The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 16, 2002

A Circulating Beam of Light as a Way to Time Travel ; Ronald Mallett's Physics Career Grew from an Early Fascination with an Offbeat Concept
Ronald Mallett has wanted to travel in time ever since, as a boy, he first read "The Time Machine," by H. G. Wells. The science- fiction novel suggested to him the possibility of returning to the past to save his father, who died at 33, when young Ronald...
A Consumer's Credo: Use It All
I happened to be reading my toothpaste tube the other day when I almost dropped my teeth: "For best results, squeeze from the bottom and flatten as you go up." How long has that line been there? I don't remember it from sixth grade, which may have been...
A Key Race in Defining Democrats ; in Pennsylvania, a Clash of Two Visions in Gubernatorial Primary Race Shows Party Split
Crawling up the narrow cobblestone streets of Philadelphia's historic Germantown neighborhood, the red-white-and-blue bus, plastered with a giant likeness of gubernatorial candidate Ed Rendell, looks jarringly out of place. But as it pulls up in front...
Beef Tenderloin and a Brouhaha ; GOP Fundraiser Takes in Millions, but Democrats Accuse Bush of Exploiting 9/11 for Political Gain
The war on terror and other crises haven't prevented President Bush from tending to his night job as his party's fundraiser-in- chief. In fact, they may be helping him. The annual GOP gala featuring the president this week raised $33 million - easily...
Cory Booker, Standard Bearer of the New Politics
Even before the ballots were cast Tuesday in Newark, N.J. - home of the hottest mayoral race in the country - the lasting result was clear: Cory Booker had already won. In the end, 33-year-old Mr. Booker garnered 47 percent of the votes, losing to four-term...
Don't Know Much about
Seems more people could be taking to heart Longfellow's phrase, "The love of learning, the sequestered nooks, and all the sweet serenity of books." Recent studies show a serious lack of understanding among Americans about history, science, and foreign...
Egotism Fortissimo ; the World's Worst Biographer Tells All about the World's Worst Composer
Shakespeare claimed, "Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them." And some, he should have added, chase greatness like a junkyard dog and never catch it. Such was the case with Simon Silber, the avant-garde...
Flexibility in Nuclear Pact Creates Its Own Limitations ; the Treaty's Impact Is Dulled by No Rules for a Timetable or Destruction of Warheads
While politically important, this week's US-Russian accord to remove thousands of nuclear warheads from operational deployment is unlikely to make the world a markedly safer place. Experts say that the Bush administration deserves credit for simply achieving...
In Colleges, a Boost for Affirmative Action ; Appeals Panel Lets Law School Opt for Integration over Color-Blind Admissions
A federal court ruling endorsing the use of race as a factor in admissions at the University of Michigan Law School gives a major boost to advocates of affirmative action. At the very least, it promises to slow the momentum that in recent years had swung...
In Once-Brutal War Zone, a Model Arises
Satia Bangura, a stocky woman with a tight bun on her head and shiny black patent-leather shoes on her feet, never seems to smile. Her job, she snorts, does not require it. As chief immigration officer at Sierra Leone's international airport, she has...
Israel's New West Bank 'Border' ; A Human Rights Report Released Monday Says Israeli Settlements Control 42 Percent of West Bank
It may not be the Great Wall of China, but the three huge rings of barbed wire installed recently by the Israeli army here have far- reaching implications. The wire, on a pastoral slope lined with olive trees, is aimed at preventing Palestinians from...
Japan's Island of Longevity ; Big-City Stress and Fast Food Are Threatening the Way of Life in a Village That Produces Scores of Healthy Seniors
You could never accuse Ushi Okushima of acting her age. She giggles, she gossips, she toils for hours in the fields, and strolls along the seashore. It is not bad for a 103-year-old great grandmother - 24 times over - who was born in the 19th century...
Keeping College Doors Open
The US legal system is now a step closer to settling the question of whether university admissions policies that favor racial or ethnic minorities are constitutional. For the moment, however, the question is murkier than ever. A US court of appeals in...
Letters
Pentagon continues its pursuit of greener methods Regarding your editorial "Keep the Pentagon Green" (May 2): Our military's environmental record is one of remarkable achievement. Hundreds of contaminated sites have been cleaned up, natural and cultural...
Little Fights to Maintain a Big Power
America may have started out a republic but it is now an empire. That is the conclusion of a growing body of writers who argue that the United States must abandon its traditional squeamishness about foreign adventures and embrace the imperial mantle....
Lucas Improves 'Star Wars' Franchise with 'Clones'
"Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones" is the best "Star Wars" installment since "The Empire Strikes Back," hurtling along so quickly that you hardly notice the many moments when the story fails to make sense - even on its own fantastical terms....
Lunch Money Dilemmas: M&Ms or Meatloaf?
Given the choice for lunch, most children would choose: A. M&Ms and Diet Coke. B. Meatloaf and steamed carrots. Duh. That's a no-brainer, says Houston seventh-grader, Jackson Hime, whose mother recently resorted to setting up a school- cafeteria tab...
Oil Melts Enmity between Syria and Iraq ; Syria Voted in Favor of UN Sanctions on Iraq Tuesday, but Argued Vociferously against Them
Iraq is turning old enemies in the Middle East into new friends, seeking regional allies in a bid to complicate Washington's plans to oust Saddam Hussein. Using smuggled oil as a lever, say diplomats here, Baghdad is reversing 30 years of hostility to...
Rebuilding Trust in Charity
Even as the Red Cross and United Way approach the finish line in disbursing funds to victims of Sept. 11, public trust in charitable organizations continues to sour. Since September, the number of Americans expressing no confidence in charitable organizations...
Remains of the Cold War Melting ; Russia Deepens Its Integration with Former Rival NATO, as President Carter Tries to Pry Open US Doors to Cuba
The cold war has been over for years. But it may be only now - after a decade of false starts, tentative handshakes, and bruised feelings on both sides of the old Iron Curtain - that the lukewarm peace that will replace it is finally developing. Since...
Rime of the Modern Mariner ; Albatrosses Can Fly over Everything but Environmental Destruction
Humans and albatrosses have a lot in common. We both live for many decades, possibly a century. Our reproductive patterns are similar. Albatrosses take as long as 13 years to mature, engage in courtships that can last two years or more, and raise a single...
Show Me That Again and I'll Scream ; the Fight to Rescue Iconic Art from Chronic Overexposure
Michelangelo's "David." Van Gogh's "Sunflowers." Munch's "The Scream." Leonardo's "Mona Lisa." What makes works of art like these into universally popular icons? And what happens to them when ubiquity and familiarity - pushed to extremes by endless reproduction...
The Hut Has a Life of Its Own
Our only guest book occupies a small, one-room hut tucked in a forest that canopies the invisible boundary between our 80-acre farm and a city nature preserve. The hut is technically ours. I bought it at an auction for $10 (it had been the laundry shed...
The Rules of Justice Are Different When the Court's on Campus
It wasn't that long ago - the early 1980s. Ed Stoner happened to be in the admissions office of Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, when a student approached the dean's secretary and asked for a copy of the school's code of conduct. Without a word, the...
We Come Home to the Forest
Just before the excavator rumbled up the dirt road and began digging the pit that would become our new basement, I paused at a stark realization: "This land will never be the same again." An unanticipated tragedy loomed. We had first become acquainted...

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