The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 27, 2003

A 1982 Israeli War Has Modern Echoes for US in Iraq
The parallels between the US-led invasion of Iraq and Israel's invasion of Lebanon 21 years ago are striking - and ominous.Both involved modern armies invading initially through Shiite Muslim-dominated areas. Both armies also expected no opposition from...
All of My Backyard's a Stage Thanks to a Full Bird Feeder
About six feet from my kitchen window hangs a green metal bird feeder. I fill it every morning as the eastern sky pales and rosy rays seep through thin clouds. Because I removed the plexiglass panel a few years back, the feeder serves as a covered way...
An Iraqi Love Feast Spiced with Despair ; A Culinary Romance Set in a Middle Eastern Cafe
Xiana Abu-Jaber couldn't have imagined that we'd be reading her lush romance about lonely Iraqis by the light of Baghdad burning. Her publisher must be nervous about the political climate, but it's refreshing to see Iraqis outside "the axis of evil."...
Asking Better Questions ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
The headlines reported the crash of a small plane in western Massachusetts. The story mentioned the weather as a possible cause of the crash. As I read the article, I asked, "Why would someone travel in bad weather?"I immediately realized that wasn't...
Baby Case Tests Rights of Parents ; Texas Court Weighs Case of Hospital That Overrode Parents to Perform Operation
It was the hardest decision they have ever had to make. When Karla Miller raced to a Houston hospital with labor pains, little more than five months pregnant, she and her husband, Mark, were told that despite efforts to delay delivery, their first child...
'Bad' Books Hidden under the Veil of Revolution ; Iranian Women Resist Oppression by Reading Forbidden Novels
Azar Nafisi's memoir makes a good case for reading the classics of Western literature no matter where you are. Rich with the author's memories of teaching English during the Islamic revolution that shook her country, "Reading Lolita in Tehran" provides...
Bush and Blair: Different Postwar Visions ; the US and British Leaders Meet for Talks on Iraq at Camp David Thursday
When Prime Minister Tony Blair compares notes with President Bush at Camp David Thursday on their war in Iraq, their jottings may bear little resemblance to each other.In their first week of war, US and British troops have been engaged in completely...
Carrier Sails in a Sea of Conflict ; with Tensions Up in Korea, USS Carl Vinson's Patrol Takes on Greater Significance
Zig-zagging through blue-green waters, this Nimitz-class carrier, the USS Carl Vinson, simulates wartime off the coast of Korea.Jets, mainly F-18s, shake the ship 120 times a day, catapulting from zero to 300 mph in seconds. Pilots with call-signs like...
Drama Unfolds in the Life of a Burlesque Theater
The crumbling embossed letters over the doorway announce that a playhouse must have once flourished here. But it takes a sharp eye to find the words "Gaiety Theater." The building, on a run-down block in downtown Boston, long ago lost its marquee and...
E-Mail and TV: Lifelines for Military Spouses ; Husbands and Wives of Soldiers Keep a Low Profile, Leaning on Family and Anxiously Monitoring News
Frances Sacca recently received an e-mail from her husband, Master Sgt. Joe Sacca, who's a 35-year Air Force veteran. He mentioned how bad the coffee is in Kuwait. So she immediately fired off a care package that included four pounds of Joe's favorite...
I'll Remain Cellphone Free, with Glee
When I looked up from the menu and realized that both twins and my wife had cellphones to their ears, I began to fear for my powers of conversation. Why was the prospect of speaking to someone they could neither see nor, in most cases, hear, so much...
Images That Shock and Provoke ; Pictures of Violence and Suffering Endure a Multitude of Uses
One of the points Susan Sontag maintains in this pithy yet still rather diffusively argued book is that if we are "perennially surprised" at the appalling cruelties humans inflict on each other, then we have "not reached moral or psychological adulthood."...
Interviews of US Iraqis: Outreach or Overreach? ; with New Data-Gathering on Expatriates, FBI Steps Up Antiterror Efforts - but May Intensify Immigrants' Fears
The questions go like this: Do you support Saddam Hussein? Do you know any Saddam sympathizers? What is your religious affiliation? What are the names and addresses of your Iraqi family members living in the United States?While Americans catch up on...
Iraqis Opt for Delay as Defense ; US Officials Insist They're on Target, but American Troops Face Hurdles as Hussein's Troops Move South of Baghdad
One week into war with Iraq, US commanders and their civilian overseers are seeing as much sniping off the battlefield as they are in the Iraqi desert.Critics - including prominent retired generals - want to know why Saddam Hussein appears to remain...
Lessons on How to Oust Hussein ; Kurds Who Fought in the 1991 Uprising Say Involving Them and Encouraging Civilian Revolts Are Key
Kurdish strategist Noshirwan Mustafa, standing at a conference table in his book-lined study, points out Iraqi troop deployments marked in red on a glassed-over map of the country.He traces with his finger the arc of the US-led advance toward Baghdad,...
