The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 16, 2001

A Belt and an Old Photo Bind Me to a Moment
While sorting through some old photographs recently, my attention was drawn to a tiny black-and-white snapshot. I had seen it before, of course, but it had been many years ago. It hadn't meant much to me then. Perhaps a half century or more needs...
A Restaurant in Your Fridge ; Shoppers Find an Expanding Menu of Prepared Foods That Shatter the Old TV- Dinner Mold
For many Americans, the term "frozen entree" conjures images of warped lasagna and crusty macaroni and cheese, not haute cuisine. But a walk down the chilly aisles of most grocery stores today begins to yield a different picture. With a few exceptions,...
As Economy Lags, Support for Bush Drops ; between February and April, President Bush's Public Support Dropped in Every Region of the Country, and among All Age Groups. Even Fellow Republicans Gave Him Lower Marks
President Bush's honeymoon with the public may be over. Factory layoffs are rising, the stock market is depressed, and a new nationwide survey finds that Americans are increasingly frustrated with Washington's response to economic problems. One result:...
A Spiritual Approach to Time Behind Bars
By 17, Micheal Nicastor was in prison for committing a number of robberies with a sawed-off shotgun. He escaped twice and in the second break killed a man during a robbery. That got him life. "I was the kind of guy who is everybody's nightmare," he...
Audits Drop, Fraud Concern Rises ; R the IRS Is Striving to Lighten Its Image and Be Nicer. but Some Say Tax Compliance Is Slipping as a Result
A few years ago, powerful members of Congress were painting the Internal Revenue Service as something akin to a terrorist organization, with taxpayers as the target. Stop, the legislators demanded of the agency's nearly 100,000 employees. Be nice...
A Window on Peru's ; Truth Commission Work on Peru's 'Disappeared' May Hinge on the Mid- May Presidential Runoff
For 18 years, Angelica Mendoza waited for word of her son Arquimedes, taken from her home in the Andean city of Ayacucho by hooded men and never heard from since. Now, though, Mrs. Mendoza thinks she may find out what happened to him. "So many people...
Battered Cincinnati Looks for Lessons
For Kimberly Thompson, the recent riots, the police shootings, and the decades of racial tension in her usually quiet Midwestern city all come down to one thing: "That could have been my son." As this mother of four talks about African-American teenager...
Before You Interview: Hiring Has Taboos, Too
Think job seekers are the only ones with sweaty palms? Interviews can be as tricky for employers as they are for prospective hires. Federal and state laws targeting discrimination limit interviewers to questions related to job functions. Although...
Best Budget in a Decade
President Bush's first budget is impressive, reasonable, and utterly unsurprising - in other words, exactly what you would expect from listening to the compassionate-conservative themes of his campaign. If he were the right-wing ideologue many critics...
Bonfire of the Humanities
The National Endowment for the Humanities is in danger of losing its mission as the premier - and essential - source of support for humanities research. Under pressure from Congress, the NEH's shrinking resources are going to more popular pursuits,...
Canadians Wrestle over Sharing Their Water ; for Canadians, the Thought of Exporting Their Crystalline Waters Verges on Heresy
When Ian MacLaren wants students to drink in the essence of being Canadian, the Canadian studies professor lines them up in sturdy canoes and sends them down an Alberta river. Before long, paddling along in silence, most of them understand. "Water...
CEOs as School Principals
Privately run public schools have spurred both innovation and controversy during the decade or so they've existed. With profit as a motive, managers of such schools can use market incentives to create new curricula and teaching methods. In many cases,...
Etc
I'VE FALLEN ON HARD TIMES As with other dotcom millionaires, the past several months haven't been kind to Jaakko Rytsola. As noted in this space last November, he paid the largest traffic fine in Finnish history - more than $70,000 - because penalties...
French Workers' Formula for Not Getting Fried ; Could a 1998 Plan for a 35-Hour Week Serve as a Model for US?
Five million Frenchmen - and women - couldn't be wrong. That's the view of some American workplace experts, now casting an eye across the Atlantic for confirmation that a shorter workweek - as mandated in 1998 by the Socialist-led government in Paris...
Funds That Grin When the Market Bears It
When it comes to mutual funds, a falling US stock market doesn't phase Dale Schmidt. Let 'em tumble, he says. Mr. Schmidt likes all companies in a down market - be they small- cap firms, giant S&P 500 companies, big guns of the tech-heavy Nasdaq 100...
Getting Real about Work and Time
Much has been made of President Bush's "short" workweek - a healthy 50 hours or so, by most accounts. We're meant to feel nostalgic, it seems, for the wired-for-speed work world of the 1990s. And to rue the return of grey suits - back from the 1950s...
How Best to Benefit from Child-Care Tax Breaks
Q I would like to know (since my wife and I disagree on this) whether having money deducted pre-tax for child-care expenses is any better than waiting until tax time and claiming all the expenses at once. Is it simply a matter of getting some money...
In Taiwan, Vague Still in Vogue ; How the US Arms the Island Will Lurk Behind US-China Talks on the Collision
A quip here goes: "Independence is something you can do but you can't say; unification is something you can say but you can't do." On this island of 23 million people, such ambiguity is the way Taiwan manages to "live with China" - the mainland government...
Not All Governors Get Mansions - nor Want Them ; Populist Massachusetts Never Built an Official Residence. but Now Its Governor Must Commute 2 1/2 Hours to Work
In many states, it's as powerful a symbol of political power as the capitol dome itself: the governor's mansion. The first house of Kentucky was fashioned after Marie Antoinette's chateau near Versailles. Hawaii's head of state lives in the home of...
Readers Write
Even some 'hawks' want military base closures Your April 12 article "Defense priority No. 1: military readiness," correctly illuminates the broad strategy and spending issues facing the Bush administration. However, not only "doves" recognize that...
Still High in a Slowdown, Executive Pay Draws Looks
Business has slowed. Layoffs mount. But executive pay continues to soar - at least so far. Business Week's annual survey finds that chief executive officers at 365 of the largest US companies got compensation last year averaging $13.1 million - up...
The More Things Don't Change. ; ... the More They Tend to Stay the Same - Including That Gunk on the Refrigerator Door You've Been Meaning to Address
Is there something in your life that you keep meaning to change, but never get around to doing it? Like replacing that curled-up linoleum in the kitchen, for instance, or covering that ugly water mark on the living-room ceiling? After years of experience...
USA
Authorities in Cincinnati were considering whether to lift a nighttime curfew that has been in place since Thursday, barring further signs of rioting and looting that has ravaged the city since the shooting of an unarmed black teen by police April...
Welcome to Maine. or Is This Still N.H.? ; R Colonial-Era Border Dispute between the Two States Lands before US Supreme Court
Most folks driving north on I-95 in New Hampshire are unaware of the exact moment they cross the border and enter Maine. Does it happen at the center of the bridge spanning the Piscataqua River, or later, as they pass over the waterway's north shoreline?...
What to Know about Layoffs and the Law ; Firms Have a Lot of Leeway When It Comes to Letting Workers Go. but They Sometimes Make Mistakes
Nobody likes to be shown the door by the boss. Sometimes it's unfair. Occasionally it's illegal. Layoffs go along with lean times. Firms commonly cast big workforce cuts as "downsizing" needed just to keep afloat. Announced job cuts reached an unprecedented...
World
The status of "revolutionary martyr" was conferred on the Chinese jet pilot who apparently was killed in the April 1 midair collision with a US Navy surveillance plane. The ceremony followed the abandoning of the search at sea for pilot Wang Wei....

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