The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 19, 2002

Amid Reforms, Muslims Still under Fire in Fergana Valley ; Critics Say That Uzbek Government Policies Are Pushing Even Moderates toward Radicalism
First came the kidnapping: Muhamadkhon Najmiddinov was walking home after prayers at a local mosque in Uzbekistan a few months ago, when men jumped out of a passing car, pulled a sack over his head, and bundled him off. Second came the frame: The same...
A New Museum for Lipstick Guns, Exploding Trees
Creating a museum to honor spies can be a tricky business. First off, it's difficult to create a "Hall of Fame" honoring the biggest stars because unlike, say, baseball players, the whole point of being a skillful spy is to remain unknown. There are...
Bush's Approval Rating Shows Unexpected Resiliency ; despite a Weak Stock Market and Corporate Scandals, President's Popularity Is Solid
Surprisingly, the slumping stock market and wave of corporate scandals have so far not taken a major toll on President Bush's approval ratings. Even though the president has recently endured some of the toughest weeks of his administration - facing questions...
Catholic Reformers Hold Historic Meeting ; Saturday's Boston Convention Is Being Watched by Lay People of All Stripes
Pope John Paul II spoke on the sexual abuse scandal in the church last spring in Rome. The US bishops spoke in Dallas in June. This weekend in Boston, several thousand lay Catholics bent on unprecedented reform will gather at a national convention to...
Cellphones May Be Key to Cleaner Air in Philippines ; in Manila, a High-Tech Campaign Is Launched to Stop Polluting Vehicles
The country that used mobile texting to overthrow a corrupt president is now relying on the same tactic to combat a different kind of enemy - air pollution. A nongovernment group called Environmental Watchdog (Bantay Kalikasan or BK in Tagalog) has launched...
Ecuador Oil Brings Hope, Concern ; A $1.1 Billion Oil Pipeline Will Double the Country's Production, but Critics Say Costs Outweigh Benefits
Hugo Troya was a farmer with seven acres in the foothills of the Andes. A year ago, a consortium of transnational oil companies demanded the use of his land to build a way station for the new trans-Ecuadorean Heavy Crude Pipeline (OCP) and offered him...
Green from the Get-Go
In April, the so-goes-the-nation state of Maine passed a law that was a breakthrough in green thinking: It told American carmakers they are responsible for cleaning up a toxic pollutant in their product - even though that product had changed hands many...
High Wire for Top Cop on Wall St. ; Critics Question Whether Harvey Pitt Can Police an Industry He Once Represented
Back when the Securities and Exchange Commission was created - amid a wave of Wall Street scandals - people figured President Franklin Roosevelt had picked a fox to guard the henhouse when he appointed Joseph Kennedy as the first SEC chairman. Joe Kennedy,...
His Hopes Were as High as an Elephant's Eye
Max didn't weigh much more than a bushel of sweet corn himself the first summer he began noticing hand-painted signs propped against pickup trucks parked at busy street corners. It wasn't the taste of fresh corn that whetted his appetite - though he...
How Returning Deficits Impact Main Street ; the Estimated $165 Billion Shortfall Could Affect Mortgages and Social Security
Largely obscured by the slumping stock market and corporate crime wave, something is going on in Washington that could push up your mortgage payment, make a job harder to find, and make Social Security's problems tougher to solve. For the past four years,...
IFC Turns Homes into Art Houses
More and more these days, television is proving to be a kind of savior to the small motion picture with the eccentric viewpoint. Zone in on The Independent Film Channel (IFC) and you reap most of the benefits of a film festival. The IFC features pictures...
In 'Stuart' Surprises Drop from Sky
America's unlikeliest new action hero isn't a 20-something arachnid, but a five-inch mouse with a heart as big as Central Park.As voiced by the incomparable Michael J. Fox, Stuart - now the "middle Little" in a family of five - is struggling with fitting...
'K-19' Is a Worthy Story of Heroism and Self-Sacrifice
A movie about a real-life nuclear accident aboard a Soviet submarine 40 years ago wouldn't seem to be the premise for a summer blockbuster - even if you throw in the estimable talents of Harrison Ford and Liam Neeson. But because "K-19: The Widowmaker"...
Listen to the Allies on Mideast
As Israeli-Palestinian violence flares anew, the Bush administration finds that few in the world community, and none of its important allies, support its Middle East policies. Still, these policies could be rectified by listening to some thoughtful friends...
