The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 7, 2000

A Black School Welcomes Its First Black Principal ; Teaching with Flair: An Occasional Series of Profiles of Teachers Who Make the Grade with Students and Colleagues
A day in the life of Sister Roberta Fulton can include everything from giving eighth-graders a pep talk before a quiz to dancing "The Chicken" with her kindergartners. And after the students at Our Mother of Mercy Catholic School go home, she delves...
Better Courtship of Voters
As American voters unite today as a nation to elect their leaders, they can also begin to speak out about ways to improve the campaign system before the next election. More than in the past, this campaign was too long (well over a year) and too expensive...
Brazil Reexamines Birth Options ; Brazil Has One of the World's Highest Rates of Cesarean Sections, Seen as 'Chic' and 'Painless.'
When Angela Soares discovered six years ago that she was pregnant, she knew immediately what she wanted: a cesarean. Like women at the stiflingly hot maternity ward recently at Rio's run-down Gafree and Guinle Hospital, Ms. Soares had heard that cesareans...
Bringing 'Fuzzy Math' into Focus
Sometimes words take on sudden new meanings - and an almost instant currency. A case in point: fuzzy math. It's a term that will resonate long after today, when voters finally make the call about who will be America's 43rd president. In the first...
College Students Seek Solutions to Terrorism
Recent terrorist attacks in places like the Middle East and Yemen have sparked many students to ask: Why does terrorism occur, and what can I do to stop it? The University of Missouri-Columbia introduced a unique class this semester to help answer...
Education Debate: Moving beyond Politics
Both presidential candidates have said that too many public schools in America are failing. We agree. There is not only an educational, but a moral imperative to take immediate action. George W. Bush and Al Gore have proposed three broad remedies...
For Voters, High Court Is a Priority
Remember Willie Horton? In 1988, Vice President George Bush used the escape of Horton, a convicted murderer out on furlough in Massachusetts, to pound Democratic presidential nominee Michael Dukakis. Crime was hot in 1988, and the GOP used it to ride...
In EPA Case, Court Weighs Power of Agencies ; Supreme Court Probes Sharper Limits on Regulators in a Possibly Far- Reaching Case
Three years ago, the Environmental Protection Agency enacted tough air pollution standards to reduce the amount of soot and smog in the atmosphere. Instead of ushering in an era of cleaner air, it triggered an avalanche of legal challenges by industry...
'Lost Boys' of Sudan Find New Life in America
The word epic only begins to cover Nhial Fata Daniel's journey. When he was just five years old, he fled his home in southern Sudan after an attack by government forces. Over the next two years, he was forced to move twice, walking more than 600 miles...
Mystery Men
Big mysteries hang over us as we head toward the outcome of this tight election: First, why are many liberals sticking with Ralph Nader when they know they are contributing to the possible defeat of Al Gore? Second, is this confident, campaigning...
Party Time for Weary Candidates
Meyera Oberndorf thought she had just been elected to the Virginia legislature. At her campaign headquarters, there were hugs and kisses. The governor called to congratulate her. The only problem: There was still one precinct left to count - and that...
Pressuring Professors to Put in More Face Time
Decades ago, a tenured professor might stride through the halls evoking awe among undergraduates and a tinge of inspiration in junior faculty. How the mighty have fallen. Tenured professors aren't at the bottom of the public-opinion heap with used-car...
Rocks of Ages
In the past year you've certainly handled objects that are more than 1 million years old. No question. These items are so familiar you barely notice them. Yet they're easy to find. Just pick up a rock: It's one of earth's ancient treasures. Geologists...
Same Address, but Smaller Office ; Whoever Wins Today Succeeds to a Presidency Diminished - for Now - by Globalism, Prosperity, and Low Expectations of the Governed
Al Gore appeared with pop piano player Bruce Hornsby at a rally in Dearborn, Mich., this weekend. Unaccountably, the vice president kept referring to the musician as "Rogers Hornsby" - a Hall of Fame second baseman who last played in 1937. George...
S. Korea's Enthusiasm Fizzles for Cozying Up to North ; Weeks after Winning the Nobel Prize, President Has Chorus of Naysayers at Home
The world summoned a round of applause for South Korean President Kim Dae Jung last month in the form of the Nobel Peace Prize, a bow to his efforts in human rights and in reconciliation with Seoul's onetime enemy - North Korea. But in many circles...
Small Bookstores Write Themselves a Happier Ending
When Bob Contant and Terry McCoy opened their East Village bookstore 23 years ago, lexicons had yet to define phrases like superstore or dot-com. A lot has changed since then. Today, the bright green facades of big-chain bookstores have nudged in...
South Africa: To Tap Votes, Politicians Promise Water ; with Less Than a Month before Elections, Politicians of All Hues Are Pitching the Basic Infrastructure
While US voters are being wooed by presidential hopefuls with promises of lower taxes, better schools, and a sound Social Security system, the pre-election debate here is about nothing so esoteric. South African politicians running in the Dec. 5 local...
Supply and Demand:in Balance ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Along with a lot of other people, I know what it's like to spend the entire day worrying if you'll have everything you need. You wonder if you can pay the rent or mortgage, buy the food, save for the future. If you'll be secure. At the root of this...
The Sky Is Falling - a Little
Remember the story of Chicken Little? She ran around telling everyone the sky was falling. What she should have yelled was "Watch out for rocks from outer space!" That's something that happens all the time. Robert Giegengack, a professor of earth...
Today's Story Line
In the 1990s, about half a million political refugees were admitted into the United States. About half came from Eastern Europe, and one-third came from Asia. How many from Africa, a continent of tremendous ethnic and political strife? About 6 percent....
Trust Flourishes When Students Enforce Their Own Honor Code
In my senior year of high school, I had a class that was taught by one of the most untrusting people I've ever encountered. This teacher would check each student's hands to make sure nobody wrote notes that could help during an exam. I wanted my...
Underage Voting ; Take Civics out of the Textbook and into a Hands-On Campaign, and Apathy Starts to Dissolve
The Gore campaign manager is biting his nails. His candidate won California - a huge victory - but the incoming numbers show Florida, Washington, and, more surprisingly, New York, going to Bush. It's Nov. 2, five days before the national election,...
USA
With the clock counting down the final hours of campaign 2000, the presidential candidates made a series of "last stops" in tossup states that could decide today's election. Al Gore launched a 30- hour-straight swing through Iowa, Missouri, Michigan,...
World
A UN-led protection force that would deploy in the West Bank and Gaza Strip will be demanded by Palestinian Authority leader Yasser Arafat when he meets with President Clinton Thursday, senior aides said. Arafat also is expected to insist that former...