The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 10, 2000

Actress No Stranger to Biblical Roles
For Jacqueline Bisset, riding a camel is all in a days work. Surrounded by thousands of extras, donkeys, goats, and sheep, Ms. Bisset and costar Martin Landau recently completed filming the biblical epic "In the Beginning..." in Morocco. The four-hour...
A Language of Sharing and Poetic Pictures ; as He Learns an Obscure Language of the South Pacific, the Author Learns about World Views
The Woleaian word for "starfish" is gattiuliyal, meaning "fingers of the sun." I learned this bit of poetry during my two years of Peace Corps service on Woleai Atoll. My first major task as a volunteer, along with learning enough about the culture...
A Little Respect for My Junk?
Like many city folks, I live on a street that seems to invite scavengers. The days before rubbish pick-up are always fruitful for those van-driving hunter-gatherers. In a given week, the curbside offerings might include a toaster oven, washing machine,...
A Musical Theater Legend Resurrects His 'Favorite' Flop
Composer Jerry Herman sits in the third row of UCLA's Freud Playhouse, his eyes bright as stage lights. He has fallen in love all over again. His "Mack and Mabel," about the star-crossed affair of two early film legends, Mack Sennett and Mabel Normand,...
As American as Salt Fish
An attentive reader kindly reassures us that a cow may be milked from her left side if we continue to do so, thus negating the age- old opinion that every cow should always be milked from the right. This seems to even out the bilateralism of the dairy...
Asian Films Gain Speed Using Surprise, Energy
Hollywood hasn't produced much excellence so far in the new century, but international movies have been taking up some of the slack. Asian cinema has enjoyed a particularly strong year, with Edward Yang's sensitive Taiwanese family drama "Yi Yi" and...
A Taboo Film No Longer Labeled 'Dangerous' in Indonesia ; Excited Festival Crowds Flocked to See 'The Year of Living Dangerously,' the Oscar-Winning Movie Banned as Subversive by the Suharto Regime
The crowd surged, desperate to get past the doors before it was too late. For a moment, the pushing, the clove-cigarette smoke, the shouting laughter were like a Jakarta bus terminal before the major Muslim holidays. But this group wasn't afraid of...
Audiences Should Dive in to 'Honor'
"Men of Honor" is an old-fashioned title for an old-fashioned movie that tells a true-blue tale - full of heroism, adversity, and human interest - through formulas Hollywood perfected decades ago. It holds few surprises, but it's just the ticket if...
Big Moons and Other Illusions ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Nearly everyone who has ever watched a scary movie - like a Hitchcock classic - knows how easy it is to be fooled. Even though you know it's fake, it's difficult not to get scared. Movie illusions, like dreams we have while sleeping, can seem awfully...
Coming Soon: Fewer R-Rated Trailers ; R Theater Owners Promise Not to Show R-Rated Previews at G- and PG- Rated Films
With popcorn and drink in hand, Delores and Sandy Gross plop into empty seats for the 5 o'clock showing of "Remember The Titans" (rated PG) at the local cineplex here. Lights down, curtain open, previews: First up, "Lucky Numbers" (R-rated), starring...
Dance Moves the Spirit
We really need to understand better how the arts speak to one another. A lot of contemporary art is made in response to other works of art, past and present - sometimes in mockery, sometimes in homage. Music influences architecture (architect Cab...
European Neighbors See Red over Nuclear Plant ; Austrian Protesters End Border Blockades Today after Agreement on Inspections
Until Thursday night, two dozen tractors parked higgledy- piggledy on the border crossing here symbolized the peak of a decade-long dispute between Austria and the Czech Republic. For two months, Austrian protesters blocked border crossings, demanding...
Fanfare for an Uncommon Man
A century after his birth, the composer Aaron Copland (1900- 1990) is idolized as the creator of such folksy classical hits as "Fanfare for the Common Man" and "Lincoln Portrait," and ballet music like "Rodeo," "Billy the Kid," and "Appalachian Spring."...
Letters
Al Gore has won a clear majority of the "popular" vote. If our democracy was constituted as it is most everywhere else, the Democrats and Greens would form a coalition representing a clear majority of all votes cast, with Mr. Gore as head of state....
Movie Guide
Ratings and comments by David Sterritt and Monitor staff. Staff comments reflect the sometimes diverse views of at least three other moviegoers. Information on violence, drugs, sex/nudity, and profanity is compiled by the Monitor panel. STAR RATINGS...
New Diaspora: Zimbabwe's Farmhands ; Land Invasions Are Forcing Workers off Commercial Farms, as Agricultural Woes Grow
In Zimbabwe's ongoing anarchic, frequently violent redistribution of land, the winners are often people with no farming experience. Meanwhile, up to 2 million farmhands and their dependents - 15 percent of the population - may soon be left homeless...
Now the Work Begins
Our quadrennial election should be a unifying experience. This one was far from that - not because of the closeness of the vote, but because of what exit polling revealed about a nation at peace, but not with itself; prosperous, but not really enjoying...
Olives and the Economics of an Intifadah ; R the Economic Risks - and Links - Shared by Two Mideast Societies Are Underscored with the Olive Harvest
For 55 years, an elfin, sun-wrinkled woman named Diyaa Shatara has come to these fields in early November, spreading blankets under the olive trees while the men in her family shake the fruit from their silvery green boughs. Olives fall, leaves are...
