The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 5, 2002

9/11 Depictions: Cathartic or Exploitive? ; A Wave of Movies and Documentaries Emerge That Some Say Are Insensitive
In New York, "The Producers" is getting some competition as the most sought-after theater ticket. Nightly, crowds are jamming into the foyer of an off-Broadway theater that, just 6 months ago, had been contemplating permanently closing its curtains because...
An Alternative Route into a Top-Pick School
Katie Newhouse didn't know quite what she was looking at when she opened the envelope from New York University last spring. Was it a rejection letter, or an invitation? The Bostonian had her heart set on NYU, her mother's alma mater. And when its College...
Broaden the Pool for Civil Service
When I first started working for the US Department of Agriculture 38 years ago, I was one of thousands who signed up for a life-long commitment to public service. I felt the government not only provided challenging work for a good cause, but also offered...
Clock Is Ticking for Remedial Students ; in a Closely Watched Move, a State University System Pushes out Those Who Don't Master the Basics
When remedial writing instructor Adrienne Peek pauses to think about the hundreds of California State University (CSU) students she has labored to help write at a college level, one stands out below the rest. "When I met him, he had about 100 course...
Filipinos Swap Guns for Rakes ; US-Funded Seaweed Farms Offer a Model of Economic Revival for Militant Regions
They used to call him the Singing Commander for the guitar he'd exchange for his M-16 after a hard day on patrol in the jungles of the southern Philippines. But Haji Abdullah Usman says "Seaweed King" better suits him now. His transformation from Muslim...
Homeless Haven Rethinks Tolerance
It takes only a few blocks to realize that street people and panhandlers are as much a part of this gilded hill city as the Golden Gate, the Presidio, or the striking views of Alcatraz from Russian Hill. San Francisco belongs to them as much as it does...
Kids Get a Boat's-Eye View of New York
A new group of Navy Junior ROTC kids is out on a windy Wednesday afternoon, 20 freshmen and sophomores from New York's High School of Graphic Arts. They're at Pier 84 well before 3:30 p.m., blue lifejackets cinched tight. A swirl of Spanish and English,...
Meet an Eight-Legged Actor ; If You Think the Oscar Nominees Are Good at Pretending, Wait till You Hear What This Octopus Can Do
At first, it's just a lump creeping across the sand. Then it speeds up. It flattens its body, pulling all eight arms in tight. Instead of jetting like an octopus, it moves its body in a wave. What is this thing? An octopus or a flatfish? Several years...
Oil Inflames Colombia's Civil War ; Bush Seeks $98 Million to Help Bogota Battle Guerrilla Pipeline Saboteurs
From the air, the Cano Limon pipeline is invisible. The 480-mile tube is buried 6 feet below ground, but its route through the rolling Colombian prairie is marked by a swathe of black oil slicks and burned ground, the result of repeated bomb attacks...
On the Red-Truck Tour of Florida with Janet Reno
Tucked in among a row of flimsy houses and cluttered yards overhung with Spanish moss, the Wilhelmina Johnson Community Center seems almost deserted. Although the candidate is due to arrive at any minute, the small building, in an African-American neighborhood,...
Politically Correct ; Future Campaign Managers Learn That Politics Doesn't Have to Be a Dirty Business
Their candidate is in trouble. A reporter has discovered that the pol lied about his credentials, and now the scribe is calling, on deadline, for a response. The threat of a campaign meltdown looms. One team of campaign managers recommends that their...
P.S. Dad Tweaked Paragraph Three
It's not a foolproof way of getting the real Ms. Jones to please stand up. But admissions officers at Duke University are attempting to stay a step ahead in the personal-essays game. Within the pressure cooker world of college applications, teens and...
Reinventing 'Normalcy'
The death and destruction of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, then the anthrax scare, and who knows what next have shaken Americans to the core. To allay the fear, and deny the terrorists' objective of miring us in it, we have been advised since last...
Scaling Back Tuition Hikes
Federal taxpayers provide some $65 billion a year in loans, grants, and tax credits to help students attend college, no matter what tuition must be paid. But what if that huge government largess could be used as an incentive for higher education to help...
Teen Ambassadors Meet the Real Ones at Model UN
With thundering applause and chants of "Kofi, Kofi," you'd think the 3,000 high-schoolers from 96 countries who gathered in The Hague last month were greeting a rock star. Instead, the man of fame was Kofi Annan, the UN secretary- general and Nobel Peace...
The Political Fallout from a Nuclear-Waste Decision ; Republicans Face Potential Losses in Nevada, a Swing State, after Bush's Ruling on Yucca Mt
President Bush's recent decision to make Yucca Mountain the nation's nuclear-waste storehouse is settling across Nevada's political landscape like a mushroom cloud. The move has sparked renewed fears among residents. And there's evidence this is improving...
Turf Wars, Ethnic Rifts Plague Afghan North and East
Even as American troops and allied Afghan fighters conduct their heaviest assault so far this year against a determined group of Taliban and Al Qaeda forces, surging ethnic tensions and jockeying warlords are undermining dreams of unity and peace elsewhere...
US, Allies in a Riskier Kind of War ; in a Shift in Strategy, US Troops Escalate a Brutal Ground Battle against Al Qaeda and Taliban Forces in the Mountains
For months, US-led forces in Afghanistan have fought what many experts dubbed a new "Afghan model" kind of war, combining air power, proxy forces, and US special operations units. Now, suddenly, the US and its allies are in the fray of an old- fashioned...
Want Smaller High Schools? the Public's Not So Sure
"Shrink the schools" has become a rallying cry in certain education-reform circles. Spurred by the view that smaller schools can help more students stay on track, districts from Chicago to Oakland, Calif., are setting up small schools or splitting giant...
When Teachers Skirt Tough Issues
It began as a nagging suspicion during Kathy Simon's years as a high school English teacher: that she and her colleagues weren't teaching what really mattered. A discussion of "Macbeth" helped confirm her concern. After a student dutifully recited the...
Zimbabwe Vote: Land vs. Law and Order ; Redistribution of Land Resonates with President Mugabe's Backers in Run Up to Saturday's Election
For Jerry Mugabe, a Harare hawker who waited in the hot midday sun this weekend to hear his president speak, Zimbabwe's coming election is about one thing and one thing only: land. "He is good for the people," Mr. Mugabe said of President Robert Mugabe...
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