The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 31, 2001

A London Tradition: A Walk in the Park
A city is its people. And its buildings. It is traffic and shops and museums. But it is also parks. And since they are not exactly wild places, yet not precisely, or only, gardens, they are an urban phenomenon of rather a special kind, somewhere...
A Royal Treat in Surrey
One good thing about attending a flower show overseas is that you're less tempted to bring home a birdbath. Sadly, you also have to swear off buying any flowers -thanks to those pesky customs laws. Which leaves just looking. At the annual Hampton...
Bush Draws US Closer to Japan ; New White House Sees Japan as the Crux of US Security Arrangements in Northeast Asia
When the Bush administration gazes east, it sees a different view of the globe than its predecessors did. The new team largely sees the world in terms of threats posed to American interests - and one ripe with opportunities to minimize those threats...
Chile Continues Plodding Search for Truth ; Unlike Some Other South American Ex-Dictatorships, Chile Is Refusing to Sweep the Past under the Rug
Though a judge's decision Monday to formally try former dictator Augusto Pinochet for human rights abuses is far from final, the drawn-out legal proceedings and new efforts to discover what happened to those who disappeared during his regime are helping...
Clearing the Smog, Carefully
California is sticking to its goal of requiring the sale of zero- emissions vehicles (ZEVs). But with its ruling last week, the state's Air Resources Board has again whittled down that goal. Some other states, primed to follow California's example...
Endangered Weapons: Which Will Get the Ax? ; Slowing Economy, Desire for Missile Defense, May Lead to One or More Weapons Programs Being Scrapped
As President Bush tries to carry out his pledge to modernize the military, he may be left with no choice but to trim some of the biggest procurement programs in the history of defense spending. From the Air Force's F-22 super jet to the Army Destroyer,...
Happy New Year! Your 401k Is Tanking
My pension fund's year-end portfolio summary ended on a chirpy note: "All of us at _____ send best wishes for a healthy and happy New Year!" This uplifting message was undermined by the tables of figures revealing that, despite 12 months' worth of...
India Rises from Rubble with Old Social Divides ; Frustrated with Government Response, Indians Help Themselves in Relief Effort
In the historic center of Bhuj, 12 miles from the epicenter of Friday's earthquake, a dozen Muslim volunteers in rubber sandals are hard at work pulling out the body of a boy named Mustafa. Across town, Fenil Vora watches as workers prepare to cremate...
In Search of Recruits, Police Loosen Up a Bit
It was the final push in Boston's most expensive police recruiting effort ever. They had turned six beat officers into full- time recruiters. They put ads in 18 newspapers. They visited high schools and churches in their crisp blues, touting the...
Lingering in the Cool, Leafy Spots of Venice
As a gondola glides by, summer sunlight glints off the water and reflects from the bridges, buildings, and paving stones. Calculating the hour from the slant of the sun, you begin walking in the shadiest part of the piazza. Forget the shops on that...
McCain's Gambit: Sway Washington from Arkansas ; despite Agreeing to Put Campaign-Finance Reform off, He's Holding Town Meetings across US to Build Support
One week. That's all it took for John McCain and his signature crusade, campaign-finance reform, to reenter Washington's political dialogue. True, the Arizona senator backed off pushing the issue immediately in Congress, giving the Bush administration...
Philadelphia Rolls out the 'Green Carpet' ; the City Celebrates the World's Largest Indoor Flower Show
Watching people as they first enter a major flower show is always interesting. First their faces light up - and then their eyes begin to dart everywhere. Where to start? What to look at first? Then they do something amazing. They shut their eyes, and...
President vs. Governor over California's Power
Each gravitates to the political center, and each knows what it's like to run a big state. But when it comes to energy policy and the politics that drive it, President George W. Bush, a former governor of Texas, and Gray Davis, current governor...
Putin Pushes (Yet Another) Russian Constitution ; Critics Worry Amendments, Expected by Year's End, Would Foster Authoritarianism
The United States has used the same one for more than 200 years, with only rare adjustments. But in Russia, a fresh Constitution seems almost a rite of passage for each new Kremlin regime. Lenin prepared two successive Constitutions. Stalin wrote...
Quake Tragedies Can Be Avoided
We are witnesses to a new millennium but an old story: devastating earthquakes in both India and El Salvador. The toll is tragically familiar. In the Indian state of Gujarat, thousands of people are dead. In El Salvador, more than 700 are dead, ...
Rugby Rampage ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
If you think some of the biggest, brawniest US football players can get wild at times, wait till you meet a pack of 300-pound rugby players marauding through the early hours of the morning! When I knew these "chaps" best, rugby was still a truly amateur...
Sign of Times: Hair-Trigger Layoffs ; Pink Slips Are Proliferating, but They Are a Different Signal Than They Used to Be
The layoffs now rippling through the United States economy may exemplify a new aspect of work in the Information Age: Companies are quicker to pass out pink slips than they used to be. Why? For one thing, sophisticated data systems now allow managers...
Sudanese Hungry for an End to 17-Year Civil War ; as Fighting Intensified This Month, 30,000 Nubans Fled the Region Beset by Civil War since 1983
A young woman sings as she mills sorghum, the staple food of Sudanese living in the Nuba Mountains. She grinds a grapefruit-size rock against a stone table, pulling the dried grain under the stone and pushing aside the flour as it piles up. Looking...
The 'Grand Tour' of Europe: From Garden to Garden
"Il faut cultiver son jardin" ("One must tend to his garden"), wrote the French philosopher Voltaire. And Europe's plant lovers have been doing so ever since. The Council of Europe, in Strasbourg, France, has proposed a Garden Cultural Route to protect...
The Keys to Success Were at His Fingertips
The warning signs were there: yawning boredom with his Wallace's Farmer, an edgy disinterest in weed control and tillage depth, increasing irritability with all things agrarian. My husband, Dan, was in desperate need of a hobby. And while he may...
The Planet That Gets No Respect - for Now
Mark Sykes knows that Pluto is slipping away. Just 12 years ago, the errant chunk of ice and rock was as close to Earth as it ever gets - swooping inside even Neptune on its odd, elliptical path around the sun. The time was right, it seemed, for humans...
Want to Tiptoe through the Tulips? Head for Holland. ; with 7 Million Flowering Bulbs, Keukenhof Reigns Supreme in the Horticulture World
Ever since the first tulips arrived in the Netherlands in 1593, enchanting the nation and setting off "tulipmania," these colorful blooms have reigned supreme in this flat, fertile land. Today, nowhere is the love affair with genus Tulipa more dazzlingly...
We're Analog Citizens in a Digital World
To say I suffer from techno-aversion is putting the issue too strongly. In truth, I would love to understand all these digital gadgets with codes and options and inter-gadget hookup potential. I yearn to command them to perform all their magic tricks...
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