The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 4, 2002

A 'Lovecat' Calls for Compassion in the Cubicles
Nice smart people succeed. So says Yahoo! executive and self-proclaimed "lovecat" Tim Sanders, author of "Love is the Killer App." A killer app, in dotcom jargon, is a great new idea - or application - that becomes so popular it transforms or destroys...
An Iraq War Could Bring Gas-Pump Gloom ; as US Considers Action against Saddam Hussein, Reliance on Imported Oil Grows
Waging war means sacrifice. But so far, at least concerning the gas pump, the war on terrorism hasn't asked much sacrifice of America's consumers. Gasoline is cheap and plentiful, as America's gas-guzzling SUVs, proudly flying the Stars and Stripes,...
A War on Russian Literature, One Book at a Time ; A Book-Exchange Program That Encourages Readers to Trade in Certain Books for More 'Patriotic' Ones Reminds Some of Soviet Times
From the street corners here, a group of activists is waging a battle against what they say are the pernicious effects of modern literature. "Democracy doesn't mean the open sale of books with foul language, indecent thoughts about one's country, or...
Clarifying the 'Tax-Free' Nature of Gifts
Q: In your column of Feb. 25, you stated that "donors are allowed to give [gifts] up to $11,000 tax-free." Tax-free to whom? As you mention, the recipient pays no tax. Can it be that the $11,000 is totally tax-free? Can the donor deduct the gift from...
Consumers in Crossfire of Labels' War on Piracy
When Karen DeLise bought a compact disc by country singer Charley Pride last year, she was unhappy to discover that the CD wouldn't play in the CD drive in her computer. That meant that the songs on the album couldn't be converted into computer files...
Enron May Push Regulatory Wave across Free Enterprise
Enron Corp.'s failure has smudged the public image of capitalism.It has left Wall Street "with a couple of black eyes," says William Freund, a former chief economist for the New York Stock Exchange. Critics talk of "crony capitalism." Corporate executives...
Enron's Ex-Role: Model of Ethics ; for the Gurus of Socially Responsible Investing, What Lessons from a Tarnished Star?
Perhaps the ultimate irony about Enron Corp. is how it charmed ethical investors, even the pros, for so long. The Houston-based energy giant not only said the right things, it also invested in solar energy, addressed questionable labor practices at overseas...
For Riordan, a Shrinking California Dream ; the Former L.A. Mayor's Squandered Lead in Tomorrow's Primary for Governor Complicates GOP Hope to Lead the State
When Richard Riordan announced his candidacy for California governor, his position looked enviable. The popular former Los Angeles mayor was well set to face Democratic Gov. Gray Davis, beleaguered by an electric-power management fiasco of epic proportion....
Home, for Me, Is Anchored in the Wild
For four years, from mid-spring through early autumn, I lived outdoors almost continually in mountain forests. I worked on blister- rust control under contract with the United States Forest Service. With hand tools, I uprooted ribes bushes to try to...
How Bin Laden Got Away ; A Day-by-Day Account of How Osama Bin Laden Eluded the World's Most Powerfulmilitary Machine
All 1,000 of the regional tribal leaders rose to their feet and shouted "Zindibad, Osama!" ("Long Live Osama!"). The Al Qaeda chief placed his right hand over his heart, the ethnic Pashtun sign for being honored, while 15 of his elite guards flanked...
How I Began My Lifelong Walk with Henry Thoreau
"I know what your trouble is," my wife called when I entered the house one wintry afternoon after working two hours in my greenhouse."What's that?" I asked. "You have spring fever," she said. Actually, she was wrong, even though we were experiencing...
Index-Linked CDs: Still Low Risk, They Climb with Stocks ; Index-Linked Versions Have Potential to Outperform Traditional Cousins, with Little Risk
Bruce Sickel has never thought of himself as a Wall Street guru, selling the intricacies of the US securities market to small savers. But Mr. Sickel, chief financial officer of Premier Bank in Doylestown, Pa., is helping bring the stock market to small...
