The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 27, 2003

Abortion Protesters Grab a Victory in Court ; the Supreme Court Says a Racketeering Law Can't Be Used to Punish Protesters. It May Spur More Rallies
Anti-abortion protests are not a form of racketeering, even though in many cases they make it difficult or even impossible for women to gain access to abortion clinics.In an 8-to-1 ruling announced Wednesday, the US Supreme Court overturned a civil jury's...
An Almost Familiar Face ; This Mother Wished Her Son Were Different - until He Was
Last year, "The Lovely Bones" made us consider the horror of losing a child. This year, "The Boy on the Bus" will make us confront the terror of keeping one.Where Alice Sebold's bestselling novel moved through the cycles of grief that few parents will...
A Soldier's Life in Afghanistan
The more than 9,000 US troops in Afghanistan are Americans whose lives were changed more than most by Sept. 11. They have been airlifted to a country wracked by war for 30 years, with the weighty responsibility of ensuring it cannot again become a base...
A Well Armed Journalist ; One of the Great Muckrakers Finally Gets the Biography He Deserves
Charles Edward Russell has been dead six decades, but his investigative reporting still reads as if it were published yesterday. The relevance of history has rarely been more obvious than in Russell's words. Robert Miraldi, a journalism professor at...
French Still Attuned to the Rooster's Call ; Porcine Grandeur and Memories of a Peasant Past Bring Hundreds of Thousands to France's Equivalent of a State Fair, Even as Farms Fail
There is something about the sight of a well-built cow that reaches deep into the French soul.How else to explain the pressing crowds of visitors to the annual International Agricultural Show, now under way here, who gawp in admiration at ribbon-bedecked...
Gold Doesn't Glitter in This Rush for Quick Wealth ; Mining Practices in South America Leave a Legacy of Death That Could Last for Centuries
From the depths of an unemployed, snowbound winter in upstate New York, Marc Herman lit out for South America, eager to become the new Hunter Thompson. Herman would walk into the jungle, venture into urban slums, explore lives unimaginable to Americans,...
Go with What You Know ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
A child in my Sunday School class asked me to pray for her mom. When I encouraged her to say a prayer herself, she became nervous and pleaded, "No, you pray. You're better."Seeing that she lacked confidence, I began with what she already knew. At 6 years...
Hearts Heavy, Whites Feeling Driven from Africa
He sits alone in the softly lit room, leaning on mauve cushions and eating cashew nuts out of a glazed coconut shell. His wife and children left three weeks ago, spat on and slapped as they ran to catch the departing plane to Paris."We wanted to stay...
How Bush May Accelerate 401(k) Trends ; Three-Pronged Proposals Extend Shift from Traditional Pensions, Social Security
The Bush administration wants to push Americans into greater self- reliance in looking after their own needs for their retirement years.Social Security would be altered, with a portion of the program looking like a 401(k), involving individual accounts.Corporations...
How I Talked Myself out of Turkish Police Custody
I am deeply concerned when I read of people being arrested because they are in the wrong country, speaking the wrong language, having the wrong religion, or just being in the wrong company. I have some notion of how frightening it can be, because it...
Ideas Wash over Me in the Shower
I've been here before: I'm standing in the shower, eyes closed, water running over my head, unable to recall if I've just washed my hair. In all likelihood I finished rinsing out the soap moments ago, but for some reason I'm incapable of focusing on...
In Turkey, Key Base Preps for US Troops ; Turkey Is Expected to Vote Thursday to Allow More Than 60,000 US Troops on Its Soil
This tidy base, near Turkey's easternmost Mediterranean port, boasts college-campus comforts: American fast-food, a sports bar, and a bowling alley. But its top amenity - a nine-hole golf course - may also prove the most valuable.With Turkey's parliament...
Letters
Bush and Chirac both will need exit strategiesRegarding your Feb. 21 article "Between Bush and Iraq - Jacques Chirac": Jacques Chirac needs an exit strategy? Nonsense. It's President George Bush who lacks an exit strategy. He's painted us into a corner....
Making Nightclubs Safe: The Minneapolis Model
In the days since the Rhode Island and Chicago nightclub tragedies, city officials from Boston to Dallas have ordered squads of fire marshals to crack down on nearly every late-night lair in their cities. It's a high-profile effort to convince people...
Mandates - with Money
The nation's governors met in Washington this week, obviously seeking more aid for their cash-strapped states. But among both Democrats and Republicans, the most common complaint was this: Why doesn't Congress pay for its share of programs that it requires...
Modigliani's Balanced Primitivism
Jean Cocteau hit the nail on the head when he described Amedeo Modigliani's portraits as "not the reflection of his external observation, but of his internal vision...." Today, decades after surrealism made art out of subconscious impulses, this assessment...
New Archbishop Faces Hurdles to Anglican Unity
The first Archbishop of Canterbury was St. Augustine, an African sent to England as a missionary in AD 597 to convert the islanders to Christianity.The 104th Archbishop of Canterbury - who is being enthroned today - is head of the Church of England and...
Not Engaging N. Korea Is like Handing It a Loaded Weapon
Secretary of State Colin Powell's visit to Asia this week follows the latest round in North Korea's spiraling misbehavior - its threat to withdraw from the 1953 armistice that halted the Korean War. Once again, the Bush administration is faced with North...
On Brink of War, Few Exits Remain ; Avenues to Avert a Conflict Exist, but the US Risks Losing Face
When President Bush says Saddam Hussein will be disarmed - with or without war - few people around the world doubt him. It's the "without war" clause that looks less and less likely.Scenarios for accomplishing Iraq's disarmament without the use of force...
Ownership of Genes at Stake in Potential Lawsuit ; A Canadian Province Is Challenging an American Firm's Claim to Human Genes
The genetic test that Teacher Nancy Kumer had two years ago may have saved her life.Ms. Kumer says the test likely prevented her from developing breast cancer, which would have been "a horror." But an international battle is brewing over who owns the...
Palestinians Say Wall Is a Noose ; A 225-Mile Barrier May Make Israelis Safer, but It's Choking the Economy of the Town of Qalqilya
Gray, sleek, and massive, the Israeli security barrier halfway around Qalqilya looks like a wall. But townspeople say the rising concrete serves as a noose, constricting traffic, cutting farmers off from their fields, and choking the local economy."It's...
Perpetrators and Victims Search for Grace ; A Psychologist Reports on the Struggle to Heal South Africa after Decades of Terror
Forgiveness can heal wounded societies. Indeed, victims require forgiveness to become "rehumanized." Those are two of the powerful messages of Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela's moving meditations on her victim-centered work with South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation...
Reporters on the Job
* NAMELESS IN IVORY COAST: The Monitor's Danna Harman arrived in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, just as weeks of street riots against the country's white population stopped. During her 10-day stay, she could feel the tension and fear in the air. But outward signs...
Spring Stargazers Should Watch for 'Bears'
On March 21, the sun climbs north across the celestial equator (actually, Earth dips south on its axis exposing the northern latitudes to more direct rays from the sun). It is the first day of spring!We stargazers, like crocuses pushing up through soil,...
War and Warming: Polemical Blowback
Of all the sources of unintended consequences, war probably is the greatest. The forces set in motion rarely stop where the participants expect. The Civil War helped spawn the large industrial corporation and Jim Crow. World War I gave rise to Hitler,...