The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 27, 2000

71 Years of Rule at Risk in Mexico ; at Tuesday's Presidential Debate, an Underdog Shows Up the Establishment Pick
One measure of just how conservative a country Mexico is: The same party has been in power for 71 years. That's longer than any regime in power anywhere in the world. One measure of how Mexico is changing: News organizations, and primarily the electronic...
A Tale of Two Successes
Kosovo and Chechnya will make the headlines for some time to come. Two neighboring "wars that didn't happen" make the case for preventive action. Macedonia, one of Yugoslavia's poorest republics, was the only one to gain independence without violent...
Behind Elian Debate, a Faded Fear of Communism ; in the Public Mind, Castro's Cuba - and Other Remnants of the 'Red Menace' - No Longer Pose a Serious Threat
It is dumbfounding to the Miami relatives of Elian Gonzalez: The majority of Americans say the boy is better off with his father in communist Cuba than with them in freedom-loving Miami. But the relatives appear to have overlooked a decade-long shift...
Civil Rights May Prove Pivotal for Fall Races ; Issues like Racial Profiling Are Energizing Black Voters, Who Are Crucial in Close Races
Add another issue to the list confronting voters this fall: civil rights. Everything from affirmative action to police stereotyping is galvanizing African-American voters - and could have a wide-ranging effect on contests from the presidential race...
Dressed to Kill ; Military Garb as an Expression of Culture
One way to answer the question "How has war changed us over the past 1,000 years?" is to look in our closets. "We have recruited so much of the modern wardrobe from the military in tailored valor, the pragmatism of warfare, and the memory of victory,...
Elian and the Pander Zone
Presidential campaigns are like extended - this year, very extended - David Mamet plays. It's never really clear what anyone's talking about. Politicians may discuss "issues," such as education or gun control, but often they're actually talking about...
Elian Is the True Winner, Not Cuba
Regarding your article "Big winner in Elian's case: Cuba" (April 24): I am somewhat disturbed by your paper's conclusion that Cuba was the main beneficiary in Elian's return to his father. First, your article could be read as implying that Castro's...
Here, Students Get Paid to See Wayne Newton
Beginning next fall, incoming freshmen at William Woods University here are going to have a whole lot more pizza money in their pockets. The question is: Will they have time to eat it, too? A pioneering program at this small Midwest college will offer...
How Alley-Oops and Layups Keep Kids Safe in Zimbabwe ; in a Nation Racked with AIDS and Economic Turmoil, Young People Are Flocking to Basketball Courts for a Little Relief
Terrance Chawanda got his first taste of basketball at 11 when his older brother fashioned a wire hoop and practiced jumping over him to slam-dunk a tennis ball. Years later, it was the images of Michael Jordan taking off like a bird from the free-throw...
How Societies March to War
Technology transforms society. Technology linked to warfare revolutionizes society. So it has proven out over the past millennium. Gunpowder is an excellent example. The development of gunpowder weapons in Europe and China during the first half of the...
Interview: Rabbi Irving Greenberg
Rabbi Irving Greenberg is the new chairman of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council, which oversees the holocaust museum in Washington DC. He spoke with the Monitor on the legacy of the World War II death camps and ongoing efforts to come to terms...
Iran's Young 'Rookie' Lawmakers ; Peaceful Protests across Iran Intensified Yesterday against Conservatives' Crackdown on Reforms
The euphoria of victory is wearing off for Iran's young reformers. Just one month away from taking their plush, red-trimmed seats as the new, boisterous majority in parliament, the gravity of their popular "coup" in February elections is settling in...
L.A. Tests Merits of Local Control of Schools ; in a Bold Move Watched by Educators Nationwide, the District Decentralizes Power to Boost Class Performance
Beset by overcrowding and stalled efforts to boost achievement in its schools, Los Angeles is taking a bold new tack: devolution. In a move being watched by education reformers from coast to coast, the nation's second-largest school district has adopted...
Life after Prison
Here's a little-noticed statistic that's worth chewing on. This year 585,000 people will be released from prisons in the United States, according to Justice Department figures. This is the flip side of the burgeoning prison-population coin. Locking...
