The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 24, 2003

Alone on the Range: Texas Ranches and a Vanishing Way of Life
Paul Perner rattles off the names of three families who gave up ranching in Crockett County in the past few years.There's the one who used to run 9,000 sheep, but now depends on oil drilling for income. Another rancher sold all his livestock and now...
Bound to Iraq, Kurds Eye Options ; Violence, Including a Truck Bombing in Kirkuk Last Week, Is Making Kurds Increasingly Wary about Being Part of Iraq
For all the framed bucolic scenes and portraits of stern patriarchs, what dominates Abdulkader Shkak's main-street office in this bustling southern capital of Kurdish Iraq are larger-than-life photos of fluffy yellow chicks.Selling chicks - and the fans...
Britain's Week of Downs, Ups ; Thursday's Bombings in Turkey Were Followed by Saturday's Big Rugby Win
On the murky, hibernal streets of London they don't know whether to laugh or cry.Two spectacular events, both a long way from home - one tragic, one triumphant - have transformed the way Britons feel about their place in the world. The first is inspiring...
Bush's Big Gambit on Medicare ; His Plan May Win the Senate Vote Monday, but It Also Creates a Major New Social Program That Makes Conservatives Squirm
By winning a new prescription-drug benefit for seniors, George W. Bush could recast not only the Medicare program but also his presidency - in a direction that many in his party don't like.The question is whether the gambit will be the decisive victory...
Employees Give Time as Donations Drop
Times are tough for human-service organizations. A weak economy has bloated the list of people in need while squeezing individual donors and government programs. Where else to turn?Think business.At a time when donations from most sources have dwindled,...
Guests Were Blown Away by This Wedding
Lori's wedding day surprised everyone, most of all Lori. No one could have foreseen, even 24 hours earlier, how events would unfold.Plans for the wedding had begun a year before. The ceremony was scheduled at a local synagogue and the reception at a...
How We Warmed to Cold-War Russia
When my employer transferred me from Hong Kong to Moscow at the height of the cold war, I made the move with great trepidation. From my base in Hong Kong, I had covered much of East and Southeast Asia during the preceding seven years, including riots...
In Chaotic New Era, Iraqi Artists Seek Aid
Like many theater people, Basim al-Hajar talks about suffering for his art. But he doesn't mean psychologically.In 1992, Baghdad's fine arts college expelled Mr. Hajar. His crime? After Saddam Hussein's massacre of rebellious Kurds and Shiites, Hajar...
Inside History's Biggest Wildfire Recovery Effort ; Workers in California Clear Ditches to Prevent Mudslides, and Seed Hills to Revive a Landscape
As a safety officer with a wildfire-recovery team, Randy Draeger spends his days making sure workers don't get struck by falling trees, bitten by pit bulls, or run over by bulldozers. But his biggest challenge is preventing exhaustion. Struggling against...
Islamist Turks Still Blame West ; over the Weekend, Protesters Condemned Last Week's Bombings - but Laid Blame on US Policy
While thousands of Turks edged through this city's trendiest districts, glimpsing the devastation left by four deadly bombings last week, thousands of others streamed into mosques in humbler quarters - where the view of the attacks looks markedly different."It...
John Breaux and Bill Frist ; Excerpts from a Monitor Breakfast on Medicare Reform
Sens. John Breaux (D), of Louisiana, and Bill Frist (R), of Tennessee, were Friday's guests.Senator John Breaux graduated from the University of Southwestern Louisiana and then from Louisiana State School of Law. In 1972, at the age of 28, he was elected...
Journaling My Thanks ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
I've started a new journal. People have kept journals throughout the ages, and in the past few years journal-writing has come into vogue again. From personal observation to contemplative essays to a chronology of events, people are recording their thoughts...
Letters
Insufficient funding for No Child Left Behind ActRegarding your Nov. 18 article "A crisis looms for some North Dakota schools": Some rural districts in Alaska are also suffering from the inability to find qualified teachers, as well as the inability...
Making a Difference, One Lollipop at a Time
There was one rule Alberto Mendes couldn't quite get his head around: Don't give candy to the village children. As a poor child in Cape Verde, he, too, had run after grownups visiting from wealthy countries, and he never understood when they just walked...
Michael Jackson Story: Is It Really That Big? ; Saturation Coverage of Singer's Arrest Raises Questions about America's Obsession with Celebrity
When Jeff McCall went channel-surfing the other day, he expected to find updates on President Bush in London, the 34-nation economic summit in Miami, and terror attacks in Turkey.What he found instead, on the top cable news networks, was wall- to-wall,...
Military Gets Break from Environmental Rules ; President Bush Is Expected to Sign a Bill Monday Easing Restrictions on DOD That Deal with Whales and Rare Species
With two wars in two years and the threat of terrorism likely to continue, the US military wants all the help it can get in protecting national security. It is an ideal time, supporters say, to reduce the government regulations that can make it harder...
Peaceful Protest Topples Georgia's President ; Besieged by Thousands of Protesters, Shevardnadze Resigned Yesterday
Tens of thousands of Georgians thronged the streets of this Caucasus nation's capital in jubilation yesterday after President Eduard Shevardnadze announced that he had quit.Bowing to protesters who had stormed parliament declaring a "velvet revolution"...
Reporters on the Job
* NO PEEKING: Monitor writer Howard LaFranchi, newly arrived in the Kurdish Iraqi city of Sulaymaniyah (this page), says he had a hunch why the windows and entrances of some restaurants and sandwich shops were swathed in curtains, but it took his interpreter...
Seeking a Seat on a Charity Board? It's Getting Easier
It used to be only an elite few sat on a charity's board. But with corporate scandals and tight donations, getting involved is getting easier - especially at the top.Charity watchers say more than 3 million board seats are unfilled. That's good news...
Tax the Rich Heirs - and Charities Gain
It's known in some circles as the "death tax." But for many charities and other nonprofit groups it has proved a lifeline.By taxing estates of wealthy people who plan to leave assets to their heirs, the United States encourages them to instead give their...
Thanksgiving Day Proclamation ; US President George W. Bush Proclaims November 27, 2003 a National Day of Thanksgiving
Each year on Thanksgiving, we gather with family and friends to thank God for the many blessings He has given us, and we ask God to continue to guide and watch over our country.Almost 400 years ago, after surviving their first winter at Plymouth, the...
The Birth - and Maturity - of Saturation News Coverage
On Sunday morning, Nov. 24, 1963, at 11:20, television showed the first live, on-air murder. While a horrified press corps looked on, Lee Harvey Oswald, the prime suspect in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, was shot dead. People already...
Tiny Bhutan Aims to Become First Smoke-Free Nation
The next time a smoker bemoans the lack of places to light up, tell them it could be worse. They could be living in Bhutan, a landlocked Buddhist kingdom that's aiming to become the world's first tobacco-free nation.In the capital, Thimphu, nicotine...
Wall Street Repairs
Welcome reforms are afoot at the New York Stock Exchange, the symbolic headquarters of US capitalism whose operations touch most Americans' pocketbooks and nest eggs.The introduction of an eight-person board with directors who are independent of Wall...
Youths Play Old Game of Giving Grants
Nine teenagers from the Rivers School in Weston, Mass., gathered in their cafeteria last Tuesday evening for an unlikely meeting. Munching on pizza, they mulled over the effectiveness of several charities for disabled youths in their community. An adult...