The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 19, 1998

A Pakistan Nuclear Test Will Put South Asia at High Risk Plans to Match India on Nuclear Capability Will Shatter Region's 'Nuclear Ambiguity.'
As the world awaits Pakistan's reply to last week's underground nuclear tests by India, a dangerous new era of instability is dawning on South Asia, one of the most volatile regions in the world.With India crossing the nuclear threshold and Pakistan...
Chinese Cash to US Politicians Monitor Confirms Gift to Democratic Fund-Raiser from Chinese Aerospace Executive
A state-owned Chinese aerospace company acknowledges that a senior executive gave about $300,000 to Democratic Party fund-raiser Johnny Chung in 1996.But the China Aerospace Corp. denies the funds from Liu Chaoying, the daughter of the then-highest ranking...
Cinema Verite: Better Than CIA
One Iranian film is worth a thousand intelligence reports. Or, to put it in Middle Eastern terms, two Iranian film festivals are a better bargain than the CIA and State Department.For years now we've been instructed, on the basis of secret information,...
Controversy Can Work - When Well-Managed
Which books belong in the hands of students? Classics of undisputed literary value? Books of a known moral quantity? Provocative works that will promote lively discussion? Feelings about what's appropriate vary so widely in the United States that the...
Engineering Schools Struggle for Diversity
They took a nation to the moon, invented TV, and soon America's still very white, very male community of engineers will add Cynthia Toscano to their ranks.A smile dances across Ms. Toscano's face as she considers this - and the hurdles she leapt along...
Fed Offices Gird against Hackers Hearings Start in Congress Today on How to Keep Computer Wizzes Away from Airport Towers, Pork-Belly Prices, and More
What if hackers broke into the Social Security Administration's computers and scrambled the names and addresses of those receiving benefits? What if antinuclear protesters - or worse, a hostile nation - breached Energy Department computers and discovered...
Forget French - Latin, Klingon, and Esperanto Are All the Rage
To sign up for Italian classes because you're planning a trip to Florence, or immerse yourself in Japanese in preparation for a pilgrimage to Nara seems perfectly reasonable. But to pore over Latin books or master ancient Greek? To work at speaking Esperanto,...
How to Teach Immigration? Try a Hands-On Approach
In early January, my academic team launched its interdisciplinary study of immigration. The culminating event is a field trip to the Ellis Island Museum and Statue of Liberty. But first, we held a simulated event to let students "live" the immigration...
Letters the Hot Potato of Organic Food Guidelines
Your story "Public Groundswell Sways Organic Guidelines" (May 14) fails to note that the organic foods movement offers absolutely no credible scientific evidence supporting its anti-biosolids stance. ("Biosolids" is the proper term for treated municipal...
Monitor Quiz: Gauge Your Global Grasp
The finals of the nationwide Geography Bee begin today in Washington, D.C. Fifty-seven students from a field of some 5 million participants (4th- through 8th-graders) will compete for a $25,000 scholarship. Public TV stations will air the proceedings...
Nukes 'Not the Way'
President Clinton used an apt phrase in talking about India's explosion of nuclear devices and Pakistan's threat to do the same: "It is a nutty way to go," he said at the Group of Eight meeting in Birmingham, England, over the weekend. "It is not the...
On the Trail of Crime on Campus
Although crime is not a problem on the small, suburban campus of Drew University, in Madison, N.J., I decided to investigate what crimes we students are informed of and which ones are left out. In a journalist's mind, there's always a conspiracy. I was...
Prayer and Nuclear Testing Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
India's recent testing of nuclear weapons triggered an international reaction both swift and negative. Concerns include reigniting the arms race; destabilization in the region, particularly with Pakistan and China; renewed pursuit of nuclear capability...
Secretary Riley: Point Man on Education
Meet the only US secretary of Education to have both a building and a penguin named after him. The building, on the campus of Furman University in hometown Greenville, S.C., is the Richard W. Riley Computer Science and Mathematics Building; the Humboldt...
Silence Is Riskier Than Openness
Dear Mike McCurry,It was back in mid-January when you came to breakfast and promised that your "boss" would meet with reporters very soon and clear up the Monica Lewinsky incident. I suggested that the president meet with our Monitor group as he has...
Stations Can Omit Political Candidates in Free-Speech Test, the High Court Allows Public TV Stations to Pick and Choose Debaters
In a decision that may shape the future of political debating on television, the US Supreme Court says public TV stations can pick and choose the political candidates they allow on the air.Yesterday's ruling, the biggest free-speech case of the current...
Suharto, Military Close Ranks after Repelling Effort in Parliament to Oust Him on Monday, Suharto Plans Reform in Attempt to Curb Protests
The end of a dictatorship does not come easily.Yesterday Indonesia's student activists took their calls for President Suharto's ouster to the National Assembly - an institution filled with politicians selected or approved by this country's political...
Teachers Tackle 'Uncomfortable' Books Head On
It's not yet 8 a.m. and sleep still hangs heavily in the faces of many of the students in Elizabeth Everette's 11th-grade English class. But the early hour doesn't fully explain the somewhat tentative and subdued atmosphere in the classroom.The students...
US Bridles over a Horse's Gait
IN the heart of horse country here, roads meander through rumpled green hills, past brick manors and million-dollar stables. It's a serene setting, a place where neighbors have known each other for decades, if not generations.But a furor is building...
US Web-Surfer Keeps Tabs on the Kremlin
The cold war is over. Western spies are not as busy as they used to be here. But Kremlin-watching is as alive as ever - thanks to a freer flow of information since the Soviet Union crumbled seven years ago, and thanks to the Internet and David Johnson.Many...
When No One Sees Red
Whatever happened to red pens?Any middlesomething adult who recalls a demanding teacher will probably also remember the color red. Red circles around errors, red letters ("awk") in margins, red numbers at the top of tests. Comments were expected, anticipated,...
Women Build Rank as Marines Today, Female Recruits Face the Same Standards Men Do - but 20 Years Ago It Was a Different Story
When Sgt. Maj. Beverly Morgan enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1975, the physical demands on women were rigorous: hours of backbreaking exercise with a red-hot metal implement."We did a lot of ironing," recalls Major Morgan, "and taking care of our uniforms,...

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