The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 5, 1999

A 'Romeo and Juliet'-Themed 'Leprechauns'
Family entertainment doesn't have to be all fluff. Though NBC's The Magical Legend of the Leprechauns (Nov. 7, 9-11 p.m., and Nov. 8, 8-10 p.m.) might have been thin enough to shove under a door, given the subject matter, writer Peter Barnes invested...
A Tasty Trip Back to Prince Edward Island
Although my mother was Canadian-born, she lived in the United States as a citizen for 75 years. She became a Yankee automatically when she married my Maine-born father, Lucky Frank. I followed, and was fetched up under two distinct but overlapping influences....
A Tricky Balance: Cool and Emotion
Sports must be played with emotion to be of any compelling interest. When they are not, we get professional basketball in November or chess anytime. Everyone celebrates emotion as a key ingredient to athletic success. So if a little emotion is good,...
Audiences Get into the Act - Literally
Don't plan on dozing off at New York's interactive theater productions. You might just have to participate in one. Audiences are briefly taking center stage in more than a dozen Broadway and off-Broadway shows such as "Dame Edna: The Royal Tour," "Tony...
Australia Likely to Keep Waltzing with the Queen ; Polls Show That Tomorrow's Referendum on Whether Australia Shouldbecome a Republic Will Not Pass
On the eve of the vote deciding whether to make the Commonwealth of Australia a republic, Coralie Mulholland has made her choice. "There are too many unanswered questions" in the republic model on offer to voters, she says in a shopping mall in the...
A Year after Landing, Ventura Leaves Big Political Imprint ; from Personality Politics to a Solid Legislative Record, Minnesota'sgovernor Builds a Third Way to Govern
OK, so you probably already know that Minnesota's governor used to wear pink boas in public. You're perhaps aware he used to strut around a wrestling ring and throw atomic elbows for a living. And maybe you've heard about the now-famous Playboy magazine...
Brave New World of Reproductive Rights
At one point, they both wanted to be parents. After a number of unsuccessful treatments for infertility, the couple moved to Massachusetts, attracted by clinics that offered advanced procedures. Finally, through in vitro fertilization, they welcomed...
Bush Emerges from Cactus Garden
OK, it's time to start paying attention. After four months of false starts, straw polls, and pseudo debates, the contest for the presidency in 2000 is actually beginning to take shape. And the ride may end up more interesting than we thought. All the...
Dangerous Schools?
Once again in Cleveland, that all too familiar tremor of fear. Four young students are arrested. A friend of theirs says the boys laughed about the shooting fray at Columbine High and planned to emulate it at Cleveland's South High School. Maybe they...
Etc
DEJA VU ALL OVER AGAIN Since the return of democracy across Eastern Europe 10 years ago this month, many people have yearned for a return to the relative simplicity of life in the communist era. In the Czech Republic, at least, they're about to get...
Europe's New Jews
Ten years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the municipal authorities in the Czech town of Usti nad Labem are busy erecting another wall, this time, to segregate a Roma (Gypsy) neighborhood from a slavic neighborhood. Despite the objection of the Czech...
FBI Turns Watchful Eye to Doomsday Cults ; While Most Americans Welcome Y2K with a Sense of Renewal, Officialswarn Threats of Violence Are Real
In just 56 days, the year 2000 will be celebrated jubilantly around the world as no New Year ever has. But the coming turn of the calendar also is being watched closely for signs of violent behavior, including domestic terrorism. Some of this concern...
Glaciers in the Himalayas Melting at Rapid Rate ; Nations Debate Cuts in 'Greenhouse' Gases This Week, While Pace of Icemelt Increases
The 1,000-year-old Hemis Buddhist monastery in Ladakh is one of the world's oldest and most famous. Yet in August, amid rain, floods, mudslides, and spillover from the Indus River, three walls of the monastery in the north India mountains began to crumble....
Going to Extremes ; Climbing, Jumping, Plunging - High-Risk Sports, and the Lifestyles Theypromote, Aren't Just for Pro Daredevils Anymore
The man reaches tentatively for the rocky handhold just above his head, his left foot beginning to slip on a small outcropping. He's 60 feet straight up a climb called The Pinnacle, and he knows that the harness he wears, tethered to another man below,...
Milestones for Peace
In an era when military might is still often used to either split up a country (NATO in Yugoslavia, for instance) or force it to stay united (Russia in Chechnya), it's worth noting two peaceful but necessary land transfers taking place between sovereign...
More Than Random Acts ; Originally Printed as an Editorial in the Christian Science Sentinel
A couple of years ago, "Random Acts of Kindness" was a bestselling book in America. It's a collection of quotations and stories of real people, showing how the world can be made a little better, one small act of kindness at a time. The events that took...
Playbill's Bright Yellow Banner Finds Niche on Web Site
Playbill is as much a part of the live-theater experience as expensive beverages and last-minute dashes to seats. Many audience members keep the 8-1/2 by 5-1/4 inch programs as souvenirs, free alternatives to the T-shirts and other paraphernalia sold...
