The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 20, 2001

Al Qaeda's Mule Trail to Pakistan
Upper Pachir is unlike most Afghan villages. Several of the males are plump, and the children look healthy - in contrast to the people just up the road, toward Jalalabad. Until about a week ago, many of the villagers in Upper Pachir say they were on...
Al Qaeda's Veil Begins to Lift ; since Sept. 11, Detectives Have Learned That the Terror Network Is More Organized Than Once Thought
Before Sept. 11, much was suspected, but little known about Al Qaeda. Investigations and recent arrests in Europe and the US, however, are now revealing a clearer portrait of Osama bin Laden's hydra-headed network of operatives and sympathizers. "We...
A Winter Walk Yields a Windfall of Gifts
The thermometer outside the house reads 4 degrees F. at 2 p.m. Skies are blue, the air is calm, and Rusty Point - a Chugach landmark visible from my yard - is bathed in golden light. A good day to be among the mountains, to visit Chugach State Park,...
Bumpy Rides and Rival Tribes on Afghanistan's Border ; despite US, Afghan, and Pakistani Efforts to Secure the Border, a Band of Foreign Journalists Finds Crossing Easy
If he is in Pakistan, as some suspect, Osama bin Laden should be safe from capture, as long as he stays off the main roads. That, at least, was the first thing that came to mind, when I and four other journalists - two Pakistanis, an Australian, and...
Business & Finance
Struggling electronics giant Motorola announced a deep new round of job cuts, adding another 9,400 employees to those already given layoff notices this year. Executives of the Schaumburg, Ill.-based semiconductor and cellphone maker also said they expect...
Christmas Trees and Our Christmas Ease
Fifteen years ago, my wife and I lived in a well-preserved pre- Civil War village on the Mississippi River. Life in this little college town was excruciatingly quaint. If we needed anything besides a sandwich or a watercolor landscape, we were in for...
Court Extends Print and Media Protections Online
In a court decision that was largely overlooked by the mainstream media, a New York Supreme Court judge has issued a ruling in a libel case that extends the same speech protections to online journalists that their print, radio, and TV colleagues have...
Did the Dutch Masters Cheat?
If this fascinating book does nothing else, it sharpens the way you look at paintings. But it does more than that. Its author, David Hockney, proposes a radical reappraisal of one crucial aspect of the history of Western painting: how many old masters...
Don't Let 'Right to Know' Be a War Casualty
Alexander Nikitin isn't getting hate mail anymore, but Gary Bass is. Russian courts bravely acquitted the former Soviet submarine captain of treasonous disclosure of state secrets last year. Mr. Nitikin had brought to public attention the risks created...
Ebenezer Scrooge Gets His Day in Court ; for 160 Years, We've Had the Poor Old Man All Wrong
History hasn't been miserly with Ebenezer Scrooge. Charles Dickens sold more than 6,000 copies of "A Christmas Carol" in the first few days after it was published in 1843. There have been countless editions, starting almost immediately with pirated versions...
Feeding the Spirit after Sept. 11: Learning to Love and to Listen
Rushed to press a month after the Sept. 11 tragedy, "From the Ashes: A Spiritual Response to the Attack on America" is a helpful spinoff from the leading multifaith website, Beliefnet.com. As the nation reeled from the impacts of the terrorist actions...
From the Streets of Marin to the Taliban
Along the picture-postcard streets of his former hometown, no one has an answer to the question that has vexed a nation: Why did John Walker Lindh take up arms with America's enemy? This is a place of vintage Jaguars and Volkswagen Beetles, where throngs...
Homeland and Hemisphere
Washington is closely reviewing how the military should participate in homeland security. Consequently, the current regional military structures are being reviewed for mission changes or even elimination. These unified commands - Southern Command, Joint...
Hooray for American History ; Kids Stories about the United States in Fact and Fiction
Although publishers could never have imagined the tragic events that spurred the patriotism sweeping America, they have conveniently packed a lot of US lore into their new releases. Picture Books What was it like to take part in the Boston Tea Party?...
In Response to Crisis, Online Religion Sites Take off ; Americans Seek Comfort in Virtual Spirituality and Interfaith Dialogue
More Americans than ever are "keeping the faith" in cyberspace. The popularity of online religion grew gradually over the past year, but then, amid a heightened sense of vulnerability in the aftermath of Sept. 11, Americans turned in droves to religion...
