The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 19, 2000

... and Supporters, Naysayers Need to Think Creatively ; Interview / Robert Reich
Robert Reich, former secretary of Labor in the Clinton administration from 1993 to 1997 and a university professor at Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass., has long enjoyed a reputation as a liberal Democrat. That's why Professor Reich surprised...
As Talks Restart in US, Terms Have Changed ; Representatives of Barak and Arafat Will Meet with US Envoy in Washington Today
After more than two months of violent confrontation, the Israelis and the Palestinians are on the verge of resuming full-scale peace negotiations. Teams from the two sides will meet separately with US officials in Washington today. In a conflict...
As Vouchers Are Struck Down in Cleveland, a Lawyer for the Plaintiffs Shares His Views
It's been one of the most contentious flashpoints in the national discussion over improving schools. And last week, the US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit waded into the voucher debate, finding that Cleveland's program to give scholarships for...
Bush's First Test: Selling a Tax Cut ; as in 1981, a GOP President-Elect Has a Big Tax Plan. but This Year Offers Difficulties
It's deja vu all over again: A Republican president-elect comes to Washington and insists that big tax reductions will be a priority just as soon as his Democratic predecessor leaves town. In 1980, such a tax-cut-first philosophy paid large political...
Bush's Inner Circle of Old Texas Hands ; His Cabinet May Consist of Washington Elite, but Closest Advisers Are from Home
As leaders of a diverse nation, most presidents promise a Cabinet with geographic, racial, and ideological diversity. And so far, President-elect George W. Bush's appointments do reflect a desire to have an administration that, as President Clinton...
College Football in the South: Don't Forget to Deck out the Dog
I didn't spend much time researching colleges. I opened one of those college review magazines and picked the first college I saw: Auburn University in Auburn, Ala. When I moved to Auburn, I felt like I had been slapped in the face by a huge, humid...
Design Is Key When It Comes to Vouchers. ; Interview / Paul Peterson
It's very clear where Paul Peterson stands on the question of allowing parents to apply their share of public-education funds to private-school tuition. "Over the course of 30 years, the amount of education funding in this country has increased by...
Edmond Pope's Cautionary Tale
While America was transfixed by its election debacle, a story with important implications for American-Russian relations unfolded in a dingy Moscow courtroom. The trial and subsequent conviction this month of Edmond Pope for espionage drew him 20...
El Dolar Wins Fans in Latin America ; from El Salvador to Some Mexico-US Border States, the Greenback Is Increasingly Accepted as Legal Tender
As Salvadorans bustle around the capital doing holiday shopping, many know this will be the last Christmas they will be paying with the colorful bills of the colon, their national currency. In a controversial move, the Salvadoran government made...
For Crowded Sidewalks, a 3 M.P.H. Fast Lane
Four strands of electric lights hang like rows of imitation pearls between the lampposts on Oxford Street, reflecting the parsimony for which the area's trade association has become famous. In the windows of Selfridges, the street's well-known department...
Give 'Em Some Some Credit
Carey Bosak and Keith Fallon grab clipboards and questionnaires - tools for their "service learning" class in community psychology at the University of Vermont, and hop into a car. Instead of going to a classroom, they'll spend this December day ...
Guided by the Stars - or God? ; A Spiritual Look at Issues of Interest to Young People
When I was in high school I used to buy magazines that had horoscopes at the very back. I remember turning to them almost immediately to find out how I would fare during the coming month. Would I have a happy or sad month? Good or bad month? Would...
Making the Roads Safe - for Elk, Bears, and Wolves
For years, the stretch of US Highway 93 between Missoula, Mont. and the Canadian border has had a nasty reputation. The notoriety stems as much from the number of wild animals killed on the road as from the alarming number of dangerous encounters...
Massive Moon of Jupiter May Hide an Ocean of Water ; New Research about an 'Ice Sandwich' on Ganymede Sheds Light on the Liquid's Role on Planet-Size Bodies
Data from the Galileo spacecraft have convinced scientists that Jupiter's largest moon probably has a global ocean. As big as Mercury, Ganymede joins sister Jovian moons Europa and Callisto as the largest water-covered bodies, after Earth, known...
Oil Pipeline Deal Poses Dilemma for Poland ; Russia's Proposal, Backed by West, Is Worth Billions; but It Means Forsaking Ally Ukraine
Wary after centuries of foreign domination, Poles tend to think twice when Russians offer a deal that sounds too good to turn down.The Russian gas behemoth Gazprom, working with West European partners, has proposed building a new energy pipeline that...
Savage 'Fun' with Body Slams and Barbed Wire
On Saturdays from 3 p.m. to sundown, the backyards of this working-class neighborhood echo with the sound of body slams. * Terry Adams, 16, who goes by the nickname "Twisted," launches a "Vader bomb" - a horizontal dive from the third ring rope, landing...
The Crises Are Imaginary, the Diplomacy Lessons Real
A quick glance around the world will teach aspiring diplomats that their career paths may well lead right to the center of a fast- breaking crisis. But put together events like civil war in Nigeria, the threat of nuclear attack from Muammar Qaddafi...
Today's Story Line:
Latin America is beginning to come to terms with dollar hegemony. If the arrival of McDonald's and Arnold Schwarzenegger movies weren't enough, now the American greenback is making inroads. On Jan. 1, El Salvador will become the latest laboratory...
UVM President Encourages 'Civic Engagement' ; Interview / Judith Ramaley
President Judith Ramaley knows she has some sales work to do with her own faculty if the University of Vermont is to fully embrace the notion that "civic engagement" and academics go together. When she first arrived at UVM and the term "service learning"...
Want to Promote Peace? Try a Little Chocolate. ; Marketing and War Games Are All Part of Graduate Students' Training in Modern-Day Diplomacy
Can cooperation and peace be achieved through marketing a dried- fruit product? That's the question a group of graduate students in diplomacy and international business recently took on. Mixing capitalism with altruism might not be a concern for...
What Bush Can Learn from Gerald Ford
President-elect George W. Bush must first rely mainly on words to pull a divided people together. Following a moving conciliatory speech by Vice President Al Gore, Bush had healing, unifying words like these: "I was not elected to serve one party,...
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