Parents Rebel against Explicit Student Surveys
It was question No. 70 that floored Tiffany Libardi. The mother of a sixth-grader, she first heard of the school survey from a fellow parent. All sixth-graders at Schaghticoke Middle School, it turns out, had filled out the survey in gym class Monday....
'Planet' Crashes onto Screens with Overblown Effects
Movie distributors give critics propaganda packets - whoops, I mean production information - to accompany their new releases, but these materials aren't always as effective as the studios hope. Take the information for "Red Planet" given out by Warner...
Prospects for Revote in Palm Beach
Despite the vote recount in Florida, apparent confusion over the ballots in one county has now become the focal point of uncertainty about the presidential election - and could lead to an unprecedented legal clash. The underlying question: Should...
Singer Gains Momentum with 'Righteous Love'
Most artists who have a monster-hit debut album face the specter of a sophomore slump, a follow-up that simply can't match lofty expectations set by that first release. Joan Osborne had a different problem: A record label that decided the follow-up...
South Africa's Morality Campaign ; Last Week, the Deputy President Told Parliament Many of the Nations Problems Are Due to a Decline in Ethics
Some call it desperation. Others see it as inspiration. But South Africa is pushing ahead with its latest initiative to combat soaring crime and corruption: a nationwide crusade to build up its citizenry's moral fiber. "Many of our socioeconomic...
South Korean Public's Support for US Bases Ebbs ; Last Week's Apology for a Chemical Spill Does Little to Reduce Friction between US Troops and Some S. Koreans
When Jun Sik-hyun was a little boy, he remembers seeing US soldiers arrive in his hometown and thinking that they were angels who had come to save him. "I thought they were from heaven, or from outer space," says Mr. Jun, now in his 50s, sitting...
Sports 101
Women's college basketball just got a whole lot tougher - and stronger. The juniors who dominated the game last year are back as seniors, and unlike the men who sometimes leave early to play pro, all of them have returned. There is a trio of talent...
The Fun Is Back in a Land of Dust, Oil, and Football
Time was, the Oklahoma Sooners were the scourge of college football, including an NCAA record 47 straight wins between 1953 and 1957. Three players won the Heisman Trophy, which goes to the best collegiate player each year. Six times between 1950...
The Results Are In
As the smoke of battle clears, it's time to draw a few lessons for voters and candidates from this week's nail-biting events: 1. Sock puppets are out. The sudden closure of pets.com - on election day - confirms Al Gore's decision not to use one of...
The Votes against Vouchers
Of all the results from ballot initiatives on Tuesday, two have national repercussions. In both Michigan and California, voters gave a big thumbs down to tuition vouchers for education. Opponents say a system of giving tax dollars to parents to pay...
Three New Plays Likely to Be Winners at Box Office
To wander through Times Square in search of a new theatrical attraction is to stroll back in time because the marquees still blaze with familiar titles. Midtown is such risky territory for theatrical investments that mostly it's the megahits of previous...
Trigger-Happy Election Calls
Election night was a case study in how media can make news, not just report it. Tuesday night's reports by radio and television networks that Florida's electoral votes went to Al Gore, then to "too close to call," then to George W. Bush, and back...
TV Serves Up Fine Family Fare ; Thoughtful 'Miracle Worker' and Funny 'Seventeen Again' Lead List of Good Choices
It's a rare TV week that offers a range of good family movies, and this is one of them. But most are bunched together on Sunday, so choose carefully. The Wonderful World of Disney presents a fine retelling of "The Miracle Worker" (ABC, Nov. 12, 7-9...
USA
In the recount of presidential ballots in Florida, Al Gore had cut George W. Bush's lead to 830 votes as the Monitor went to press. The recount, whose results won't be certified for more than a week, will determine which candidate wins the White House....
Voter Split Was Reaction to Clinton as Much as Issues ; in Exit Polls, Clinton Scandals Weighed on Many Voters, Heading off a Big Gore Victory
The president thought Americans had moved beyond it. The vice president thought he could distance himself from it. In the end, however, there was no escaping the Clinton scandal. It hung over the electorate like a thick fog that wouldn't lift. Of...
Where New Tobacco Shops Could Go Up in Smoke ; Shifting Focus from Points of Use to Points of Sale, San Francisco Considers a Ban on New Tobacco Retailers
They've been booted out of the workplace, restaurants, and bars. Now, smokers in San Francisco are facing new restrictions not only on where they can light up, but where they can buy tobacco in the first place. This city is weighing a new ordinance...
Will America Accept the Winner? ; R A Hyper-Close Election Result, Dogged by Dispute, Could Harm the President's Legitimacy
The most important question arising from the extraordinary presidential election of 2000 may not be who won, but whether the nation will accept that the eventual winner was fairly chosen. A president pursued by doubts about his legitimacy would be...
World
A leader of the military wing of Yasser Arafat's Fatah organization died in an Israeli missile attack as the Palestinian Authority chief was preparing to meet in Washington with President Clinton. Two women bystanders also were killed when the missile...
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