The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 19, 1999

Amid the Mist, Mets and Braves Craft a Hardball Legend ; Game 6 of the Series Is Tonight, but Baseball Fans Are Still Buzzing
Every now and then, when baseball diehards talk about some of the game's greatest moments, someone leans back, puts his hands behind his head, and says, "I was there." Occasionally, it's actually true. And for me - as well as the thousands of other...
Bitterest Foe of Fund-Raising Overhaul Draws His Sword ; Sen. Mitch McConnell Promises a Filibuster - Again - to Put Down Latest
To his enemies, Sen. Mitch McConnell is the Darth Vader of campaign-finance overhaul - personifying the evil of politics awash in corrupting big money. Yet to supporters, he is a saber-wielding Jedi knight for free speech. For good or ill, the coolly...
Canada and US in Drug Debate ; A US Woman Seeks Political Asylum in Canada, Claiming Persecution in Marijuana Case
A US woman wanted in California for conspiring to sell marijuana is fighting extradition from Canada on the grounds that she is a political refugee - from the war on drugs. Her belief in the medicinal value of marijuana makes her in effect a member...
Combating Isolationism
When the cold war ended, the smoldering embers of American isolationism got new oxygen and burst into flame. They burn in the presidential campaigns of Pat Buchanan; in the opposition of House Democrats and labor unions to free-trade agreements; in...
Discos and Diplomas Lure China's Elite
As "Didi" dances with a Day-Glo lime drink in her right hand, her left hand hits a speed-dial number on a palm-sized, chrome-plated Nokia cell phone. She begins mapping out the coordinates in Chinese for her next stop in New York's ultratrendy Soho district....
Foreign Owners Cut to the Quick with Nissan Layoffs ; Japan's Second-Largest Automaker Will Cut 14 Percent of Its Worldwide
Globalization put in a Godzilla-like appearance in Japan yesterday, crushing factories and leaving thousands jobless. At least that's how it felt to some Nissan employees. Nissan Motor Company's new Brazilian boss unveiled a massive restructuring plan...
Gore Tallies 'Clinton Effect' ; after Early Missteps, the Gore Camp Carves out Ways the Vice President
Even though Vice President Al Gore appears to be holding his boss at arm's length, even though he's gone so far as to move his headquarters to Tennessee, President Clinton is nonetheless playing an active, if somewhat muted, role in the Gore presidential...
If These Are High Standards, We Don't Want Them
It was just a few years ago that Mary O'Brien became uncomfortably aware of certain changes in the public schools her five children attend in Upper Arlington, Ohio. "We had a great multiage program at the elementary school, but then they began separating...
Is College for Everyone?
Lurking behind the gleaming promise of every wide-eyed freshman is a dark fact of US higher education: Half of those who enroll at four-year colleges and universities will never graduate. That means about 600,000 students each year will not complete...
Just Saying No to Gambling
Citizens in Alabama and South Carolina have shown it's possible for states to resist gambling. At a time when legalized gaming has become a nearly irresistible revenue lure, such examples are needed.Alabamians voted last week to stay in the minority...
Last Resort for Troubled Schools: City Hall? ; Oakland, Calif., Is Latest City to Debate Giving Control of School
Oakland, Calif., a city where poor public schools drive families to move out of town, is the next in line to consider handing greater power to the mayor to fix them. But bypassing or diminishing the independent role of school boards is giving pause...
Letters
Who would run Jerusalem better? Regarding the Sept. 30 letter from Mohamed Khodr, entitled "Disney's exhibit on Jerusalem: a marketing pawn?": What sober student of history could take seriously the charge that "the only time of peace, harmony, and coexistence...
New Life for an Old River ; Once the Cradle of America's Industrial Revolution, the Blackstone
James Knott bought a boarded up mill here. He fixed the dam and reflooded the mill pond. The turn-of-the-century water turbine creates one-fourth of his electric power. He now employs 142 workers, who manufacture wire mesh that is shipped around the...
New Rules for the Nuclear Age ; Defeat of Test-Ban Treaty Signals That US Remains Tied to a Cold- War
As 2000 approaches, the world may be facing a growing threat from the most dangerous invention of the 1900s: nuclear weapons. The years following the fall of the Berlin Wall saw an easing of atomic tensions, as the superpower arms race evaporated and...
Russia's Risks in New Phase of Chechen War ; There Were Signs of a Political Split Sunday as Troops Readied for A
Political divisions are appearing in Moscow as the Russian military prepares to press beyond its self-declared "buffer zone" in the breakaway republic of Chechnya. Russian generals are talking tough after the apparent success of "Phase 1" of the operation...
Scholarships Lure Dropouts Back to Campus
How eager are colleges and universities to raise graduation rates? It depends. One school clearly going all out is the University of New Mexico, which sends out letters offering scholarships to former students who dropped out - if they will come back...
Slow Going on the Syria-Israel Peace Track ; Recent Diplomacy, Including a Jordan-Syria Meeting Sunday, May Spell
Just a few months ago, when Israelis elected a peace-talking prime minister, the Syria-Israel rift appeared to be coming together. Though still technically at war with each other, both sides engaged in unusually warm rhetoric and mutual praise. Hopes...
Tallying Clinton's Post-Impeachment Score
A president famed for making comebacks, for pulling victory out of the jaws of a crushing setback, has been making a valiant effort to recover from his impeachment. But there's no better evidence than his crushing setback on the Comprehensive Test Ban...
Tense Moment in Indonesia's Power Struggle ; Tomorrow an Electoral College Will Choose Indonesia's Next President
Wan Bebas Iriansyah came to the demonstration in jeans and his tie-dyed Mt. Bromo T-shirt, which depicts the most picturesque of Indonesia's many volcanoes. It was an evocative choice. Lots about Indonesia's political scene these days suggests hot steam...
'The War of the Worlds' on a Halloween Long Ago
"Someone's crawling. someone or ... something. I can see peering out of the black hole two luminous disks.... Something's wriggling out of the shadow like a gray snake. They look like tentacles to me.... I can hardly force myself to keep looking at it,...
Today's Story Line:
Who will steer Indonesia through its troubled waters and into an full-fledged democracy? At least three candidates are vying for the helm. But some Indonesians are threatening "revolution" if the "wrong" choice is made by parliament tomorrow A California...
Treasure-Trove at the National Archives
The National Archives may bring to mind fragile parchment documents: The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. But beyond housing the papers that laid the foundation of a new nation, the National Archives is a federal...
Unsteady Guatemalan Peace
It is a powerful symbol of the challenges facing Guatemala three years after the signing of a historic peace agreement that the leading candidate in next month's presidential elections has not just admitted that he killed - in what he calls self-defense...
Urban Parents Protest 'Unrealistic' Standards
The epicenter of many parental protests over the standards movement may be the suburbs, but that doesn't mean inner-city parents are content with the new programs many schools are instituting - and particularly not with the high-stakes tests that generally...
What's New
Parents of Columbine gunman to sue DENVER, COLO. -- An attorney representing the parents of Littleton, Colo., gunman Dylan Klebold served notice last Friday of their intent to sue Jefferson County authorities for negligence. Thomas and Susan Klebold...
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