The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 5, 2000

A Big Wallet Makes, May Break, a Contender ; Jon Corzine Will Spend a Record $35 Million in a New Jersey US Senate Primary
Jon Corzine is testing the limits of the adage, "you get what you pay for." The multimillionaire is all over New Jersey's airwaves, dispensing cash like an ATM with no withdrawal limits. There he is with 30-second spots on the "Today Show." Switch to...
A Cabinet That Refuses to Be Shelved ; the Longest-Serving Cabinet in the 20th Century Keeps Pushing Clinton's Agenda
They may not have Bill Clinton's rhetorical flair or killer political instincts, but like their boss, the president's Cabinet secretaries seem determined to throw off the lame-duck label. Having survived myriad scandals and investigations, this group...
'Are You Better Off.?' Perception, Reality, and Politics
Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore should keep an eye on the stock market. A crash could wipe out his chances for election. It would damage both voters' perceptions of prosperity and, in short order, their spending patterns. That's what two...
Beyond Talking Tough on Terrorism
This time last year, hundreds of Pakistani Army regulars and trained militants were discovered entrenched deep inside the high mountain peaks of the Kargil area in India's state of Jammu and Kashmir. The three-month, high-intensity conflict that ensued...
Bid to Ban Pesticides on Lawns Takes Root
It's definitely that time of year again: With the coming of spring, legions of landscapers have resumed their chemical crusade against dandelions and other uninvited guests at the great suburban lawn party. But that's changing in Canada. Concern about...
China's Leadership Still Silent on Tiananmen ; Eleven Years on, Activists Hold out Hope for Bringing the Perpetrators to Justice
As a reddish-orange dusk descended on Beijing on June 3, Ding Zilin began lighting memorial candles scattered throughout her tiny apartment on the western outskirts of the city. Reenacting a ritual she has performed each year for the past decade, Professor...
Clinton's Green Agenda Goes under the Sea ; after Focusing on Protecting the American Landscape, President Puts New Emphasis on Safeguarding Marine Life
Salty surf at his back, the nation's future before him, President Clinton went to the tiny Atlantic island of Assateague to announce a major initiative to protect the ocean. While Mr. Clinton has recently spent much time and effort safeguarding the...
Coming Soon: Web-Surfing by Cellphone
Bjrn Nordhammer has seen the future: In it, he is using a mobile video-phone to e-mail personal films to his family while he's away on a business trip. Martin Bouygues has seen the future, too, and he's afraid he can't afford it. Mr. Nordhammer is...
Expert: 'Don't Push Children on Careers'
What do you want to be when you grow up?" It's a question more parents seem to be asking their children earlier and earlier. Who can blame them, given the high cost of college - and the ever- changing demands of today's workplace? As a result, some...
Global Arms Race Turns Defensive ; Russia-US Talks over Missile Shield Indicate How World's Focus Is No Longer on Attack
In a debate that could affect the future of global security, a movement is growing to rethink some of the most basic principles guiding US arms control. For nearly half a century, nonproliferation efforts have focused on bilateral arms reductions and...
In-Flight Journal - Day 32
Ready for the twilight zone? Something happened today that made what's left of my hair stand up. Arthur saw a single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza approaching the airport. "Wouldn't it be funny if that airplane was from southern Africa, too?" he wondered....
Last Strains of the US Housing Crescendo ; Fewer Bidding Wars and Slower Sales Indicate Rationality Is Returning to the Housing Market
This leafy suburb, also known as the heart of Silicon Valley, has been on the nose cone of the nation's real-estate rocket the past couple of years. "For sale" signs seemed to come with "sold" already attached. Homes often fetched 20 or 30 offers, the...
Loving ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
While I was sitting down and reading in a small bookstore, a woman sauntered in. After watching her pick up a book and a few cassettes, I noticed her hands fumbling inside her sweatjacket. She had stolen the book and tapes. What to do? Turn her in?...
Making Hay from Fed's Interest-Rate Hikes
Cash is definitely king now, thanks to belt-tightening by policymakers at the US Federal Reserve. The Fed has pushed up short-term interest rates six times since June 1999. During that period, rates on money-market accounts have shot up 1 percent or...
Nader's Challenge to Gore
Your June 1 article is right that Ralph Nader represents a significant threat to Al Gore's ability to carry key Western states such as California and Washington ("Nader's rise puts Gore on guard"). Not only does Mr. Nader have the potential to appeal...
Reuniting Palestinian Loved Ones ; Israel Ceded Southern Lebanon Two Weeks Ago; Palestinians Are Rushing to Glimpse Their Homeland
Uum Mustapha, an elderly woman with a white kerchief framing her sun-baked face, gingerly stretches out her hand through the looping barbed-wire border fence that separates Lebanon from Israel to touch the sister she hasn't seen in 52 years. "How many...
Seeking Justice for Pan Am 103
The trial of two Libyan intelligence agents for the bombing of Pan Am 103 is barely a month old, and already much criticism has been leveled at the proceedings and the United States government's decisions that made it possible. The actual process of...
Setting Up a Foundation Can Be a Costly Move
Q Until recently, I almost never gave to charity. Now, with a soon-to-be new wife, and a church that I attend regularly, we're set up for a large amount of contributions. My thought was to create a small "charitable foundation" with a gift of some appreciated...
Some Long-Distance Deals You Wanted to Brag About
On May 8 we surveyed some long-distance telephone services and offered tips for matching personal calling habits to plans. We also invited you to let us know what works for you. Some results: I read with interest your article on long-distance service....
Stars Wars Trek ; Election-Year Politics Could Complicate the Mission
It's unlikely many Americans will base their votes this November on whether a political candidate supports a limited antimissile defense system. That question is just too complex, contentious, and off the charts for most people. And yet the issue is...
The Big Picture Is Lots of Small Ones ; Cloud-Hopping from Africa to Alaska
A 12,000-mile trip across three continents and 15 countries promises a broad view: grand vistas, the big picture, scope. But as we close in on our goal of Fairbanks, Alaska, it's the smaller picture that sticks in memory. Not the continents, not the...
The Day I Became a Principal Shepherd
Herding sheep - and I am not speaking figuratively, here - had never been part of my school-principal duties until 10:30 this morning, when Mrs. Hutchins called. She is married to Billy Hutchins, the road commissioner in a nearby town. Seven sheep, loosely...
Three Job Wishes? Try Again
For the graduating class of 2000, finding a job isn't the hard part. It's sifting through all the offers. Take Ryan Miller. The electrical engineering major at the University of Texas, Austin, had 10 job offers. (No that's not a typo.) In fact, she...
Today's Story Line
US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright once vowed she'd never return to the Middle East just to "tread water." Today she plunges back into the peace talks. Dr. Albright arrives two weeks after the Israeli turnover of southern Lebanon has changed the...
USA
At their summit in Moscow, President Clinton and his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, agreed to dispose of 34 tons each of weapons-grade plutonium, enough to build thousands of nuclear weapons. The pact will cost $6 billion and take 20 years to complete,...
What Not to Do at Your Next Job Interview
First impressions are important, and 44 percent of employers responding to a recent survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) say it's a job candidate's general demeanor that first gets their attention. But, sometimes,...
World
Shrugging off "right wing" threats of bodily harm, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak said history had shown that even assassination could not stop peacemaking efforts with Palestinians. Security around Barak and other government officials was tightened...
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.