The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 30, 1996

A Fiery Nativist Takes on No. 2 Post in New Zealand
When it comes to national politics, New Zealand frequently imports some of its brightest ideas from America. This year's bestseller here, "The Spin," a political novel written by "Anonymous," tells the inside story of the campaign that led up to the...
... and the Humanities
"The modern generation has scarcely heard of the Boston Athenaeum and has, therefore, no notion of the enchantment which lurks within its nail-studded, leather doors." The writer of these Monitor lines 55 years ago would be astonished at how today's...
Art and Money Teamed Up in the Shooting of the West
Photography and the American West grew up together. French painter Louis J. M. Daguerre's invention of a reliable, practical technique for photography was announced in 1839; the discovery of gold in California was announced in 1848. Occurring almost...
Cast Your Own Ballot for Baseball Hall of Famers
A week from today, the Baseball Hall of Fame's class of '97 will be announced in New York City. Selection will bestow the sport's highest honor upon a chosen few, or perhaps, as occurred last January, on no one at all - or at least none of the listed...
Connecting the Dots: Men Find Antidote for Anger Series: Out of Harm's Way: Countering Negative Influences. Part Four of Four. Second of Four Articles Appearing Today
It happened in an instant one Sunday afternoon. A six-year-old girl and her four-year-old brother were playing in their Minneapolis home when suddenly, the little boy punched his sister. The provocation angered their father, and without thinking, he...
Crisis Nurseries Help Parents in Tough Times Series: Out of Harm's Way: Countering Negative Influences. Part Four of Four. Third of Four Articles Appearing Today
Ray Brown seemed set up for failure. A single parent in recovery from alcohol and drug abuse, Mr. Brown had just gotten his three children back from state custody in Oregon. He had no car and few resources to support his family.To make matters worse,...
Economic and Social Reform in Chile Is Lifting All Boats
Much has been written in recent years about the success of Chile's trade-liberalization and financial-reform policies, which have resulted in Latin America's highest rate of sustained economic growth.But are the benefits of that growth being shared by...
Efforts to End Abuse Open Doors for Troubled Families Home Is Not a Haven for Millions of Children. Both Domestic Violence and Child Abuse Endanger Their Well-Being. Today Innovative Programs Are Seeking to Stabilize At-Risk Families by Supporting Each Member. Fathers Learn to Deal Constructively with Anger; Parents Get Breathing Room during Crises; Kids Find There Are Nonviolent Ways to Resolve Problems. but Sometimes Another Environment Is the Only Answer, and New Standards Are Making Children's Welfare the First Priority. Series: Out of Harm's Way: Countering Negative Influences. Part Four of Four. First of Four Articles Appearing Today
Lucretia Silas always wanted her son and daughter to have what she didn't have as a child - a father. Even though her husband beat her regularly, she endured the abuse to keep her family together.But that tenuous arrangement ended five years ago when...
First Night Makes New Year's Debut in More Cities
As the clock ticks down on New Year's Eve, a giant puppet parade will entertain revelers in Santa Rosa, Calif. Atlanta residents will paint 140 wood and fabric panels on a spiral labyrinth to depict their concept of peace, unity, and healing. And New...
Hostage Takers in Peru Seen as Vanishing Breed
The Marxist guerrillas who still hold dozens of hostages in Peru have surprised observers not only with their well-organized tactics, but also the fact such a group continues to exist at all in this day and age. Some see the crisis as a last-ditch act...
How a Dog Sled Trail Wends Its Way into a Spending Bill Hill's Agenda Is Testament to Minutiae of Governance Series: Long Arm of the Lawmakers. First in a Two-Part Series. One of One Articles Appearing Today
Among the important issues the 104th Congress dealt with this year were welfare, health care, balanced budgets - and the lack of signs along the Iditarod National Historic Trail in Alaska.Legislators also found time to consider the weighty question of...
Indonesian Critics Operate in Shadowy Margins
In Indonesia you're free to do and say what you like, but don't go too far. The government calls it "freedom with responsibility;" opponents call it repression and are campaigning for reform.Thirty years after he gained power following an abortive coup...
