The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 30, 1997

Address Quality Issue in Health Care Industry
The health care industry accounts for $1 trillion in yearly expenditures. It represents approximately 14 percent of gross domestic product. No industry of comparable size exists in our economy. Yet it operates without a systemwide framework for defining,...
ADRs Bring Foreign Investing Home Investing Internationally from the Comfort and Security of Your Local Stock Tables
With the US stock market lunging upward with increasing volatility, international stocks have regained some appeal.By diversifying abroad, you can hedge against declines in the US market. One route is through mutual funds.But there's another way you...
All That Fun Can Add Up, but Cheap Relief Is Available
Time is money, and never more so than when calculating the costs of children's activities. During the school year, at least, budgeting for ballet, piano, or soccer classes requires an early version of the computer program "Quicken" to balance the costs...
At-Risk Kids Get the Key to Early Learning Success PREP Program Turns Poor Language and Social Skills Around
During its first summer three years ago, a free tutoring program for minority children from Nashville's poorest housing projects made a key mistake. It picked a location across the hall from regular public school summer classes.Public school students...
Care Labels Get Less Wordy Consumers Will Find New Symbolism Hanging on the Clothing Racks
The next time you look at the care label in your new dress or sports coat, you may get a lesson in symbolism.Starting tomorrow, apparel sold in the United States will carry symbols to indicate how to care for garments.The system of symbols was developed...
Case May Clarify Rules for Using Informants Judge in Boston Mafia Case Wades into Murky Area of How Law Enforcement Supervises Its 'Helpers.'
Hearings aren't going the government's way at federal court in Boston. Increasingly, it seems as if the FBI, not five alleged mobsters, is on trial, as the court scrutinizes the agency's use of informants to bring down the New England Mafia.The bizarre...
China, Trade, and Rights
Congress's annual wrestling match over most-favored-nation (MFN) trading status for China yielded the same result last week that it has every year since 1980. Opponents again failed to rally enough support to block the president's granting of such status,...
Coalition Considers Ways to Broaden Religious Rights after Court's Decision, a Constitutional Amendment Is One Possible Alternative to the Religious Freedom Restoration Act
For religious Americans, especially those of minority denominations, an air of uncertainty hangs over the right to practice their faith.Will Jehovah's Witnesses once again be forced to take a loyalty oath as a condition for employment in California?...
Containing a Kosovo Crisis A Special Envoy Could Help Free Albanians from Serb Apartheid
The long-predicted crisis in Kosovo seems fast approaching. Public anger, political stalemate, and international neglect are pushing the Albanian population in the Serb-dominated province toward a showdown with the regime of Serb President Slobodan Milosevic...
Court's Tour De Force Term Rulings Boost States' Rights and Power of High Tribunal Itself
After years of tentativeness and ideological drift, the Supreme Court under Chief Justice William Rehnquist is emerging as a distinct and powerful voice in national affairs - perhaps the most powerful since the Warren court in the 1960s.While divisions...
EU's Umbrella Still Not Large Enough for New Members
The new democracies of Central and Eastern Europe may be more ready for the European Union than the EU is for them.That is the feeling after the EU summit held here June 16 and 17. EU officials have acknowledged their own work in preparation for enlargement...
Finally Free to Vote for a Mayor, Mexico City May Elect a Gadfly Left-Leaning Cardenas Is Free of the Scandals and Economic Crises That Have Plagued the Ruling Party
Gesturing to the east, toward the volcano Popocatepet that has been grumbling and spitting ash for the past few weeks, Ricardo Ledesma says, "The voters are like El Popo. We're angry." The Mexico City tile-layer adds, "And when we enter the voting booth,...
'Henry VIII' Wraps Up Shakespeare Marathon the Bard's Last Play Is Respectable but Not Thrilling Capstone to N.Y.C. Festival
'Tis ten to one this play can never please/ All that are here....Those words, from the epilogue to "Henry VIII," must have occurred many times to the producers of the the Shakespeare Marathon. The marathon is Joseph Papp Public Theater/New York Shakespeare...
How to Read an Aztec Sculpture the Monitor Invites You to Sit in on a Series of Conversations with Curators at Major Art Museums on Choice Objects in Their Collections Series: Curators Tour, the Art Institute of Chicago, Last in a Series
This Aztec Coronation Stone, says Richard Townsend of The Art Institute of Chicago, makes sense only when "you understand how to read it."Fortunately, Dr. Townsend, curator of the Department of African and Amerindian Art since 1981, can read Aztec sculpture...
Kids and Summer: Pencil in Time to Daydream Free Play Is an Elusive Concept for Many Children of Increasingly Busy Parents, but It's as Important as Swimming Lessons
When Sherman Oaks mom Nathalie Miller was young, her summers of free play stretched before her like the vast fields of the farm in France where she grew up. "I never went to camp. My mother would open the door and we'd be gone for the day, completely...
