The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 28, 2002

A Housing Boom That Won't Stop ; Home-Buyer Zeal Has Stayed Strong through Recession, Terror, and Interest- Rate Shifts
A husband and wife in Brookline, Mass., put their condominium on the market last weekend for the rarified amount of $495,000. Sure, it was a classic Boston brownstone. But it was also a first-floor residence that sits next to a college dormitory. Within...
A Prayerful Scientist Examines the End ; Physicist Describes Heaven as 'Dynamic'
It is no wonder that John Polkinghorne has just been awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion. To enter his world is to enter a world where contemporary science and traditional Christianity not only converse but make strange and lovely music....
A Teacher Gives Herself a Tough Assignment
As a high school teacher, I was always trying to "build in" student cooperation. Why, then, did I drop something that was seemingly successful? Let me explain. The warm winds of spring had blown across our campus, reminding girls that there were guys...
Building Blocks of Life - in Outer Space
In the early 1950s, a grad student at the University of Chicago zapped simple molecules with artificial lightning to turn simulated seawater into a broth containing amino acids, key building blocks for organic life. Ever since, "primordial soup" has...
China's Sledgehammer Activists ; the Destrucion of Two Mercedes Benzes Brings Consumer Rights to the Fore in China
Mercedes Benz is the No. 1 prestige auto in China: It's the lead car in Chinese weddings, the executives' car of choice. But when four south-China zoo keepers dragged a broken Mercedes into a public square with a water buffalo, then pulverized the car...
Closure. ; Lots of People Are Looking for it.But What Exactly Do They Hope to Find?
Couples need it AFTER a fight. College seniors want it at graduation, even if they don't know it. And laid-off employees could probably do with some of it - on top of severance packages. "It" is closure, and recently it's been on the lips of not only...
Demuth's Portrait of a Poet
This zestful painting by American modernist Charles Demuth has achieved the dubious status of widespread familiarity. It has long been an icon of modern art. But confronted again head-on, "I Saw the Figure Five in Gold" startles you with its potent originality....
Energy-Plan Lesson: Use Task Forces at Peril ; Cheney's Energy Panel Highlight Problem of Trying to Operate Behind Closed Doors
At this very moment, hundreds of task forces, commissions, and advisory groups are quietly imparting their collective wisdom to the Bush administration. Considering everything from who should be awarded a National Science Foundation grant to the future...
In Maluku Islands, Peace Takes Fragile Hold ; Muslims and Christians in Indonesia's Malukus Must Disarm Sunday under Peace Deal
After three years of bloody interfaith conflict, a fragile peace is taking hold in the Indonesian province of Maluku. Word of a recent peace agreement sparked euphoria in the streets of Ambon, the provincial capital, and people are venturing into neighborhoods...
Invisible-Hand Business Ethics
DURING the 1990s' "will-this-ever-stop?" economic boom, the guiding star for policymakers was Adam Smith and his invisible hand of market wisdom. Let the computer chips fall where they may. But now, post-recession and post-Enron, does that wisdom hold...
Kurds Ready to Be Next N. Alliance
High on a spring-green escarpment in northern Iraq, elite Kurdish forces decked out in camouflage and maroon berets are training for the day they hope they realize their dream: helping US forces topple Saddam Hussein. To the southeast, in another part...
Mandela, Back in the Maelstrom ; an Interview with South Africa's Living Legend
In the past four months, Nelson Mandela has made a reluctant political comeback. Already a living legend, the former president - and hero of the antiapartheid movement - has thrust himself back into the rough and tumble of South African politics over...
Nix the Mini-Nukes
The Bush administration's leaked Nuclear Posture Review suggests dramatic and dangerous changes in policy. Congress should reject a key result of it - the request for funds to study a new earth- penetrating nuclear weapon. The review argues that the...
No Homework, No Sports - Just a Night with Family
It's a small, quiet town, set 20 miles fromthe world's most frenetic metropolis - a place where many who reap Manhattan's largess come to raise their kids, away from the furious din of a city driven by success. In many ways, Ridgewood is a town defined...
Numbers Figure Strongly in My Life
This story begins with a number: 64. For eight years, one month, and 20 days, I daily drove approximately that many miles roundtrip to my job as a newspaper reporter. I won't try to fool you: Battling the Chicago area's bumper-to-bumper traffic will...
Rethinking Religious Tolerance ; Respect for Different Traditions Butts Up against Concern about Their Views on Women
As a working mother and local activist in Newburyport, Mass., Amantha Moore says her heart breaks every time she hears how women suffer in Afghanistan. But when she heard a recent radio news report about American women in Afghanistan urging local women...
Rock 'N' Roll Will Never Die, but Has It Sold out? ; the Insider Scoop on Warner Bros. Records - before Cash Was King
Stan Cornyn's rich history of a key pop music conglomerate is one of the few books to make sense of this complex field. It begins in the '30s on vinyl 78s, with Warner Brothers' first label, Brunswick. It ends in 1999, when Time Warner released compact...
Saudi Plan Buffeted, Still Afloat ; despite Dramatic Dissent at the Arab Summit Yesterday, a Saudi Peace Plan Is Still Expected to Pass
This gathering of the Arab world's leaders was supposed to send a message to Israel that Arab nations are united behind a Saudi peace initiative. The Beirut summit got off to a bumpy start. But the last-minute no-shows of three key leaders, a walkout...
Scandals Will Dent, Not Bankrupt, Dioceses ; Roman Catholic Church Faces Big Financial Toll from Lawsuits and Lost Donations. but Its Resources Are Vast
Dozens of priests are sacked over child-abuse accusations. New lawsuits worth millions are filed as previously unknown victims phone lawyers. Irate parishioners from Boston to Palm Beach chop donations to avoid paying for huge settlements. "Now that...
Science Notes
Rare comet - Catch it while you can Wait around long enough after a spectacular spring sunset, and you're likely to see another wonder in the night sky: comet Ikeya- Zhang, which hangs low in the west as twilight fades. Ikeya-Zhang last appeared in 1661,...
Slave Reparations Are Unlikely, but Lawsuit May Prod Companies ; the Class-Action Suit Filed Tuesday Could Nudge Embarrassed Corporations into Voluntarily Paying Up
In the 1850s, Aetna insured slaveholders against the death of their human property, and the predecessors of the CSX rail company used slaves to build their tracks. At the time, it was just ordinary business in antebellum America. But those practices...
Till Death - or Whatever - Do Us Part ; One of America's Most Insightful Social Critics Laments the Condition of the Modern Family
Handwringing over the troubled state of the family has been elevated to an art form during the past decade. In book after book, critics ranging from sociologists and politicians to economists and religious leaders have chronicled what happens when the...
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