The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 23, 2001

A Gulf Opens around Colin Powell ; Strong on Reputation, the Moderate Leader Could Be Marginalized on a Team That Is Heavy with Conservatives
As a retired general, a war hero, and a public figure with enormous popularity, Colin Powell has all the makings of a forceful secretary of State. Yet as he takes office, Mr. Powell finds himself in the middle of a power struggle within President...
A New Plan to Legalize Illegal Workers from Mexico ; Five US Senators Are Working on a 'Guest Worker' Program. Bush Will Go to Mexico on Feb. 16
For decades, Mexicans have been going north illegally to pick tomatoes, wash dishes and clean houses. Now a group of US lawmakers says it's time to make it legal. With the number of Mexican illegal laborers now estimated to be between 3 and 7 million,...
A People-Power Precept
If Americans need one more lesson in how bad money can erode good democracy, they can take it from last week's "People Power II" revolt in the Philippines. A popular movement against corruption led to the ouster of President Joseph Estrada on Saturday,...
A Shy Son in Congo's Hot Seat ; after His Father's Funeral Today, Joseph Kabila Becomes the Official President
He doesn't smoke, doesn't drink, doesn't like going out to dinner, doesn't have a large wardrobe, doesn't have a lot of good friends, and doesn't speak the languages of the people he's going to govern. In fact, he doesn't say much at all. In so...
Bush's Religious-Right Challenge
Wags in Washington are telling a story these days: Two veteran GOP operatives are discussing the election, and one says, "I have good news and bad news." "Tell me the good news first," says the other. "The religious right stuck with Bush and helped...
Equity in Education ; Fix the Buildings. Buy Lots of Books. Install New Computers. Is That Enough?
Peter Thorpe's experiences in education have run the economic gamut. He once served as headmaster of a posh California prep school. Now he heads up Gateway High School, a publicly funded San Francisco charter school for at-risk young people. Having...
ER Confronts New Emergency: Too Many Patients ; Healthcare Experts Seek a Solution as Ambulances Are Turned Away at Overcrowded US Emergency Rooms
Dial 911 and you may discover the nation's economically ailing healthcare system is caught in an emergency of its own. Across the country, from Boston to Seattle, an increasing number of overcrowded, understaffed hospital emergency rooms are turning...
Extremely Cool Art
Every January, strange creatures appear in Breckenridge, Colo. You might spot a dragon, an elephant, or a pair of giant hands in a parking lot of the winter resort. Other strange but graceful objects also take form as teams from around the world compete...
From the Courtroom to the Classroom
Their orientation session last week began with upbeat images of smiling students and colorful bulletin boards. Slides clicked on and off the screen to the sound of the Jackson 5 singing that it's easy as "ABC." But nothing about the challenge these...
Harvard Draws a Line in the Cybersand
If the Internet pipeline gets fat enough fast enough, maybe community-college Prof. Douglas Rowlett will use it to vault into the stratosphere of faculty stardom alongside Harvard Law School Prof. Arthur Miller. As a well-known legal scholar, Dr....
How to Be a Hero? Find out, after School
"Future!" an energetic adult bellows into the bustling school cafeteria. A sea of schoolchildren quiets down a bit to respond: "Leaders!" The scene is perhaps a common one: A teacher tries to hush students, even instill a positive mantra in the...
Justice vs. Forgiveness: Fresh Battle in the Philippines ; like Other Former Leaders, Estrada Has Not Escaped Troubles Just by Leaving Office
Former leader Joseph Estrada left the presidential palace in a hurry: Half-emptied cabinets were left flung open, a machine to shuffle the tiles for mah-jongg, the game he liked to play late into the night, was left behind. Now begins the slower...
Kentucky Students Catch the Inaugural Spirit
To David Heyburn, the inauguration of George W. Bush was a moment he could witness with a certain empathy. The senior at Ballard High School in Louisville, Ky., won the top spot in his class election - but not on the first vote. That yielded a tie....
New Economy, Old Neighborhood
Ask Michael Duarte about the future, and his voice turns to resignation. For 14 years, he's been here on Pier One in East Boston. As vice president of Bay State Towing, he's dispatched tug boats and piloted oil tankers safely through the shoals of...
Quincy Lessons
When I read that the older George Bush was now referring to son George W. as "Quincy," I scurried to bone up a bit on the only other son of a president to attain that high office: John Quincy Adams - our sixth president, 1825-1829. George W., himself,...
Retirees Not Just after Fun in Sun
Jean and Erwin Anderson left the small farming town of Wahpeton, N.D., as a young couple. Their jobs took them to New York, San Francisco, Minneapolis. But when it came to retiring, they weren't lured by warm weather or previous adventures. They...
Test of Swiss Anticorruption Drive ; Prosecutors Want to Extradite a Former Yeltsin Aide Arrested Last Week in the US. Russia Objects
Tarnished by repeated disclosures that dictators and crime kingpins were storing ill-gotten gains in its banks, Switzerland has been working to restore its reputation. For more than a decade, this Alpine banking redoubt has taken steps - including...
Universities Prepare for Era of 'Star Professors' ; Reach of the Internet Encourages a Free-Agent Effect
Gary Hamel, one of today's hottest management gurus, was speaking to a crowd of top business-school officials via a large video screen. His message was not reassuring. Imagine, Mr. Hamel postulated, if a virtual university brought to one online...
Who Should Monitor the Smokestacks? ; Bush Team May Rely More on Self-Audits for Businesses in Areas like Environment
Gale Norton is just the beginning. Long after the debate over the Interior Secretary designee's nomination dies down, President Bush will be left to sort through the environmental issues that surround her. And one of the most controversial is likely...
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