The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 18, 1994

Abstinence
IN the ongoing debate about sex education, it's remarkable how much hostility is roused by the idea of promoting abstinence. Yet the lessons of abstinence, self-control, unselfishness, and respect for others must be learned at some time. Of...
Breyer Would Join Court's Swing Center
AFTER sailing through his Senate hearing last week with only minor buffeting, Stephen Breyer appears headed to swift confirmation for a seat on the United States Supreme Court. The Senate Judiciary Committee is likely to approve Judge Breyer's nomination...
Busy Work Leaves Students in School Daze
I was thrilled to see the opinion-page article "Class Time vs. Family Time: The Long and Short of It," June 21. Longer school hours are definitely not a solution to our country's educational and social problems. However, the author's reasoning overlooks...
Compromise Candidate Takes Helm of European Bureaucracy Luxembourg's Prime Minister, an Advocate of Free Trade, Satisfies Britain and France
BY tapping Luxembourg Prime Minister Jacques Santer to become the next head of the European Union's bureaucracy, European leaders selected a man who met all the crucial criteria, but who was no one's first choice.Government heads from the 12 EU member...
Computer Network Links Up A Disadvantaged Neighborhood
DORCHESTER'S Four Corners is a fragmented Boston neighborhood where gang violence often keeps people locked in their homes. Here, resident Alan Shaw is trying to mend the community through a computer-networking system.Over the past year, this computer...
Computer Pioneers and Educators Start Logging off Series: COVER STORY
AT the same time that millions of Americans are going on-line, some computer network pioneers are going off-line."To be quite blunt, I'm beginning to find stories about the Internet pretty boring," says Gary Chapman, a former member of the Computer Professionals...
Effectiveness of Mediation Programs Questioned
* Despite the proliferation of violence-prevention programs in schools, some researchers are expressing skepticism about their effectiveness.While the majority of programs have not been carefully evaluated, early evidence suggests that violence-prevention...
Freedom Summer of 1964: Interracial Success Story
THIRTY years ago Mississippi Freedom Summer began. Along with many others who had done civil rights work in Mississippi during the 1960s, I returned there last month for ceremonies marking the anniversary.It was a time for nostalgia. But it was not,...
Hooked On-Line: When Computer Users Prefer Cyberspace to Reality. Series: COVER STORY
PHIL NOAH, a computer-support technician at the University of Buffalo, tells the story himself."I guess I was addicted to it. Sometimes I would spend eight or nine hours talking to people on the computer. I spent a whole summer doing that once.""After...
If United Succeeds, Others May Follow the Airline Has Become a Case Study for Controversial Employee Ownership
ALTHOUGH most top executives expect at least some flak from shareholders and employees, they usually can rest assured that both parties will not open fire at once.Not so for Gerald Greenwald, the new chairman and chief executive at United Airlines in...
Italians Protest Government Decree on Justice System
ITALY appeared on the verge of a government crisis yesterday, little more than two months after Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi was sworn in.Interior Minister Roberto Maroni threatened to resign over the weekend over a government decree that changed...
Man to Man: Stop Domestic Violence Pointed Questions and Consistent Support Can Help
IF only the police had done more. If only the courts had taken stern action. If only the man had been sent to counseling. The O. J. Simpson case has sparked discussion about what can and should be done to stop domestic violence. But the most obvious...
McCaw Cellular Is the Prize AT&T Has Been Striving For
MCCAW Cellular Communications Inc., which has done more than any other company to put phones in Americans' cars and pockets, is a step closer to disappearing.The United States Justice Department gave its blessing Friday to AT&T Corporation's $12.6 billion...
Mediators Brace as Parties Vote on Bosnia Peace Map
BOSNIAN Serb leaders yesterday appeared set to defy the world's leading powers and reject the new peace plan for Bosnia-Herzegovina, raising the prospects for renewed carnage, a withdrawal of United Nations troops, and an end to international mediation."If...
Microsoft's Soft Reboot
THIS weekend's consent decree reached this weekend between Microsoft Corporation and the United States Justice Department constitutes a "soft reboot" for competition in the software industry.The government's hope: By curbing the software giant's "monopolistic"...