Preventing War Means Peace Must Walk a Practical Road ; to Counter Deadly Conflict, the World Needs a Global Military Strategy as Useful as Deterrence Was during the Cold War
When World War I broke out, young men in Europe rushed to sign up. Crowds came out to send their boys off with flag-waving parades. The almost-festive air expressed the historical view of war as a normal and noble extension of statecraft. But the Great...
Redefining Our Brother-Sister Story
For Christmas 1979, my brother Philip gave me what I thought was absolutely the lamest gift a 17-year-old girl had ever received: a Webster's New World Dictionary. I figured he did it out of malice. We were both teens, and we were having trouble with...
Reflections on the Unthinkable ; the Unending Need for Healing
The 20th century may have coined the term "genocide," but it did not invent the notion that one group improves its lot by annihilating another. When 13th-century Mongol horsemen swept across Asia to the gates of Vienna, they made it a policy to kill...
Scientists Drafted in the Service of Mars ; A Hallmark of the Modern Era Is the Symbiotic Relationship between Science and the Military
If you don't think military technology can shape society, what are you doing on the Internet? This nobody-owns-it, many-use-it medium began as a way to build reliability into military communications. Or catch a TV weathercast. Rockets descended from...
Shaping Young Citizens
Citizenship used to be taught in civics classes in middle and high school. The instruction began even earlier, with the Pledge of Allegiance in grammar school and the recitation of patriotic dates, words, and heroes. By the end of 12th grade, presumably,...
Solomon Islands - Ethnic Conflict in Close Quarters
His name, he says, is John and he looks almost typecast for the guerrilla- commander part he claims. He is dreadlocked, dressed in fatigues, and carrying a battered .22 rifle painted with the words "No Peace." He also has a special weapon hanging in...
Stay Right Here ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Suicide is one of the 10 leading causes of death in the United States, and suicides among young people have increased dramatically in recent years. In the face of such statistics, the fact remains that a God of love and mercy is very much at hand to...
Today's Story Line
Seven decades and counting. The ruling party in Mexico has never lost a presidential election. But this time the race is extremely close. Iranians elected a bevy of young reformers to their parliament. But will they be able to cope with the current...
USA
In the latest in a series of habeas corpus decisions, the Supreme Court ruled that state-prison inmates don't necessarily abuse the judicial process if they again seek the help of federal courts after their original appeals are dismissed. Such dismissals...
US in Latin America: Good Deeds or Intervention?
The Clinton administration deserves applause for its recent actions to safeguard democracy in Peru and Ecuador. Washington demonstrated that it was both willing to defend democratic institutions and able to produce results. These US initiatives, however,...
Vermont Launches Revolution by Allowing Same-Sex Unions ; Supporters See the First-in-the-Nation Law as a Model for Other States, but Critics Decry a Decline of Moral Standards
Clutching his parents' wedding rings strung together on a silver chain, Stan Baker couldn't stop grinning in the wake of the Vermont legislature's historic decision this week to approve civil unions - the legal equivalent to marriage for same-sex couples....
Vietnam Revised: Toppling Myths about the War
It's among the most lasting images of the Vietnam War: the bedraggled and psychologically unstable veteran, racked by memories of the war and abjured by American society. Over the years, the portrait has been enshrined in print and picture, etched into...
War's Legacy and the Human Condition ; War Not Only Leaves Deep Traces on Cities and Landscapes, Its Rhetoric Seeps into Daily Life
A THOUSAND YEARS OF WAR AND SOCIETY, FROM THE CRUSADES TO THE A- BOMB, THE CULTURE OF WAR HAS SHAPED OUR HISTORY AND COLORED OUR LANGUAGE. TODAY, THE MONITOR LOOKS AT A THOUSAND YEARS OF HUMAN CONFLICT AND ITS LONG REACH INTO SOCIETY AND CONSCIOUSNESS....
World
The latest target of hard-line conservatives in Iran, President Mohamad Khatami's brother, was officially notified that his newspaper broke "the executive regulations of the press law." The Press Court warned Mohammed Reza Khatami that "necessary actions"...
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