The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 14, 1999

A City Shares Jordan's Legacy of Joy as Michael Jordan Retires from the NBA, Chicagoans Reflect Onlosing Their Sure Thing
For Michael Jordan, there is a certain freedom that comes in playing basketball. He once explained it like this: "The basketball court for me, during a game, is the most peaceful place I can imagine. I truly feel less pressure there than any place I...
Aid Is No Substitute for Good Government
What should the west do if the hard-pressed central governments in countries like Indonesia or Russia collapse in on themselves? One good source of guidance in such crises is to review the record of Western intervention during the African "failed state"...
A Man Who Transcended His Sport
Millions of fans dreamed right up until the last minute, but their fantasy announcement - "In a surprise turnabout, Michael Jordan says he will remain in the NBA" - never came. It was about as likely as Saddam Hussein opening a charm school or Microsoft's...
An Invitation to Brush Up on Manners in These Harried Times, a Massachusetts City Makes a Push (but a Politeone) to Revive Civility
At the melrose middle School cafeteria, students plunk down their trays of pizza and chips on tables covered in white linen, complete with cloth napkins to wipe their mouths. The formal lunch was part of a campaign by one Massachusetts city to maintain...
A Prince and Hid Palace Have Their Price the Days of Empire Have Long since Passed for This Maharajah - His Role in Modern India Means Home Is Now a Museum and Hotel
In 1971, his highness Maharajah Gaj Singh II, a freshly minted Oxford University grad, found himself aboard a train bound for home - unsure of his future or that of his people. An amendment to India's Constitution had just removed the last remaining...
At Last, the Facts Move to Forefront as the Trial of President Clinton Begins, Both Sides Must Zero Inon Evidence for Two Impeachment Charges
As 100 United States senators sit in solemn judgment, the matter of President Bill Clinton and former White House intern Monica Lewinsky has at last entered its final stage: a focused and direct confrontation over evidence. For months, the affair has...
A Trucker Takes to the Open Road - on Foot Larry McMurtry Concludes the Trilogy That Began with 'The Last PictureShow.'
DUANE'S DEPRESSED By Larry McMurtry Simon & Schuster 432 pp., $26 Ever since the Pilgrims left England, Americans have loved stories about people who wander away from it all. In "Walden," Henry David Thoreau left his family's pencil factory and went...
Britain Orders Screening of Would-Be Nannies Two Court Cases Led to Rules, Released Tuesday, Demanding Background Checks
Britain's nannies, estimated to number 100,000, will face tougher controls as the government seeks to reassure parents looking to hire someone to take care of their children. Under the new rules, any agency providing nannies will be urged to apply...
Discovery of Hidden Fall in Tibet Is a Watery Jewel
Plunging along the boundary between two colliding slabs of the earth's crust, one of Asia's mightiest river systems has yielded up the last of its hidden jewels - a waterfall that has tantalized Western explorers for much of this century. Written off...
Eagerness to Scorn Earns Firm Reproof
THE DEATH OF ADAM: ESSAYS ON MODERN THOUGHT By Marilynne Robinson Houghton Mifflin 254 pp., $24 This splendidly provocative set of essays might, with equal justice, have been given the subtitle "Against Shallowness." What animates Marilynne Robinson's...
Etc
DOING THE WRITE THING the ceremony was solemn as members of the US Senate - watched by millions of Americans on TV - filed up to sign their pledge of impartiality in the impeachment trial of President Clinton. But the aura might have been a little less...
Federal Overstepping
The 10th amendment to the United States Constitution says that "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people." During the last few decades,...
Harry Potter Swoops into Great Adventures
HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER'S STONE By J.K. Rowling Scholastic 320 pp., $16.95 Ages 9-12 There's something strange about Harry Potter. Sweaters shrink when he's near. Boa constrictors are mysteriously freed when he visits the zoo. Even his hair grows...
How Did We Ever Live without Them
When the freezing water reached her waist, numbing her legs and causing her feet to shake uncontrollably, Brenna Garnett found what she needed. She had braked hard to avoid an animal, hit a tree, and skidded down a steep embankment into a creek. She...
How Ethical Is Testing Pesticides on People, EPA Asks Using Human Subjects Will Make Chemicals Safer, Say supporters.But Critics Worry about Potential Side Effects
For years, companies have tested pesticides on animals to ensure chemicals meet federal environmental standards. Soon, however, it may become increasingly common for humans to join mice at the lab dining table. The US Environmental Protection Agency...
