The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 14, 2002

Afghan Youths Form a Sort of YMCA ; Young People Flock to a Grass-Roots Program Spreading across the Country
There may be no telephones or newspapers here. But that hasn't stopped news from spreading about an extraordinary project run by a group of young people in this bustling city in northern Afghanistan.Every day, new students register for classes in the...
Al Qaeda Quietly Slipping into Iran, Pakistan ; A Web of Regional Players Could Foil the Search for Bin Laden and His Associates
With the hunt for Osama bin Laden and his associates bogging down in regional and tribal politics, American officials say they are facing the unsettling prospect that Al Qaeda members are slipping away into Iran. Senior Afghan intelligence and security...
An Emily Post Approach to Kids' Sports
Amid the squeak of sneakers on the lacquered court, the public- address announcer has one final thing he wants to say to the crowd at a girl's basketball game in this St. Louis suburb before tip-off - remember your manners. Under a code of conduct the...
A New Take on the 'Blind Trust' ; How Executives Insulate Themselves from Holdings That Could Get Them into Trouble
There was a time in the not-too-distant past when corporate insiders had a significant leg up on the rest of us when it came to making personal investment decisions. Armed with the kind of sensitive, confidential information you obtain only by being...
A Rite of Passage on the Snowfields of Rainier
It was all Lori's doing, really. For years my friend had been prattling on about her plans to one day climb Mt. Rainier in Washington State. Having climbed Rainier myself, I listened to her pronouncements with benign amusement. Lori cracks me up. But...
Business & Finance
Reaction to the massive corporate overhaul announced Friday by Ford Motor Co. was swift and, in at least one case, angry. Although some industry analysts applauded the comprehensive plan, two credit ratings agencies lowered their assessments of the world's...
Butterfly Thoughts Transport Me
It is hard to say when I last saw a butterfly. The fruit of city- dwelling, perhaps? I'm not sure, though, that it is just that. Butterflies may be almost as rare in the country now. Agricultural insecticides have radically contributed to the rarity...
Despite Budget Gaps, States Beef Up Security ; Adding State Troopers May Cost More Than Other Ideas, Such as Roving Wiretaps
WASHINGTON As state legislatures across America gather for their first sessions of 2002, they're taking up a host of proposed laws and funding priorities that could significantly boost the powers - and profile - of police and other law enforcers. The...
Divvying Up of 9/11 Aid Leaves Few Happy
As the special master of the September 11 Victims Compensation Fund, Kenneth Feinberg knows a lot about the anguish of bereaved families. He also knows that he can never make all of them happy. Ever since the fund's interim rules were announced, they...
Energy Funds: Can a Sooty Sector Finally Throw Some Heat?
Dan Gillespie, who manages the Rydex Energy Fund, likes his sector - big time. His fund has more than 90 percent of its portfolio in energy issues, the highest percentage of assets linked to energy among equity funds tracked by Chicago-based information...
Etc
THERE'S JUST ONE TINY MISTAKE When a political candidate spends $75,000 or so on outdoor ads for his gubernatorial bid, you'd think the agency he hired to produce them would at least get his name right. After all, the company in question isn't inexperienced...
Ex-Taliban Officials Change Headdress, Resume Duties
Until the fall of Kabul two months ago, Mullah Al-Haj Khaksar was the Taliban's deputy minister of the interior. He oversaw the police forces, and his job was "to establish peace and security in Kabul as well as other provinces." Today, he still sits...
GOP Image at Risk in Enron Saga
As probes of White House dealings with firm grow, the perception of cozy ties to business may hurt Bush most. coziness with business, biggest risk may be with voters. For Bush, a big one is that more voters will see him - and his party - as too closely...
Heartfelt Best Wishes, Hallmark
Some people might be appalled by Maya Angelou's new deal with Hallmark cards. After all, to many people, the company has become a symbol of cloying sentiment and cutesy tchotchkes, not to mention tear-jerking commercials filmed through the gauzy haze...
Help for Older Ex-Prisoners
No state has a program to help older ex-offenders re-integrate into society, according to the Justice Department, the Urban Institute, and other analysts. In fact, notes the Urban Institute, many states don't have any re-entry program for those of any...
