on North American soil. They were adventurers and gentlemen, dreamers and schemers, but their several...
China Can Just Say 'No' to Dictates of the West
The "Say 'No' Club" doesn't require dues, members are more likely to meet in Internet chat rooms than over tea, and their mutual support isn't against personal vices, but economic globalization in China. Amid China's eagerness to join the Word Trade...
Congress Prepares for Plot Twists ; If the Electoral College Tally Is Ultimately Disputed,lawmakers Could Have a Say in Who's President
With the next president still unannounced, Congress is gearing up for what yet may be an important role in determining who will sit in the Oval Office. For most of its history, Congress's counting of the electoral votes for president the first week...
Cutting Greenhouse Gases Is a Two-Way Street
The world's governments are trying to finish an agreement on how to cut greenhouse-gas emissions and reduce the threat of global warming. While the spotlight has been on competing proposals for cutting emissions in industrialized nations, the question...
Does the US Need UNESCO?
Yes, but. For its part, Washington should pay closer attention to changes under way at the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization. The agency long has been viewed as harboring strong anti- American and anti-Western biases,...
Feed Now Fuels French Industry ; amid a 'Mad Cow' Scare, Factories Find a Novel Way to Dispose of Suspect Animal Byproducts
Roaring and grinding as it rotates, the enormous steel cylinder that spans the courtyard of the cement factory here throws off a shock of heat that hits you 20 feet away. Inside, a jet of flame burning at more than 3,500 degrees F., is turning limestone...
Fledgling Black Networks Carve out Space
When Angela Palmer of NUE-TV talks to nonminority audiences about the fledgling cable network she works for, she asks them to imagine how they would feel if they woke up one day and the only television channel that offered anything aimed at their...
Glad Songs and Cider to Soothe the Savage Traveler
When some weary travelers get off their planes today at Newark International Airport, they will see Robert Baldwin, a Sammy Davis Jr. look-alike, crooning in the corridors: "Hello, my friends, welcome to Newark." Mr. Baldwin, a former hotel concierge,...
Great Pyramid's Age? New Theory Looks to the Stars
British archaeologist, Kate Spence, has a novel solution to an Egyptian mystery. It explains how ancient surveyors could have used stars to orient the pyramids at Giza when they had no pole star to guide them. It reduces the uncertainty in the start...
Growing Up a Thanksgiving Impostor
My mother had her first Thanksgiving in 1979, six weeks after she and my father arrived from Lebanon with their two small children. We were staying with my aunt in New Jersey while my father looked for work. My dad, who had gone to college in New...
Haircuts in Hanoi Require a Few More Words of Vietnamese
"OK, today's the day. We're getting haircuts for you boys." I was tired of seeing my sons, Chase and Quinn, with wild hair creeping over their eyes. We were living in Hanoi for five months. I wanted to practice my Vietnamese language skills and also...
How Conflict Remolded Dahlan's Attitudes
How quickly things change. Part politician and part enforcer, a youthful Palestinian leader named Mohammed Dahlan once fought to keep the peace process safe for Israel by arresting those determined to sabotage a negotiated settlement. A leading Israeli...
If Courts Can't Decide, Fla. Legislature Might ; under a Federal Statute, the Republican-Controlled Body Has the Power to Decide Who Gets the State's Electors
Republican lawmakers in Tallahassee, Fla., are preparing to swing into action to guarantee George W. Bush is the next president in the event that the Florida Supreme Court is unsuccessful in resolving the impasse over Florida's 2000 presidential election....
Let's Make a Deal ; Corporate Media Set Sights on African-American Market
It's slowly sinking in, both inside and outside cable channel Black Entertainment Television, that something has changed. On BET talk shows, hosts are making quips about having deeper pockets thanks to new owner Viacom, whose other properties include...
Living in the Shadow of 'El Popo' ; for the Past Few Weeks, Mexico's Popocatepetl Volcano Has Spewed Ash and Belched Molten Rocks
The prospect of living under a live volcano that regularly spews plumes of ash and the occasional hot rocks might not sit well with a lot of people. But for Roman Sandoval Jimenez, whose small town lies on the slopes of Mexico's smoking Popocatepetl...
One Size Fits All
The World Wide Web just got the cyber equivalent of a pair of spandex shorts. The independent board that oversees the Internet's addressing system, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, known as ICANN, decided last week to add...
Palestinians, Allies, Plead for UN Force ; Kofi Annan Is Discussing the Issue in Meetings This Week. Israel, the US Object
Violence routinely begets violence. And in the modern world, it sometimes begets international intervention. That is the logic Palestinians are using as they repeat their demands for international protection from the United Nations. Given the opposition...
Pilgrims Still Flee to America for Free Worship
This Thanksgiving story begins not with Pilgrims in the Old World, but with a veiled Iranian woman who whispers prayers as she slips past Tehran guards and boards a flight to religious freedom. It is also the story of a small, naive Tibetan boy, hiking...
Stereotypes Tarnish 'Golden Years'
Call it a duel between New Images and Old Stereotypes. When the subject is retirement and aging, conflicting views abound. On one side stand the optimists, eagerly heralding New Images of activity in later years. Think of astronaut John Glenn, hurtling...
The Bible and Self-Esteem ; Originally Printed as an Editorial in the Christian Science Sentinel
When my friend Susan needs self-confidence, she opens up her Bible. "It speaks in such a gentle way," she says. "The Bible makes me feel special - like somebody loves me." The "somebody" Susan is talking about is God. And she's right. The Bible's...
The First Biography of the Economic Miracle Worker
Thank goodness for lively journalists. When they write books, they can make what could be a dull, difficult story fascinating and fun to read. That's the case with this first full biography of Alan Greenspan, chairman of the Federal Reserve, and,...
The Many Keys to a Simple Life
When I'm walking on the streets of New York City, I hear a jangling sound. It is not change in my pocket, but the 13 keys I carry. I feel like a jailer. The weight makes holes in my pockets. I live a life of relative simplicity. No car. No country...
Think Florida Is Confusing? Try Voting from Russia
My husband and I are currently in Russia working on the Medical Assistance to Russian Orphans project. When we realized that we would have to stay in Moscow longer than anticipated, we went to the US embassy one month prior to election day and filled...
Turkey - the Second Time Around
To some, the very word "leftover." is chilling, both figuratively and literally. But to food-savvy folk, the little covered plastic containers and oddly shaped aluminum-foil packets in the fridge present an unequaled culinary challenge. Let's begin...
USA
As a spokesman declared "there's no timetable" for rendering a decision, Florida's Supreme Court justices weighed legal arguments over the state's bitterly contested vote for president. During Monday's hearing, the justices questioned all sides intensely,...
What's New
Wailing Wall gender issues Women for and against reading aloud from the Torah at the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site, argued their cases Sunday before an expanded Supreme Court panel that agreed to rehear the controversial issue. Six months...
World
In a show of anger, the government of Egypt ordered its ambassador home from Israel following the latter's retaliatory attack Monday against Palestinian targets in the Gaza Strip. It was not clear when Muhammad Bassiouny would be permitted to return....

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