The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 11, 2001

A Harder Look at Prescription-Drug Ads ; Critics Say the Commercials Prompt Consumers to Spend Too Much
Flip on the TV, and within a short time you'll likely see an upbeat ad for a supposed wonder drug. More often than not, it ends with a list of daunting risks. In the four years since the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allowed pharmaceutical companies...
A History That Japan Can't Forget ; Textbooks Become a Foreign Relations Flap as Asians Protest a New Take on WW II
The polite discomfort between Japan and South Korea over how to view Japan's World War II behavior is turning to anger over an unlikely battleground - Japan's new middle-school history texts. China has also registered its displeasure with Tokyo after...
Arms Race Behind China Impasse ; Taiwan Is All but Certain to Get Some US Arms. but Bush Must Weigh How High-Tech
Taiwan's military, though outdated, still bristles with power. It boasts 4,000 pieces of heavy armor, 593 combat aircraft, and a navy of four submarines, 16 destroyers, and 21 frigates. Yet all that may not be nearly enough. Just across the Formosa...
A Seasonal Yearning - One More Fresh Start
On the first balmy weekend after a long New England winter, suburbanites are reveling in the end of their hibernation. Walkers and joggers have returned to sidewalks and streets, savoring longer days and milder temperatures. Dogs, eager to run, strain...
A Trial for Guatemala's Military ; the Case of Five Accused in a Catholic Bishop's Murder Is Expected to Last at Least Three Months
Guatemalans are riveted to a high-profile murder trial here that is being seen as a landmark case for human rights. Security is tight as the third week unfolds in a trial of three military and two other defendants accused in the killing of Roman ...
Bush Can Help Macedonia
The Clinton administration had a two-word explanation for former Yugoslavia's woes: Slobodan Milosevic. Under this view, one man was so powerful that he alone transformed a peaceful, multiethnic federation of 25 million people into a land of strife....
Cleaning House, and Cleaning Up ; as Goods Accumulated by the Road Each Day, People Began Visiting These Piles to TAKE a Look
My alarm clock didn't wake me the other morning. Before it had a chance, I was roused by the steady clang-clang of aluminum tubing landing on a metal surface. I knew it was aluminum tubing because there was a cache of it outside my house that morning,...
Confused by Tableware? A Guide for the Clueless. ; an Elegant Hostess Shows How It's Done
Those of us who write about food often complain that no one ever asks us to dinner. I'm certain that acquaintances worry, "With all that writing about fabulous food, imagine what she'll think about my cooking." I wonder if my friend, Suzanne von...
Flora Biblia
The Bible abounds with plant imagery and references, from the fig leaf in the story of Adam and Eve (Gen. 3:7) to Jesus' parable of the tares and the wheat (Matt. 13:24-30). So it's natural that gardeners might consider creating a garden of plants...
Go Ahead, Watch TV - and Here's How
National TV Turnoff Week is at hand (April 23-29). For those who view television as that "monster in a box," a passive medium that turns our minds to mush, urging a week without television is akin to a declaration of war. If you go to the TV Turnoff...
Helping Teens Avoid Red Ink
Credit card debt is a fact of life for many Americans. Overdue payments are up, and bankruptcies are frequently tied to overused credit cards. The numbers are unsettling: The average American household now carries well over $7,000 in credit-card debt,...
Legacy of Scandal Mars Rhode Island ; Indictment of Providence Mayor Only Adds to State's Image of Being 'For Sale' and Puts Focus on Reform
The people of Rhode Island will tell you this is nothing new. The mayor of this capital city was indicted last week on 30 counts of corruption, and the indictment alleges he extorted cash and contributions for city contracts, for real estate deals,...
Ozemite and Antiglobalism Down Under
Dick Smith loves Vegemite. "I eat it every day for breakfast.... I'm just sticking my finger in it now.... Hmmmh!" But about 18 months ago, Mr. Smith discovered that the company that makes the Australian icon - a salty, yeast-derived spread popular...
Public Wary of Funding Faith-Based Social Services ; While Americans like the Idea, Support Weakens over Specifics, a Survey Finds
On the face of it, Americans like George W. Bush's proposal to give funding to religious groups that provide social services. But when they mull over specific details of the plan - which religions should qualify, which services should they provide...
Secretive Swiss and Icy Stones ; While Deals Worth Millions Are Sealed, Who Protects the Mountains of Diamonds?
Every few months, a nomadic tribe of jewelers and gem merchants gathers in a different city to flaunt their wares, meet their colleagues, and seal a few deals. They bring glittering piles of loose diamonds, chunky wreaths of South Sea pearls, and...
Some Kids Have 'Natural Talent,' Others Have to Work at It
"Jay and Jon are really good soccer players. They're the best on the team," my 7-year-old son said as we rehashed the Saturday- morning soccer games at dinner. I reminded him that these brothers are the sons of two former competitive soccer players...
Telling Photos Capture Life of a Rural Family ; A Photographer Spends 20 Years Documenting Four Generations
It started simply enough. Twenty-two years ago, during a visit to friends in Athens, Ga., photographer Vaughn Sills went in search of a new project. She wanted to use her camera as a "divining rod" to help her find a subject that would "call" to her....
The Buck Starts Here
He's neither a Reagan nor a Clinton. In fact, in his first federal budget plan, George W. Bush showed he can walk a finessing line between competing concepts of Washington's role in shaping America. The new president decided to ignore the old hard-line...
The Summer Mom Grew Five Lovers of Vegetables
When I was 10, we lived on Cedar Flats, just a right turn from the McKenzie Bridge on the way out of the Willamette Valley in Oregon. For me, the garden and the spring - our water supply - was where that summer centered. Mom's five children carried...
Uphill Battle: Building Serbia's Free Press
Revolutions, by definition, are supposed to change everything. And indeed, six months after Yugoslav strongman Slobodan Milosevic was ousted from power, some things are changing. The new democratic leadership is beginning to rebuild a civil society,...
When Easter Ham Comes Naturally
I never met a ham I didn't like. That is, after I became a pig farmer. It's an avocation I never aspired to, but which I now look back on with delight. For almost two years, I rented a tiny cabin on a fourth- generation family farm, where Belted...
Why It's So Difficult for the US to Offer a Full Apology
To many Americans watching from their living rooms, the US-China word war sounds disconcertingly like a sandbox spat between schoolchildren. "Apologize." "Won't do it." "Will too." "Won't." Yet behind a seemingly puerile clash driven by big power...