How We're Funny about Our Money
When you open a new bar of soap, do you meld the remnants of the old bar with the new one? After eating at a restaurant with friends, do you split the tab equally, or divvy it up according to who ate what? When it comes to banking, do you share your...
In China, Battling the Girth of a Nation ; Western Fast Foods and a Changing Lifestyle Have Meant More Overweight Chinese Youth - and Weight-Loss Clinics
Ho Fang is 20 years old and 265 pounds. And he's hungry. During three years studying commerce among the barbecues and supermarkets of Melbourne, Australia, he gained 88 pounds. So, on his return to Beijing, his mother sentenced him to a regimen of 6...
Letters
INS is just following the whims of its bosses In "Finding visa abusers" (Jan. 10, Editorial), the question was asked why the INS didn't act sooner to provide the names of some 300,000 aliens, ordered deported from the US, to other law- enforcement agencies....
No Quick Solution to Deforestation in Lush Chiapas ; Mexico Is Losing Nearly 3 Million Acres of Forest and Jungle Each Year, a Study Says
On approach, the tiny hamlet of Quexil looks like an idyllic if impoverished country village. Animals graze on green farmland. Children chase one another through lush foliage. A scattering of humble shacks is dwarfed by pine and cedar- capped mountains...
Nuclear NIMBY
Long after Enron is forgotten as the political issue of 2002, future historians will note a decision made last week by US Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham. He formally recommended that 70,000 tons of radioactive waste from the nation's nuclear power...
Over Time, Social Funds Hold Their Own
In a murky market, many investors are cleaning up their act. Forgoing traditional performance-oriented strategies, a growing number of individual and institutional investors are limiting their investment universe to companies and funds screened for social...
Political Finger-Pointing Clouds Economic Realities
Election season has arrived in the United States. Genuine, honest analysis of public economic issues has started to fade further in favor of misleading rhetoric for political purposes. "Expediency throws economic argument on its head," says Richard Kogan,...
Satellite Merger Sends Mixed Signals to Consumers
The proposed merger between the nation's two largest satellite- TV providers is the starkest evidence yet that satellite services could soon rival communication behemoths such as AT&T and AOL TimeWarner in name recognition and consumer subscriptions....
Seeking Alternatives to Education IRAs
Q I'm a senior citizen concerned about my grandchildren's education. The law allows $500 a year for a child's education through an IRA. Are there alternatives to set aside more for children? J.C., Peoria, Ariz. A Under recent tax-law changes, parents,...
Sudan Leads Antiterrorist Push ; as East African Leaders Discuss Ways to Challenge Terrorism, the US and Sudan Are Getting Friendlier
As the US intensifies its scrutiny of two African nations that it suspects of harboring terrorists, leaders from Sudan and Somalia - and five of their neighbors - gathered last week to discuss their region's growing reputation as a haven for militants,...
Texas Tries to Prove Electricity Deregulation Can Work ; Lone Star State Embarks on a Free-Market Power Plan. Other States Watch, with California on Their Minds
Last year was a grim one for US energy markets. From the rolling blackouts in California to the collapse of industry giant Enron, the playing field - and the players - changed substantially in a mere 12 months. In both cases, regulatory lapses have come...
Unfamiliar to Canada - Lack of Roofs
Jackie Seymour doesn't have much more than her clothes, her friends, and her faith, she says, tapping her soiled fingers on a purple Bible. "We're a family here." Life with her husband in their plywood shack is lived day by day, and it's a good morning...
Uplink Nation ; Satellite-Based Services Become the Bright New Lights in the American Consumer's Constellation
Call it the ultimate remote. The satellite dish has long been considered a necessary, if somewhat unsightly, tool for people in outlying regions who want to bring home a wide range of entertainment. While satellite-based entertainment, growing since...
USA
With a battle over his budget looming in Congress, President Bush said he wants to increase food aid for the swelling number of recession victims. He proposed an 8.3 percent hike in spending on the Women, Infants, and Children program. But Sen. Edward...
World
More than 400 suspected Islamic militants were detained by Pakistani police, part of a crackdown ordered by President Pervez Musharraf to defuse the crisis with India. Musharraf banned five militant groups, among them two that India blames for an attack...
You'll Love Those National ID Cards
Today, we learn the conclusions of a special task force examining the merits of a national, tamper-proof ID card. The task force, set up by the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, is working closely with various federal agencies and...