The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 29, 2002

'A Call to the Right' - Redux
One look at my e-mail after the article "A call to the Right" appeared in this section last month, and you would know what I learned: It's impossible to write an article about ideology and please anyone.The story was about conservative organizations...
Adversity Bounced off This Rubber Genius ; Goodyear Inspired the Tire Company and Hundreds of Other Businesses, but He Won No Riches from His Great Invention
Here's a classic American business story and a refreshing antidote to recent revelations about self-seeking CEOs sneaking out back doors to cash in their stock options. Charles Slack offers the compelling story of American inventor Charles Goodyear (1800-1860),...
A Monitor Guide to Books of September 11 ; A Year after the Attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the Publishing Industry Has Produced More Than 300 Related Books. No Single Event Has Ever Generated So Many, So Quickly. in the Weeks Leading Up to the Anniversary, We're Providing Summaries of a Small Selection of These Titles. the First List Ran Aug. 22
110 STORIESIn the slew of Sept. 11 books being released this summer, "110 Stories" may be an anomaly. Composed of two- or three-page poems, short stories, and dramatic prose, it turns literary - rather than documentary - eyes on the terrorist attacks....
A 'People's Pageant' Takes Center Stage ; as a Civil War Rumbles on, Women Storm the Catwalk for the Annual "Miss Uganda" Contest
Rachael Kakungulu, descendant of the ancient tribe of Buganda, sucks in her tummy and teeters down the runway in her four-inch stilettos and black strapless dress, flashing her best Colgate smile.From the rear of the giant white tent, a thunderous cheer...
Apocalyptic - and atop the Bestseller Lists ; Author Tim LaHaye Takes on the Final Battle between Good and Evil
It seems an unlikely scenario - a retired preacher who has never written a novel being handed a $42 million book deal by Bantam for a new Christian fiction series. But then, Tim LaHaye is no ordinary fellow.He's come to fame and considerable fortune...
A Test for Global Business
Conventional wisdom has it that not much will be achieved at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg, which started on Monday.It will likely be loud and contentious, and critics are right to say that it probably won't end in any agreements...
By the Light of the Moon
Often when I think of the moon, Eric Carle comes to mind. The children's author wrote a book that, for a time in my household, came out every night as predictably as the Earth's satellite appears in the sky.I'm not certain what particular piece of "Papa,...
Changing the Name of the Game Field
There are many things you might call the home field of the Ravens, this city's National Football League franchise: Immense comes to mind, or gray and purple. Just don't call it PSINet Stadium. That was last year, before Internet company PSINet filed...
Christian Aid Worker Back in Kabul
Last year at this time, Georg Taubmann was sitting in a cell awaiting trial in a Taliban court for a crime he didn't commit: converting Afghan Muslims to Christianity.Before the Sept. 11 attacks, the trial of eight aid workers with Shelter Now International...
Doing the Kyoto
A recent report by the Bush administration admitted that global climate change is a serious threat. That's quite a step for a nation that contributes about a quarter of the world's greenhouse gas emissions.But reducing the amount of carbon dioxide that...
Fabricating the Future
Maggie Orth hunches over a sewing machine in her studio, carefully stitching a tiny piece of plaid cloth.But the new mother isn't making a baby outfit. Instead, she's creating an interactive wall hanging of fabric interlaced with electronics and special...
Finding Peace of Mind at a Hectic Pace ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
For many of us, peace of mind has become the No. 1 priority.I've worked for many years as a court reporter, employed by the county courts. I take verbatim testimony of all courtroom proceedings that I'm assigned to. Intense concentration is necessary...
For Late-Night Clerks, Boredom ... and Danger
Convenience store clerk Ams Sanyand has a dependable way to keep from getting robbed - or, worse, shot - as the clock leans toward 2 a.m.The trick, you see, is with the hands."They'll always send a guy in to see who's working and how he's handling the...