Pope's India Visit: Mixed Blessing for Christians ; Persecuted Minority Welcomes Support, but Some Hindus Call It a Hostileinvasion
Patrick and Andrew sit anxious and quiet, hair carefully brushed, in St. Paul's church lobby. Their grandparents, tribal villagers, became Roman Catholics years ago, and made sure their families were educated, learned the laws of India, and found good...
Public TV Confronts Two 'D' Words
Big Bird, Bert and Ernie, Oscar the Grouch, and the "Sesame Street" gang celebrate 30 years of making learning fun for kids Nov. 10. The groundbreaking and award-winning show - just as important to PBS as "ER" is to NBC - will get a round of well-deserved...
Refugees Flood Tiny Ingushetia ; Russian Troops Opened the Border between Chechnya and Ingushetiayesterday; Thousands of Refugees Crowded Through
Here in this wind-swept, mountainside camp, 5,000 refugees huddle in old, tattered army tents on dirt floors - most without beds or blankets. Artillery shells boom in the background. And Russian fighter planes dive overhead beginning their strafing runs...
Schools Get Tough as Threats Continue ; with Rash of Recent Threats at Schools, Officials Enact Zero- Tolerancepolicies. but Do They Go Too Far?
Two months into the school year educators across America are struggling with the implementation of get-tough safety rules meant to stop a string of tragic student shootings. Sifting real threats from false ones - while trying to keep classrooms bastions...
Seeing the Story Helps Writer Keep 'The X-Files' 'Out There'
You don't have to believe in UFOs or government conspiracies to write for "The X-Files." "We're all fairly agnostic on all those subjects...," says Vince Gilligan, co-executive producer and writer, in a recent phone interview from Los Angeles about...
Sleepless in Seattle: Why Trade Is Keeping People Up ; Labor Groups, Environmentalists, and Politicians Use the Coming Worldtrade Meeting to Raise Pet Concerns
Get ready for a food fight over trade. In a few weeks, delegates from 134 countries will arrive in Seattle to kick off a new round of trade negotiations, which President Clinton calls essential for a more prosperous, open, and equitable world. But...
Sports 101
On Sunday, more than 30,000 runners will lace up their running shoes to begin their 26.2 mile trek through the five boroughs in the 30th annual New York City Marathon. Two-time winner Tom Fleming says, "I think the New York City Marathon is the most...
The Importance of Having Fun
One of my favorite books of all time is entitled "How Tom Beat Captain Najork and his Hired Sportsmen," by Russell Hoban (Atheneum, 1974). It is about recess. Sort of. Tom lives with his spinster aunt, Ms. Fidget Wonkham-Strong, who disdains his propensity...
The Monitor Movie Guide
Red stars denote the reviews of Monitor movie critic David Sterritt unless otherwise noted. Ratings and comments by the Monitor panel ( blue stars) reflect the sometimes diverse views of at least three other moviegoers. Information on violence, drugs,...
The Scoop: 'Insider' Delivers Great Drama
New movies as different as "The Straight Story" and "Boys Don't Cry" are based on real-life occurrences, but none is more revealing than "The Insider," starring Al Pacino as a crusading "60 Minutes" journalist and Russell Crowe as a tobacco industry...
Thorny Job: How to Remove Heads of State ; US Has Tried to Have Leaders from Castro to Qaddafi Ousted. Now Itturns to Milosevic
It's something with which the US has constantly struggled: trying to speed up a dictator's removal from office. In the 1960s, it was Fidel Castro of Cuba. In the '80s, it was Libya's Col. Muammar Qaddafi. In the '90s, it was Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein....
Today's Story Line
Pope John Paul II's visit to India today was meant to bolster the Christian minority. But right-wing Hindus, with little official opposition, are using it as a occasion to whip up anti-Christian sentiments. No bombs, but no food either. Conditions in...
'Train of Life' Stays on Track as Ironic Folk Tale Set amid War
A new French comedy called Train of Life tells the humor-filled tale of an unusual project: Jewish villagers attempt to save their community from the Holocaust by purchasing a railroad train, putting Nazi uniforms on their most military-looking menfolk,...
Update the First Amendment
I agree with your editorial "Reporters acting otherwise" (Oct. 27). The First Amendment does not protect journalists who use deceit to get a story. But more important than the case cited is the need to deal with the Constitution's First Amendment, ratified...
USA
The US will drop economic sanctions against Yugoslavia and back a massive aid program to rebuild the war-torn country if President Slobodan Milosevic permits free and fair elections, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said. She made the statement...
Where Power Should Lie
Nothing in the Bill of Rights says one right is less important than the others. The 10th Amendment, which reserves to the states and people those powers not delegated to the federal government, has the same weight as, say, the constitutional guarantees...
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.