N. Carolina's Push for Info-Highway Raises Eyebrows
IN the race to link up to the information highway, North Carolina has taken an early lead among the states.If successful, the state's proposed high-tech network would go beyond the use of normal phone lines - which can take 2-1/2 hours to move a high-resolution...
On Health Care, Clinton Plays to the Middle Class
WHEN President Clinton addresses the nation's governors tomorrow in Boston, the final phase of an epic battle for national health-care reform will be under way.With the hour growing late, Mr. Clinton is making a bold gambit. Dismissing suggestions for...
Programs Target Student Violence Conflict-Resolution and Mediation Efforts Spread to Schools across the Country
MOST parents have tried to get their children to talk out differences instead of fight over them. It's a lesson that typically requires patience, time, and repetition, and it's one that schools are increasingly taking up as well, impelled by the growing...
Relief Agencies Struggle to Cope with Rwandan Exodus
A GIANT, underfunded rescue operation is gearing up to feed and shelter an estimated 500,000 to 1 million refugees who have fled in the past few days from Rwanda into Zaire, just ahead of rebel advances.The exodus is one of the largest and most rapid...
Removing US Export Shackles Will Increase Profits and Jobs
AMERICA'S high-technology exporters are caught in a time warp. Despite the end of the cold war and renewed emphasis on winning the international economic competition, Congress may be backing away from its plan to reform the export-control bureaucracy...
Rival Parents Clash over Adopted Child as in the `Baby Jessica' Case, an Illinois Dispute Focuses on the Legal Rights of Unwed Fathers
IN a suburban Chicago backyard, a 3-1/2-year-old boy known publicly only as "Baby Richard" frolicks around a sprinkler or bats at a baseball, unaware of the legal battle raging around him.But Baby Richard may have to leave the parents who have raised...
Senate Hampers Sale of Navy Ships to Eager Nations
IF everything had gone according to plan, the USS Saginaw would now be the HMAS Kanimbla and the USS Fairfax County would be the HMAS Manoora.Both would be sailing to Australia, which had agreed to buy the troop and tank transports (LSTs) from the US...
South Korea to Outline Policy on North Korea
TODAY South Korea will officially spell out its future policy on the Stalinist North after the death of President Kim Il Sung, government sources and news reports said yesterday. Prime Minister Lee Yung Dug was due to hold a Cabinet meeting today, and...
States Try Different Paths for School-to-Work Goal
IN accord with President Clinton's new School-to-Work Opportunities Act, states are busily tinkering with job training and education programs to prepare young Americans for the modern work place.The act, signed into law last May, authorizes $300 million...
Still `One Giant Leap'
A METEOR shower of television programs and newspaper and magazine articles has cascaded down on us this month as the world marks the 25th anniversary of the first humans setting foot on the moon.It's proper that we take time to recall and celebrate a...
THE DARK SIDE OF CYBERSPACE: Virtual Reality Now Harbors Actual Criminals and Addicts Who Shun the Real World
"I NEED help," writes a woman calling herself Fraggle Rocks."I'm an addict. I think I spend my whole life on IRC.... I even got married on there. See my ring?"She shows the "ring" on-screen - *O - followed by a computer smiley (turn the page clockwise...
The Majesty of Mountains
One of the least persuasive justifications for foolhardiness is surely that put forward to explain why people climb mountains. The north face of the Eiger, they say, is climbed "because it is there." Because it is there?As a timorous, level-ground, low-lying...
US Turns Blind Eye to Jordan's Breach of Sanctions on Iraq
EVEN as the Clinton administration nudges Jordan toward a peace pact with Israel, it is looking the other way as Jordan permits exports to Iraq that could help retool the warmaking capability of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein.According to United States...
Welfare Reform Becomes More Urgent in Many States
UNDER budget pressure, half the states in the country are now experimenting with ways to change a burgeoning "welfare culture." In general, the experiments are aimed at moving those on welfare from "stop and stay" to "up and out."The efforts are driven...
Where Did the Internet Start? Series: COVER STORY. Internet
Early 1960s</P><P> Computer scientists experiment with new ways of connecting</P><P> machines. 1969</P><P> The US government, through the Advanced Research Projects</P><P> Agency, decides to fund an...