Letters
Precautions Against 'Loose Nukes'In the opinion-page article "Russian 'Loose Nukes' - a Myth That Distorts US Policy" (June 16), the author makes some excellent points with regard to safeguarding Russian nuclear weapons and materials.But the $400 million...
Many Who Flocked to Florida Now Seek Paradise Elsewhere GOODBYE, PALMS
Paradise is not lost, but it's looking a little tainted.For years, millions of migrants to Florida have found bliss among the arching palms of this sun-dappled state. But growing crime, congestion, and pollution - with the occasional hurricane thrown...
Mexico City: A Pinata Full of Big Troubles - and Many Delights
Voters often wonder why politicians would even want the elected posts they seek. In the case of Mexico City, that bewilderment seems all the more understandable.The rapid population growth, pollution, crime, faulty services, congestion, lack of clean...
Nation's Newest Park Is Island Unto Itself
As the ferry putters its last few feet to the pier at Georges Island, the Boston skyline fades from view.The neck-craning steel and glass of downtown - only four miles distant - is replaced by a rocky coast and the expanse of cobalt-blue sea stretching...
No Fatal Error Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
The e-mail message I'd sent came bouncing back, marked "undeliverable." Written on it in several places were the words fatal error, followed by many exclamation points.Intimidating as that message was, all I needed to do, I found, was remove an extra...
No Vetoed Veto, for Now
The US Supreme Court decided not to veto the line-item veto - at least not for now. The lawmakers challenging that brand-new presidential power had no legal standing to do so, the court said, because the veto hadn't yet been exercised and therefore no...
Shadowy Guerrilla Leader Still Plays Key Role in Cambodia Pol Pot's Alleged Capture Has Exacerbated the Ongoing Rivalry between the Nation's Feuding Co-Premiers
So where is Pol Pot?Nearly 20 years after the leader of the Khmer Rouge fled into the Cambodian jungle, his presence looms over this Southeast Asian nation of 10 million.Often known as the architect of the "killing fields," which led to the deaths of...
Soulful U2 Contradicts Itself with Tour of Neon and Glitter
"So what do you think of all this?" U2's lead singer, Bono, laughingly asks the capacity crowd of 56,000 as he waves his hand at a 40-foot disco-ball lemon, a $6 million, 170-foot long video screen, and a towering golden arch. "This is where we work,...
'Speed 2' Director Reflects on the Course of Action Flicks Interview JAN DE BONT
At a time when many big-screen blockbusters think entertaining the audience is the same as assaulting it, Jan De Bont's pictures stand out for a simple reason: They're fun.Moviegoers learned this when he made his directorial debut with "Speed," about...
Testing Man's Limits on Mir - and beyond This Week Marks Several Historic Events in Humanity's Effort to Explore the Frontier of Space
As humanity extends its reach into space, seldom in the annals of 20th-century exploration have events converged to focus on a frontier as they are doing now.The promise - and perils - are seen in a stunning range of missions under way. This Friday,...
The News in Brief
The USLas Vegas promoters scrambled to defend the city's image after at least 11 people were hurt in a stampede following the heavyweight championship fight between Evander Holyfield and Mike Tyson. A spokesman for the MGM Grand hotel said a bottle being...
This Time, Nothing but the Real Thing
I meticulously went over the contents of the cellophane bag for the third time, but the "spreader connectors" referred to in the instructions were not there. The manufacturers apparently had forgotten to package these small plastic parts, essential to...
Tying the Knot? Avoid 'Until Debt Do You Part'
With the wedding approaching, you've chosen the flowers, been fitted for formal wear, and planned everything from seating arrangements to your honeymoon.You may, however, have neglected one of the most important elements: a plan for managing personal...
Wei Jingsheng: Freedom's Voice for a Billion Chinese
THE COURAGE TO STAND ALONE: LETTERS FROM PRISON AND OTHER WRITINGSBy Wei JingshengViking, 283 pp., $23.95 We watched from the upper floor of the double-decker bus as a tightly packed line, several hundred Chinese men and women, walked in silent defiance....
Women's Pioneering Role in Electronic Music
The release of "Women in Electronic Music - 1977," a CD on the CRI label, is engaging proof that women have known how to bend high technology to their expressive purposes for decades.As Laurie Spiegel, one of the seven composers represented on this groundbreaking...
Worlds Meet in a Song for Hong Kong Gala 'Heaven, Earth, and Man' Is a Unique Piece of Music That Celebrates a Historic Event and Mixes Sounds from the East and West
Tan Dun, a Chinese composer who lives in exile in New York, seems to have been an unlikely figure to be chosen to write a symphony to mark Hong Kong's return to China. After all, he left Beijing more than a decade ago after his music was targeted in...