The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 3, 2000

A Journey from Preposterous to Indispensable
So common and popular is the MBA degree today, it can be hard to grasp that most universities prior to 1910 scorned as undignified the whole idea of teaching business. Woodrow Wilson, who became president of Princeton University in 1902, gasped in...
America's Next Generation of National Parks ; New Proposals Reflect a Desire to Commemorate Less-Pristine Landscapes, as Well as Recognize Overlooked and Ignoble Moments of History
They are the modern offspring of an American idea born in the middle of the 19th century. They include a 200-mile strip of Iowa tall-grass prairie fronting the Missouri River, and the boyhood home of an African-American scholar who fought for civil...
Asia Hard Hit by Oil Price Hikes ; with Its Dependence on Fuel Imports and Subsidies, the Region's Economic Weaknesses Are Exposed
Mukesh the Delhi auto-rickshaw driver scrapes by as it is. Karina's family of fish sellers in Jakarta is paying a budget- straining 12 cents a gallon for gas. And now, an oil price rise. Developing nations, particularly in Asia, take the brunt...
Candidates Find the Old Rules Don't Apply
In the pantheon of presidential politics, tonight's debate between George W. Bush and Al Gore will be one of the most important in modern history. With polls showing the lead flip-flopping almost weekly, and with tens of millions of Americans expected...
Cities May Call out Dogs to Find Drugs ; High Court to Hear Arguments on Whether Random Narcotics Roadblocks Are Legal
You are in a car heading across town to an important meeting - late, as usual. On the highway ahead, you notice a flashing sign and a police officer waving all the cars off to the side of the road. An officer asks to see your license and registration...
Customizing the MBA Degree for Its Next 100 Years
Denise Andrus, an at-home mom, knows she'll be ready to get back into the workforce in a few years. So in the quiet wee hours of the morning, in bathrobe and slippers, Ms. Andrus is staring into the glow of her computer screen - working toward her...
Debates That Count
What to expect in the debates? The favorite: Al Gore. He's looked good in past performances, particularly against Ross Perot and Jack Kemp. He's an especially effective counter-puncher. The underdog: Gov. George W. Bush. He's never showed himself...
Do All Schools Need the Arts? Kentucky Says Yes
The arts have to prove themselves in education as few other subjects do. People may groan about math, but they take it. The same can't be said about drama, art, and music, long viewed as frills and often the first things to go when too many needs...
How to Create a Sovereign Kosovo
In the face of an election defeat last month, Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic appears all but ready to give way to his opposition successor. No matter what happens next in Belgrade, however, it is clear that the vote for the opposition was a...
Is the Track to Olympic Gold Medals Paved with Hard Cash? ; Now That the Sydney Games Are over, Canada Mourns Its Unexpectedly Low Medal Counts
For Canada, this Summer Games has been anything but an Indian summer: A poor harvest of three gold, three silver, eight bronze medals. And for the the past two weeks, as the occasional medal trickled in, the Canadian media has been trying to capture...
Literary 'Mews' ; a Gray Tabby Has Found a Home, and a Public Library Gets a Warm, Fuzzy Feeling
Emily is queen of her domain. She presides over the Mystic and Noank (Conn.) Library with a regal air, attended by library staff and visitors who have learned to do her bidding. Emily is not shy about telling them what she wants. For a cat, it doesn't...
On Anniversary, Germans Look to a Broader Unity ; Ten Hard Years after Reunificaiton, an Eastern City Pins Hopes on EU Expansion
Germans are marking the 10th anniversary of their country's reunification today with an official ceremony in the eastern city of Dresden and a large celebration in Berlin. Former chancellor Helmut Kohl, disgraced by a slush fund scandal, declined...
Peace That Left a Public Behind ; the Escalating Palestinian-Israeli Violence Highlights the Arabs' Resentments at Accepting US-Backed Compromises
After five days of the worst Arab-Israeli violence in half a decade, the underlying source of the Palestinians' frustration is coming into focus: the peace deal that Israelis and Americans have implored them to accept. The continuing unrest in the...
Shortage of State Judges Creates Logjams in Courtrooms
Colorado First District Judge Leland Anderson says he loves his job. It's the number of open cases he has to juggle - about 420 - that bothers him. "It's a great opportunity to see the complexities of life," Judge Anderson says of his work. "But having...
Show Me, Thank You, I Know ; Today's Article on Christian Science A Spiritual Look at Issues of Interest to Young People
There was a sign by a church. It said, "God Answers Knee Mail." That's because some people kneel when they pray. Get it? Sometimes they do this at bedtime. Some kids I know always say their prayers to the person who's tucking them in. There are good...
Study Finds Women Test Better in Math without Men
A recent report from Brown University shows that women perform as much as 12 percent better on math problems when tested in a setting without men. Researchers tested 164 male and female Brown students, who all had similar SAT math scores, in groups...
The Real Lessons of Back-to-School Night
To say that I live for back- to -school night would be a stretch. This autumn ritual usually creeps up on me unawares, with my kids casually mentioning amid a purposeful early-morning search for socks and backpacks that I should be at school at 7...
This Isn't Ally McBeal. It's the College Dorm. ; Thirty Years after a Co-Ed 'Revolution,' Togetherness Rules. but Its Broad Infusion into Campus Life Prompts Questions about Where to Draw the Line
Talk to college grads of 30 years ago, and men remember women being bused to campuses on weekends in order to see them. Professors chaperoned formal frat parties. Doors stood at least a foot ajar during dorm visiting hours and a residential guard...
Today's Story Line:
Palestinian frustration with the peace deal crafted by this set of leaders appears to be stoking the violence of recent days (page 1). The duration of this setback is unclear. Emotions are now pushing reason aside and this may mark the end of any progress...
Too Much Mixing? Parents Weigh In
When Raoul Felder's kids headed off to college, there was little discussion about where they would live. Co-ed dorms were out of the question. Period. His son, for instance, attended Columbia University and commuted from their New York home. "The...
What Is the Job of the School Board, Anyway? ; Work Holds Little Appeal for Many People, Even as New Studies Question Boards' Role in an Era of Reform
It's the job that gave Jimmy Carter his start in politics. It has alternately been described as "the most important volunteer job in this country" and "the toughest job in elected American government." It's the job of a school board member, and...
When Is It Really Correct to 'Beg the Question'?
A reader in Binghamton, N.Y., recently pointed out the misuse in the Monitor of the phrase "beg the question." The writer of the article, referring to efforts by US Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers to close elaborate tax shelters, says "his effort...
Why the Poll Booths of America Are Empty
Mark Mills cares passionately about community issues. He calls local officials and writes letters to the editor about everything from school spending to local tax rates. Yet he rarely votes. Currently, he's not even registered. "To me, politicians...

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