The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 18, 2001

A Clash of Cultures in Egypt ; the Trial of 52 Alleged Homosexuals Pits Traditional Values against Calls for Secular Tolerance
Dozens of men stand shivering in a rusty black cage along a wall - the way defendants are usually held here during trial. Alleged homosexuals, most of the men cover their faces in white scarves, some fashioned into masks with slits for the eyes. ...
Across Southeast Asia, Ripple Effect of Attacks on US ; Several Nations Take Steps to Boost Security, While Appealing for US Restraint on Possible Military Action
The international dragnet is now turning up new evidence of Asian links to Osama bin Laden's Al Qaeda organization, underscoring the breadth of his operations. * A captured Philippine rebel leader on Monday named Mr. bin Laden as a financier of Abu...
A Czech Teacher Strives to Counter Discrimination
When Svetlana Krostanova first entered school five years ago in the Czech town of Ostrava, teachers and social workers said she was retarded. They sent her to a "special school" for the mentally disabled, where almost all the students were Roma (or...
A Friend by Any Other Name
This is my bad news/ good news friendship story. The bad news was that I somehow misplaced my dear friend Gail. The good news is: I found Isabelle. Gail and I became buddies because of my/her shirt. We met the September after the winter I inadvertently...
An Urgent Bid to Lift Economy ; Fed's Half-Point Cut in Interest Rates Monday Is Part of Rare Show of 'Economic Solidarity' in Wake of Terror Attack
The surprise interest-rate cut by the Federal Reserve Board yesterday is aimed at bolstering an economy that is now in grave danger of slipping into a recession. By making a half-point rate reduction before the market even opened - the first time...
College Students Turn to Vigils, Teach-Ins, CNN
To students at Boston University, services and vigils at the school's Marsh Chapel have been as natural a place as any to be this past week. Senior Susan Harrington says a lot of students who don't consider themselves religious have attended the events...
For Egypt, a Feeling of Vindication on Crackdowns ; as Arab States Consider Joining a US Coalition, They May Ask for Latitude
As US President Bush works to build an international coalition of nations willing to combat terrorism within their own borders, Egyptian leaders are warning that the US must permit Arab states to fight the scourge on their own terms. Their concerns...
From Taliban Clerics, Mixed Views on Terror
As a Muslim cleric and head of his own religious school in this dusty Afghan refugee camp, Maulvi Abdul Qudus has mixed emotions about the terrorist attacks on the United States last Tuesday. On one hand, he considers terrorism to be un-Islamic, since...
Memorial Doubles as Forum on Tragedy ; A Popular New York Park Overflows with Mourners and a Range of Opinions on Retaliation
Before last Tuesday, Union Square was known for its chic restaurants and weekend farmer's market, its small green park a popular haven for skateboarders and activists, students and families. Now, it has become the city's primary spot for mourning....
Muslims Deal with Grief - and Prejudice ; in Wake of Attacks, American Muslims Struggle to Defend Their Faith against Stereotypes
As Reda Ragoui knelt to pray last Friday, his mind was swirling with a host of conflicting emotions - gratitude, sadness, and a sense of fear. As he recited his prayers and pressed his forehead onto the soft carpet of an Upper East Side mosque in...
No Lapse in Liberties
A number of wise voices have cautioned that the terror attack unleashed on America must not become an excuse for suspending basic American principles and values. That warning has immediate application to the treatment of the country's millions of...
Pakistan on Edge over Its Choice to Be a Key US Ally
By offering the United States "every possible help" against terrorism, Pakistani President Gen. Pervez Musharraf has achieved what nearly two years of intense diplomacy and economic reform couldn't: turning Pakistan from a near pariah into one of...
Pilots and Passengers Fly Again, Gingerly ; Congress Considers a Bailout of Struggling Industry, as New Security Measures Begin
America's airlines are again taking to the skies - cautiously. But last Tuesday's terror has permanently altered flight conditions. And the most pressing question in the new climate remains: Is it safe now to fly? The answer affects everything from...
Science Education Gets Turned Upside Down ; Physics Comes First, as a Foundation for Biology
Last year, the San Diego school system got some bleak news about its science program. A review showed that only 32 percent of the district's 143,000 students were eligible for the University of California system - in part because most were taking...
Sermons Take on New Urgency as Clergy Wrestle for Truth
On this weekday night on the edge of autumn, the Rev. Walt Gerber's congregation has come by the scores and by the hundreds to listen. They fill each pew and spill out into the hallways, craning their heads around pillars and through open doors, each...
South Wrestles with Segregated Sororities ; at University of Alabama, Greek System Remains Divided along Racial Lines, despite Prodding by Faculty
Christina Houston never set out to break a race barrier at the University of Alabama. But recently, the curly-haired, mixed-race sophomore revealed that last year she had been accepted into one of the university's all-white sororities. "Growing...
Spies That Cross a Line
United States intelligence-gathering is undoubtedly some of the best in the world. While finger-pointing is not appropriate as the nation heals itself, questions as to how 13 intelligence agencies failed to detect the massive attack on Sept. 11 need...
Teaching beyond the Terror
School superintendent Dan Gaetz spent last Tuesday in a whirlwind: reaching out to children in his district's 39 schools, fielding calls from people wanting to help, wondering how soon parents on the nearby military bases in Okaloosa County, Fla.,...
The Tragedy of Arab-American Relations
Sadly, I'm not surprised that the evidence for the most devastating terrorist attack in history points to a Middle East connection. I have just returned from the area after almost two years there as a MacArthur fellow. I was conducting field research...
Two Days of Infamy - and the Chance to Lead
I was sitting on a cot in an Army barracks in New Jersey back on Dec. 7, 1941, when I learned via the radio about the Pearl Harbor sneak attack. It was a Sunday afternoon, and I was getting a little respite from training. That evening, I sat with...
US Calculates a War with Little Room for Error ; Risk of Spawning Terrorism, Weakening Moderates in Mideast
As President Bush rallies a war-ready American public with talk of winning a "crusade" against evil, quieter calculations are under way here over the tremendous risks to US security of waging an all- out war on terrorism. The risks - especially of...
Who's Scoring Those High-Stakes Tests? Poorly Trained Temps
Growing up in California's public schools, I took more standardized tests than I can remember: Teachers at every grade level stressed their importance. I didn't want to let anyone down, so I approached each test with all the solemnity and effort a...
You Say 'Potato,' and I Say 'Pomme De Terre'
Finally, I was back in Paris! My husband and I walked through the cobbled square to our hotel, gazing around delightedly. The place was full of tourists, but unmistakably Parisian. I looked forward to repolishing my rusty French. My last visit to France,...

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