Letters
Linking TV and Substance AbuseNews reports such as your Dec. 19 Page 1 article, "Ratings Content of TV Programs: View From Hollywood Studio 41," accompanied by dire statistics revealing increased use of drugs and alcohol by American teenagers, make me...
Money for the Arts
The National Endowment for the Arts has to consider itself fortunate to have $99.5 million to distribute in the coming year. That's 40 percent less than it had in its last budget. But if some conservatives in Congress had their way, the agency would...
New York Sludge Loses Charm in Texas Town
Let's face it, there's nothing glamorous about New York City sludge. It smells bad, it carries copper and lead, and lawmakers there won't have it.But four years ago, this west Texas town of 650 learned that an Oklahoma company had won a six-year contract,...
Organic Farmers to Washington: Regulate Us
The labels said the bags contained organically grown beans and barley. But that's not what was inside, according to Minnesota officials.The Minnesota Attorney General's Office says that for more than a year, Glacial Ridge Foods Company, mislabeled ordinary...
Pioneered in Jeans, Customization Spreads to Shoes and Fragrances
Having a hard time finding jeans that fit? Levi Strauss & Co. will tailor a pair to your exact measurements. Always wanted to create your own signature fragrance? Garden Botanika will do it for you. And how about some custom-made shoes? Custom Foot offers...
Progress Possible in Korea, with Push from US the US and South Korea Should Offer the North Aid and Trade If It Agrees to an Arms-Control Accord
Is the mini-cold war on the Korean peninsula finally beginning to end?Pyongyang has recently cooperated in the search for United States MIAs, released an American student who had entered North Korean territory illegally, indicated a willingness to acknowledge...
Readers' Delight: Best Fiction and Nonfiction While Short Stories Are Less Artistic in 1996 Than Earlier in the Century, This Year's Essays Are the Best They've Ever Been
The Best America Essays: 1996Edited by Geoffrey C. Ward and Robert AtwanHoughton Mifflin 370 pp., $27 (cloth) $12.95 (paper) The Best American Short Stories: 1996 Edited by John Edgar Wideman and Katrina Kenison Houghton Mifflin 363 pp., $25 (cloth)...
Saturn Adapts Its Sales Strategy to Japanese Market
When General Motors Corp. conceived the idea for Saturn a decade ago, it was envisioned as a "Japan fighter." The new division would challenge the imports that were rapidly gaining US market share. Today, American motorists are buying everything Saturn's...
Sports Calendar
January 3-4Andersen Consulting World Championship of GolfThis event probably comes as close as any to determining the globe's top shotmaker. Begun only last year, the championship bears the sanction of the world's five major tours and boasts a $3.65...
States Brace for Welfare Revamp Some Play Cautious, Some Play Bold as New Deal Programs Are Phased Out
As the New Year approaches, states are bracing for big changes in their welfare systems.Bit by bit, states are entering the new federal block-grant program, called Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, in which states take a fixed sum of cash from...
Suitable Answers Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to World Events and Daily Life
When you are faced with a problem, what is your first response? Do you launch into a rehearsal of your options, the pros and cons of different actions? Oftentimes such reasoning is helpful and useful. But even the most adept problem solvers would likely...
The News in Brief
THE USAt least eight Republican Congressmen reportedly remain uncommitted on the reelection of Newt Gingrich as House Speaker. Several have said they want to hear the House ethics committee recommendation on how Gingrich should be punished before deciding...
West, Japan Want Suharto to End Special Car Deal for Son
For a "national car," Indonesia's Timor is a strange hybrid. Its 1500cc engine is made by Mazda of Japan. Its body is produced and assembled in South Korea. Only the name has truly local origins: a provocative reference to East Timor, the island Indonesia...
When a Child's Safety Is at Stake US Reconsiders the Policy Emphasis on Family Reunification to Ensure Greater Protection Series: Out of Harm's Way: Countering Negative Influences. Part Four of Four. Fourth of Four Articles Appearing Today
When a child who has been in and out of a social services agency, such as New York's Elisa Izquierdo, dies at the hands of a parent or caregiver and the media picks up the story, the results are predictable. The public demands explanations and officials...

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