Letters
No parallel between Israel and US wars Your article "In search for militants, Israelis blow up houses" (Dec. 17) stated, "Asked about the shelling of the Akhras house, Raanan Gissin, a spokesman for Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, said: 'When the US went...
Love Means Never Having to Say: 'I've Already Got One'
With their 60th wedding anniversary approaching, my parents still make moon eyes at each other. They've been together since high school, and their love is so obvious it sometimes embarrasses their grandchildren. Mom massages my father's feet as they...
Monitor Breakfast: Senator Richard Lugar ; Selected Quotations from a Monitor Breakfast with Senator Richard Lugar (R- IN)
On need for President Bush to articulate next steps in war on terrorism: "I think he has to list the countries with regard to weapons of mass destruction. They are a fairly known quantity. There might be a surprise or two. I think we know who has been...
New Lesson
Little children find it difficult to conceive of parents not knowing where they are or what they are doing. If they play hide- and-seek, they want to be found, and laugh when discovered. Not able to imagine privacy, children feel little need for it....
Schools Now Integrate by Income ; Cambridge, Mass., Is the Latest City Trying to Counter a Rich-Poor Imbalance When Assigning Students to Schools
Nearly 50 years after the US Supreme Court ruled that "separate but equal" schools for blacks and whites were unconstitutional, a new legal and cultural climate is now causing many school districts to shift their focus to a different kind of segregation...
Security Trumps Privacy ; in the Name of Thwarting Terrorism, Americans Are More Accepting Than Ever of Technology That Tracks Their Every Move
Big Brother may be watching us, but since Sept. 11, most Americans are happy to have him around. Take Virginia Beach City Council member Rosemary Wilson. In July, she worried that a police department plan to scan beachgoers' faces with recognition cameras...
Serving Up A Farm Bill
Watching Congress hash out a farm bill doesn't inspire much confidence in the finished product. The lobbying, based on economic and regional interests, is fierce. Perhaps surprisingly fierce, when you consider that the current legislation, passed in...
Tears and Hugs as Parents and Kids Reunite in Congo ; Torn Apart by Years of Civil War, Families Find Each Other This Week with Red Cross Help
The moment that Aminatha Awazi sees her children for the first time in four years, she can't help herself. She lets out a sound that combines a yelp of joy and a moan of pain, leaps from her chair and fiercely embraces all three kids at once, tears streaming...
Terror War Hits Next Row of Hurdles ; Tension between Pakistan and India Presents Thorny Problems
The waning drone of B-52s over Afghanistan is signaling a new and in some ways trickier phase of the US war on international terrorism - at least on the diplomatic front. As complex as the campaign in Afghanistan has been, it was still in essence a battle...
The Bush Style: Flexible Conservatism ; after Starting out as an Ideologue, Bush Ends First Year as a Pragmatic Compromiser
The pattern is a familiar one for new presidents: Aim high on issues that speak to the party faithful, and then compromise when Congress balks. The first year of George W. Bush's tenure in the White House, by all accounts, fits that mold. His first moves...
Translating Belief in God into Health and Well-Being
The trend toward inclusion of some form of spiritual practice in healthcare appears to be accelerating - and maturing, from the speculative to the practical. This year, 72 medical schools - well over half of those in the United States - have offered...
USA
Suggesting that the worst of the US economic downturn is over, the New York-based Conference Board reported that its index of leading economic indicators rose a better-than-expected 0.5 percent last month, following a 0.1 percent increase in October....
War Creep
They were the hot wars in a cold war against communism: Korea, Congo, Vietnam, Cuba, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Angola, Grenada, even Afghanistan. Each was different. Each took a heavy toll. But each more or less helped to end the 45-year-long cold war....
Will Kids Go Looney without Saturday Toons?
Ever since the mid-1960s, Saturday morning has been the equivalent of Christmas for kids. It is one of the few times network programmers pay attention to the peanut-butter-and-jelly crowd - airing hours of cartoons featuring everything from crime-solving...
World
A "high-level" meeting between security officials of Israel and the Palestinian Authority - the first since Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's government cut ties with Yasser Arafat - was to be held as the Monitor went to press. Word of the talks came as...

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