Indian Government Struggles to Maintain Order ; Continuing Riots Test Hindu-Led Coalition's Credibility
As the fiery communal riots in the Indian state of Gujarat shift from the cities to the villages, the Hindu-led central government has begun to assess the damage to India's image and its own ability to govern. The death toll thus far is more than 400,...
In N. Ireland, Census Hints at Shifting Political Equation ; Demographers Say the Number of Catholics and Protestants Will Be Even within Two Decades
In the mainly Protestant Oldpark neighborhood of north Belfast, newly renovated houses stand silent and empty, waiting for families who will never come. Across the nearby 12-foot-high brick fence, the so-called peaceline, children in the Catholic Ardoyne...
In Ozarks, Drilling Debate Isn't about Oil ; the Search for Lead Ore Sparks a Familiar Jobs-versus-Environment Debate
When Dale Brooks says he doesn't want the clatter of drilling in his backyard, he really does mean his backyard. After spending a career in St. Louis, Mr. Brooks returned to this corner of the Ozarks, his birthplace, after retirement, buying a 220- acre...
In the Pipeline ; What's New and Maybe Useful
Talking toy for Tabby Many people speak quite earnestly to their dogs and cats, and in full sentences. But most pet owners also know that it's the tone that conveys the meaning, along with the familiarity of voice. That's the thinking behind one of the...
Letters
No right to spotlight grieving families Regarding "Grieving in the media spotlight" (Feb. 25, Opinion): I am revolted by the media mentality that thinks it is important or decent to ask how individuals feel about heinous crimes that have been inflicted...
New Economy Endures, and Whole Economy Benefits ; Continued Spending - from PCs to E-Valentines - Bodes Well for Rising US Productivity in Years Ahead
On Valentine's Day, Hallmark.com saw a fourfold jump in traffic from the year before as Americans used the Internet to send words of love and gifts to relatives and friends. It's a heart-throbbing sign of life in a high-tech economy that is apparently...
Refreshing Your Memories ; How to Convert Old Albums, Tapes, and Photos into Long-Lasting Digital Formats That Are Easily Stored - and Compatible with Today's High-Tech Toys
They are the fossils of family entertainment. Inside millions of homes across the country, dusty boxes hold invaluable archives of household media treasures. Among them: 8-mm. films and VHS tapes, LP music albums, and glossy (if often fading) photos....
Soft Debate Surfaces on Terror War ; Democrats Raise Doubts, Risking 'Unpatriotic' Label
Some five months into the war on terrorism, the first stirrings of discontent are appearing in Washington over how far to expand the conflict and even over basic goals of the campaign. Some Democratic lawmakers on Capitol Hill have been taken aback by...
Support for Sharon Strategy Flags ; over the Weekend, at Least 20 Israelis Were Killed, and Some 35 Palestinians in Circle of Violence
Protected by an armored truck and a score of watchful Israeli soldiers, Lt. Col. Chaem Livani, laden with combat gear, stood on an eerily still avenue in the Balata refugee camp and reflected on the goals of his mission: stopping Palestinian suicide...
The Hunt for Al Qaeda: Key Dates
The hunt for Al Qaeda: key dates Oct. 7 US attacks Afghanistan The campaign in Afghanistan, 90 percent of which is controlled by the Taliban regime, begins with US and British aircraft and submarine attacks. The allied forces target key cities and camps...
US Antiterrorist Aid to Tbilisi Rankles Russians ; Up to 200 US Troops Are Expected to Arrive in Georgia by Mid-March
Georgian police have begun to surround the rugged Pankisi Gorge where suspected Al Qaeda fighters may be hiding out, while Georgia's Army awaits the arrival later this month of up to 200 US elite troops who will provide training and equipment for a full...
US Is Not the World's Hub
Some see globalism as a network with an American hub and spokes reaching out to the rest of the world. There is some truth in this picture, as the United States is central to four forms of globalization: economic (the United States has the largest capital...
Why American Troops Are Needed in Georgia
America's antiterror focus has shifted to the Pankisi Gorge on the border between the Republic of Georgia and Chechnya. Two weeks ago, America's war on terror took a dramatic turn when two US military planes landed in the Georgian capital of Tiblisi...

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.