Hard as a Diamond, but Also a Gem
He blew into class that first day like a great thunder cloud, all blustery and menacing, his arms bulging with books, his wavy white hair streaming out behind him.Mr. Harris had come to our small public high school from a military prep school, an institution...
How Dangerous Is Iraq's Arsenal? ; the White House This Week Urged a Preemptive Attack on Iraq, but Experts Differ on the Threat Baghdad Poses
The smashed Iraqi laboratory may once have produced a million veterinary vaccines a year, as Saddam Hussein's regime claimed. But in 1998 this site outside Baghdad was ground zero in United Nations efforts to erase Iraq's biological weapons program.Armed...
I Play It Again - This Time with Feeling
The last time I had sat down at the piano, Richard Nixon was president.I'd stopped taking lessons a few years earlier, after I discovered dating. Lessons were torture. My teacher sported big floppy hats and wore garish makeup. She hummed loudly and out...
Japan: Think Big about Russia
Back in the days of the cold war, I visited a Russian-language school in Japan's northern island of Hokkaido. There, among college students and housewives interested in Russian literature or in tourist trips to the land of Tolstoy and Tchaikovsky, I...
Letters
Aussie immigration up for debateRegarding your Aug. 22 article, "Conservative Aussies shift approach to human rights": Australia has the right as an independent nation to decide who will be allowed to immigrate into Australia. Prime Minister Howard was...
Looking for a Heavenly Rendez-Vous? the Moon's Available 9/21
"Dad, the moon is coming home with us."Songwriter Greg Brown puts these words in the mouth of a young girl riding with her father in his pickup truck as a full moon rises over the Iowa plains. The song taps the celestial magic of a moon at the horizon's...
Major Battle Brewing over Leaks in Senate ; FBI Inquiry into Release of 9/11 Reports Raises a Question of Who Polices Congress
This is a city where leaking has become an art form. The stealthy release of a tidbit that can push an agenda, or sway or test public opinion is so common that it is rarely even scrutinized.But in post-9/11 America, that is changing. Leaks of information...
Mayor Seeks Reelection, but Isn't on the Ballot ; Washington, D.C., Chief Is Write-In for Sept. 10 Primary
Four years after this city celebrated the end of the mayoral reign of Marion Barry, legendary for being jailed for cocaine possession, the popular Mayor Anthony Williams is up for reelection. But thanks to his own campaign's mistakes, Mr. Williams won't...
No Fairy Tale: Researchers Spin Straw into Gold ; Grains Contain Gold in Forms That Seem Tailor-Made for Industrial Use
Rumpelstiltskin, the fairy-tale rogue who spun straw into gold, has nothing on Miguel Yacaman and Jorge Gardea-Torresdey.The two University of Texas researchers have developed a way to draw gold from wheat, alfalfa, or - best of all - oats.No spinning...
Reporters on the Job
* A THOROUGH JOB: When Scott Peterson saw firsthand the destruction of some of Iraq's suspected weapons sites in 1998, he was surprised at the meticulous work of the UN inspectors.Stepping into the dark interior of the General Establishment for Animal...
S. Africa Provides Model for Water Access ; Wednesday, the UN Summit Focused on Water and Sewage
Joyce Kumalo has turned her ramshackle tin house into a home. The bed is neatly made, and in the living area portraits of her grandchildren hang on the wall along with her daughter's diploma from a small business school.But a house, she maintains, is...
The Floods Are Beautiful, Wish You Were Here ; Determined to Find a Living Venice beneath the City's Dying, Museum- like Facade
"Not along the Grand Canal do you find the essential Venice," Max Beerbohm, the British novelist, once wrote. "The beauty that is hidden away, not the beauty that is revealed, is the city's essence."A longing to discover that essence firsthand is the...
Where Angels Fear to Tread - and Western Armies, Too ; It's Not Easy to Replace an Afghan Amir Who Has 51 Warrior Sons
Even before we reach the first anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, while US soldiers are still engaged in Afghanistan, we're already reading an enormous new novel about the West's efforts to change the leadership in...