Letters
Graphic war images should not be censoredRegarding the March 25 opinion piece "War isn't pretty, nor is news of it": I appreciate your analysis of the pros and cons of showing graphic photos of war casualties. I support having the US press publish such...
Measure for Measure, the Kilogram Doesn't Square Up
As spring arrives, the National Institute of Standards and Technology urges us to "hug a weights and measures official." That's not as quixotic as it might seem.These officials make sure that a pound of potatoes is a pound of potatoes and a quart of...
Military Occupations - the Good, Bad, and Ugly
War is always an unpredictable, tragic undertaking. We cannot foresee the future course of the US-led campaign against Iraq, though we know that people are already being killed, maimed, and traumatized because of it. What we can foretell with some degree...
Noah's Ark Governance in North Carolina: Two House Speakers ; Noth Carolina's Speakers Trade a Gavel - and Try to Put Partisan Quarrels Aside - in the Latest Adventures in Powersharing
The first quandary for the two men in charge of North Carolina's statehouse, isn't how to handle the budget or Medicare. It's who gets the prize parking spot. And it only gets harder. With one gavel, two speakers, and a shortage of posh offices, the...
Of Prison and Publishing - and Who Should Profit
Prison made a convert of Malcolm X, but the Massachusetts Department of Corrections never got credit for his vital role in the Nation of Islam. Prison made a letter writer of the apostle Paul, but Rome missed out on royalties for his correspondence with...
One War, Two Battles
A dominating first-week effort by coalition forces confirms that allied military strength is unrivaled. And despite pockets of stiff resistance, US Central Command officers insist the campaign will continue to be waged on "our terms."But as US-led convoys...
Reporters on the Job
* SEATS UPRIGHT, TRAY TABLES LOCKThe Monitor's Robert Marquand says he knew aircraft carriers were big. But it wasn't till he and several other journalists visited the USS Carl Vinson (page 9), which is participating in US-South Korean exercises, that...
Staying in the Loop, with Hoops
On Dec. 30, 1936, 13 days prior to my birth, Hank Luisetti introduced the running one-handed basketball shot at Madison Square Garden while playing for Stanford. At the time, everyone else was shooting two-handed set shots or hook shots.I am an admirer...
The Next Face of Iraq ; How a Former US General Can Jump-Start a Nation
Waiting patiently in Kuwait for the collapse of Saddam Hussein's regime is an American official who would replace him.John Garner, a former Army general from the 1991 Gulf War, has been piecing together an "Interim Iraqi Administration," which will have...
Urban Warfare: Advantage US
Now, as the main battle in Iraq moves toward a conclusion near or in Baghdad, the specter that concerned Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld and his generals before the war - a bloody fight between US troops and the remnants of the Iraqi forces inside an urban...
US-Turkey Tensions Ease amid Signs of Greater Collaboration ; Military Chief Says Turkey Will Send More Troops into N. Iraq Only If Threat Escalates - and in Coordination with US
Turkey's top military chief said yesterday that Turkey was actively preparing to send more troops into northern Iraq, but that it would do so only if the threat against Turkey escalates - and in coordination with the United States.The comments by Gen....
Watering Eden ; the Mesopotamian Marshlands of Iraq, Long a Vital Ecological Oasis in a Parched Land, Have Shrunk to a Tenth Their Expanse 10 Years Ago. Several International Groups Are Weighing Options to Restore the Wetlands Once the War Is Over
For millenniums, thousands of square miles of lush marshes have anchored the eastern end of the Fertile Crescent - the cradle of Western civilization that arced up along the eastern Mediterranean coast, across northern Syria, and down along the Tigris...
What If the Majority Freely Votes for Tyranny? ; Limits on the Reach of Democratic Rule Are Essential to Maintain Liberty
Every student knows that ancient Athens was the alpha and omega of classical democracy. All laws were passed by popular vote.More to the point, the majority held absolute power over citizens individually, an authority exercised to the fullest when the...
Why Stock Market Shifts in Sync with War in Iraq ; Nonstop Coverage and Weak Economy Tie Wall Street Swings More Than Ever to War
Military commanders talk about the "fog of war." On Wall Street, the war has resulted in a fog for investments as economic news is now secondary to battlefield developments on the Iraqi sands.The emphasis on war news now means that stock traders look...
Why US Getting a Wary Welcome ; as US Forces Fight in Southern Iraq, the Shifting Loyalties of Civilians Could Be Key
Through the fog of war in Iraq, one conclusion is emerging. The "rose petal and rice" scenario, under which Washington optimists envisaged a warm and immediate welcome for US and British troops, was mistaken.Reporters with combat troops have recounted...
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