London Stages as Testing Grounds ; City's Theater Has Worldwide Clout
Shakespeare as a pajama party. Shakespeare as a slaughterhouse. Add Vincent van Gogh in a British boarding house, a drawing-room feminist in the 1920s, and a baseball team taking showers onstage. Why sample theater in London for people who aren't necessarily...
Looking at the US through Many Lenses
You won't find wide-open landscapes a la Ansel Adams or Babe Ruth swinging over home plate on the walls at three American photo shows in New York this summer. Instead, you'll discover three distinct takes on American culture. The images of New York City...
Looking to Congress to Clean Business's House
It is not like the old days, when Americans looked to an activist president to wield power against business abuses and lead the country out of a financial morass. Vividly remembered in history are Teddy Roosevelt, the trust- busting scourge of monopolies...
Move over Ozzy. Here Comes Anna
Poet T.S. Eliot may have written about the end of the world, but if the pundits have it right this time, fellow Brit Ozzy Osbourne is actually helping it along. The hard rocker has spawned a hit show, and now his MTV reality sitcom, "The Osbournes" has...
Movie Guide
NEW RELEASES All About Lily Chou-Chou (Not rated) Director: Shunji Iwai. With Hayato Ichihara, Shugo Oshinari, Yu Aoi, Ayumi Ito. (146 min.) Sterritt **** Lily Chou-Chou is a pop star we hardly see, and the main characters are Japanese adolescents who...
Now I've Doubled My Garden Acreage
Marty and Marthy Macomber labored diligently to scrape together enough money to send their boy, Milton, to college, and it warn't easy. The old farm was nigh milked dry, so to speak, and each dollar was harder to find than the last one. But off the boy...
Reviving Recycling
Some 140 million Americans have the recycling habit. They dutifully put out their bins each week, or take their cans, bottles, and stacks of paper to a recycling center. But while participation rates are good, reducing the mountains of waste isn't easy....
Science Labs, Too, 'Cooking the Books' ; Fraud Charges against Several Prominent Scientists Have Sparked Inquiries and New Ethics Rules
For more than 75 years, Bell Labs has been a scientific Camelot. Its scientists and engineers invented the transistor and the laser. They were the first to hear the faint echoes from the Big Bang. In all, work at the Murray Hill, N.J., facility has earned...
Stage Struck ; Barbara Horrigan Joined a Community Theater in 1933. She's Never Left
The stage was set. It was the night of the final dress rehearsal of Arthur Miller's play "The Price." Actors and crew members at Arlington Friends of Drama, one of America's oldest community theaters, scrambled to put on costumes, rehearse their lines,...
Submarine Movies Keep Box Offices Afloat
One of Hollywood's better tricks is getting audiences to return to submarine movies again and again, even though by now we all know what happens when a sub dives too deep (think crumpled soda can). Put a macho leading man and a periscope together in...
Video Films Offer Fresh Views of World ; Directors at New York's Video Festival Blur the Line between Moviemaking and Video Art
It's a blockbuster world. Wherever you turn, the most heavily touted and readily available items are Hollywood pictures still riding the waves of their theatrical ad campaigns. Video stores stock dozens of copies of mainstream hits; independent films...
Western Female Aid Workers Targets of Rogue Violence ; after a French Aid Worker Was Raped in June - the Fourth in 10 Months - Some Western Women Consider Leaving Afghanistan
Patricia Omidian looked up through her glasses. Her palm-sized diary was open to an entry on June 8 - the day that a French aid worker was gang-raped by seven men in Pul-i-khumiri, a small town in northern Afghanistan. "It's just starting to sink in,"...
Why Change Is Stalled in Mideast ; Officials from Egypt, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia Visited the White House Yesterday, but Diplomacy Is Stymied
America's three closest Arab allies sent their foreign ministers to Washington Thursday hoping against hope to find a diplomatic path out of the Palestinian-Israeli cycle of violence. What they want is a bridge across the chasm between the American and...
Women's Pro Basketball Wins Fans All Its Own
A few not-so-scientific observations about the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA): * Women pros hustle more than men, even in an All-Star game. * Teenage girls are among the loudest fans in sports. * Sue Bird and Lauren Jackson, who both...
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.