The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 15, 1998

After 20 Years, an 'F' the Department of Education Is Not Measuring Up
As parents face the start of another school year, they are preoccupied with thoughts of what their children need - pencils, paper, notebooks, haircuts, new clothes, and the like. Nowhere on most parents' lists of things their kids need to grow into educated...
Bringing Peace to Tajikistan's Mountain Fiefdoms Hopes Rise for Return of Vital UN Observers after Suspects Confess to July Killings
Only occasional gunshots break the eerie silence that envelops this capital at night. Residents abandon the tree-lined streets long before dark, and the few drivers to venture out race through red lights in the city center.Tajikistan's violent civil...
Colleges Ask: Can Enrollment Be Too High?
Across the United States, colleges and universities are facing a perplexing problem: More of the prospective students they admit each year are actually showing up.After a decade of vigorous marketing to boost sagging enrollments, many colleges and universities...
Creativity Replaces Racial Quotas at Colleges Minority Enrollment Leapt to 31 Percent This Year at One California University
When college students return next week to the University of California campus here in suburban Riverside, they will find something in greater abundance than on most campuses in America: minority faces.The number of underrepresented minorities has fallen...
Entering Golden Era of Giving New Rich
America is on the verge of a golden era of giving, an almost certain cascade of charity and philanthropy that will distinguish the start of the 21st century in ways comparable to the giant footprints left by the legendary givers of the early 1900s, Carnegie,...
Europe's Giant at a Juncture German Vote Sept. 27 Pits Kohl's 'Too Slow' Business Reforms vs. Schroder's Promises
If you're going to have a good new-business idea, try not to have it in Germany.That's the lesson Frank Rinn says he has learned from 10 years of struggling to bring his invention to market. And as he sizes up the main contenders in landmark parliamentary...
Fossil Hunters Leave No Rock Unturned
Portland Point Quarry is one of the few destinations in New York's Finger Lakes region where you won't need your watercolors. People do not come here to admire the blue waters of a lake, a dramatic gorge, or splendid autumn foliage. No, Portland Point...
From Now to 2000
Following the constantly rediscovered idea that honesty is the best policy, let us be frank about America and its leader:* Neither the US nor the world can afford to wallow in indecision and recrimination for the remaining two years of the presidential...
How Mexico's Poor Buy 20-Inch Sonys Credit Crunch or Not, Chain Stores Spread Far and Wide by Selling Appliances the Way Old Peddlers Did - for a Pittance per Week
Young Alfredo Flores and his wife recently had a new baby, so their modest income of 450 pesos (about $50) a week left no room for movies, concerts, or dinners out.But the couple still thought they deserved some entertainment in their life. So last December...
In Campaigns, Integrity Counts Clinton Scandal Has Pushed Moral Conduct to Top of Agenda in Congressional Races, Buoying GOP Hopes of Gains
Spurred by the scandal surrounding President Clinton, character and moral conduct are emerging as central issues in this fall's campaign to a degree seldom seen in American politics.Often in midterm elections, a candidate's integrity rests in the background...
In Jefferson's Words
The Founding Fathers have a way of stepping into contemporary political debates. Among the latest to do so is the globally admired Thomas Jefferson, whose words on "the wall of separation between church and state" were recently given a new, unproven...
In Many Tongues, Alaskans Debate English as Official Language Ballot Measure to Require Government Use of English Stirs Concern That Native Languages Could Be Harmed
At KNBA, Anchorage's native-owned radio station, programmers spice their alternative-rock menu with gentle linguistics lessons. Greeted with the Yup'ik "cangacit?" (how are you?), listeners learn to respond, "assirtua" (fine).Audience members - many...
Letters
Sports Commentary, Monitor StyleWhile I have only a very small passing interest in sports, I've been reading sports columnist Douglas Looney since July. I appreciate his opinionated observations and presentation of the subject, which I feel puts sports...
Lots of Students, Not Enough Teachers
A pop quiz for the start of the new school year: Take the highest number of students that ever attended United States schools (52.7 million). Add the lowest unemployment rate in 27 years. Factor in new laws mandating reduced class sizes.Question: Where...
One State, Two Different Texases Austin and El Paso Are Polar Opposites. Battle about a Pipeline May Deepen Divide
How big is Texas? It's a favorite question here, good for an hour of idle porch-talk at least, during which obvious answers - 267,000 square miles, 19.4 million people - are strictly forbidden.There are as many ways of measuring the size of the Lone...
Russia Sets Rampart against Islam in Case It Runs Rampant
Abdulhamid Gurukov is happy to be back home, even if it means living just six miles from the Afghan border. Six years ago the cotton farmer and his extended family of 17 fled Tajikistan's civil war, crossing the Pyanj River to Afghanistan with a tractor...
School's '60S Experiment Still Making the Grade
Back in the rebellious 1960s, a program with the unglamorous title of "Flexible Scheduling" was started at Seaholm High School in Birmingham, Mich.It aspired to three basic goals: individualized instruction, self- direction, and the professionalization...
Spiffier School: Nice Idea, but Who Pays?
In their first day back to school, the 1,300 students at William H. Maxwell Vocational High School may have felt a bit like the fictional Alice walking through the looking glass. The sturdy brick facade of their school - built for the elementary grades...
The Clintons' Party Problems
The Democrats' little secret is that the president's continued popularity, despite scandal, has papered over a wide schism among the party faithful. That, in large part, is what's behind those recently convened strategy sessions in the White House, led...
The Legends of the Sea
What has two tentacles, eight arms, a beak, and eyes as big as hubcaps?Answer: a giant squid, the sea creature of legend and reality.Regular-sized squid are fairly common. They range in size from less than a foot to nearly 40 feet long. They're easily...
Town vs. Gown: Students and Local Learn to Get Along
Ask any student in England and they'll tell you that Manchester University is a hot choice for high school graduates. It's not just a seat of learning, it's a city on the cutting edge, ever expanding, and leaving its smoky industrial roots in the dust.Call...
'Trying Out' for School
In that brief lull last week between the time Mark McGwire broke the record and Kenneth Starr released his report, there was some time to explore important stories a little closer to home, like the first day of school.Take the high-energy opening of...
US Chickens Steal Jobs from - Haiti? When Americans Say 'No' to Dark Meat, Cheap Drumsticks Flood Other Lands
Bernard Mayard sells frozen chicken drumsticks. His small corner store is all that is left of a once thriving chicken farm forced into bankruptcy by those same drumsticks.The problem is that the United States is flooding Haiti - and lands as far away...
US Public Chooses Stability, for Now Polls Show Public Is Dismayed by Clinton, but May See Greater Danger in Ousting Him
All across the nation, average Americans are expressing disgust and disdain for what many now see as morally degrading acts on the part of their elected leader.But they continue to separate the person from the politics. In the wake of independent counsel...
When Traditions Oppose Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Beside the Interstate to Nashville, a statue of Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest was unveiled on July 11. It has stirred controversy. General Forrest was hero to some, archvillain to others. A fierce Confederate soldier, he embodied courage and leadership....

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