Letters
Zedillo and the Zapatistas Congratulations to the Monitor for being one of few major newspapers to recognize Mexico's unresolved conflict over indigenous rights, on the occasion of the fifth anniversary of the Zapatista uprising ("Close family encounter...
Looking at Us Looking at Them
In his new book, "Life, the Movie" (Knopf), film and culture critic Neal Gabler proposes that our insatiable hunger for entertainment has overwhelmed private and public life. It has transformed every aspect of American culture - from religion and art...
Moses Biography Looks for 'Proof' but Misses the Man
MOSES: A LIFE By Jonathan Kirsch Ballantine 415 pp., $27.50 Moses is in the public eye these days. While the American impeachment drama unfolded, Time magazine put him on their cover (Dec. 14), asking, "Who was Moses?" DreamWorks has animated him into...
Olympic Bribery Scandal Reverberates around World It Sullies Image of Utah and Will Likely Bring Changes in Siteselection Process
From Salt Lake City to Lausanne, Switzerland, the bribery scandal surrounding the 2002 Winter Games is rocking the top echelons of the Olympic movement and will likely usher in broad changes in how host cities are chosen in the future. If nothing else,...
Remembering Latchkey Kids
The clinton administration has commenced its yearly process of launching policy proposals destined, presumably, for a spot in the State of the Union Address - if not actual enactment. Among them is a plan to triple federal funding for after-school programs...
Rounding the City on Two Wheels
I ride my bicycle to Lincoln Center, lock it to a bicycle rack, and do several errands. Fifteen minutes later, I return. I can't believe my eyes. Only the lock and bicycle frame remain. The wheels, seat, and lights are gone. A thief has been at work....
Saddam Finds Few Friends among Arab Leaders
Despite sending out major appeals for support to his neighbors, Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein is finding that few are listening. Instead, the foreign ministers of at least 10 Arab states are expected to meet in Cairo Jan. 24 to discuss - among other things...
Settling Accounts in the Aftermath of Mass Atrocities
The last years of this century have seen the best of days and the worst of days: from the jubilant fall of the Berlin Wall to the brutalities of ethnic cleansing in Bosnia, from the exhilarating end of apartheid in South Africa to horrific massacres...
Testing Limits on Heading West for Welfare High Court Considers California's Right to Restrict Welfarechecks to New Residents
If you were on welfare in Texas receiving $188 a month and found that California welfare pays $565 a month, would you move to California? That is the kind of hypothetical question that led to passage of a controversial California law to restrict the...
The Itty-Bitty Bird Who Ruled Our Roost
One evening as the family was bustling about in the kitchen preparing dinner, our daughter let out a shriek, "Coco's laid an egg! She's laid an egg in my hair!" Sure enough, there in Kit's long red hair, curled in her hand to make a nest, Coco had indeed...
The Monitor's Guide to Religion Bestsellers
The Monitor's quarterly review of bestselling religion books offers a one-stop opportunity to survey the resurgent interest in religion and spirituality. 1. CONVERSATIONS WITH GOD, BOOK 3, by N. Walsch, Hampton Roads, $22.95 The theme of this final...
The Technological Warp If Nixon Had the Internet, Larry King, and TV Satellites
If Richard Nixon had had today's communications tools available to him 25 years ago, could he have convinced America he was doing a good job and therefore avoided his certain impeachment? Consider President Clinton, who enjoys a 70 percent job approval...
Today's Story Line:
One sideshow worth watching in the Iraq-US crisis is the verbal attack and counterattack between Saddam Hussein and two Arab nations, Saudi Arabia and Egypt. Both sides are playing to Arab public opinion, which may influence events in the region. Quote...
Torched Churches Heat Up India Anti-Christian Violence by Militant Hindus Strengthensaccusations against Ruling Nationalists
Christians account for scarcely more than 2 percent of the population in India, but to the militant Hindus who have attacked nearly two dozen churches here since Christmas, they are a threat. In addition to torching churches, vandals have desecrated...
Turn on the Light Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
First thing in the morning, I like to open the blinds and let in the light. Even at night, people don't like to be totally in the dark if they're trying to find their way around. The tiniest night light helps. Not too long ago, we were in a part...
USA
Two new polls recorded continued public support for President Clinton. In a CNN/USA Today/Gallup survey, 63 percent said they opposed removing the president from office. In an ABC poll, the figure was 65 percent. Similar percentages (67 percent and...
World
World Financial Markets were in an uproar after the government of Brazil took the first steps in devaluing the nation's currency, the real, by 8 percent. The Bovespa stock index, South America's largest, has lost 13 percent of its value since Jan....
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