The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 19, 2002

A Legal Tool Emerges in Terror War ; Federal Officials Are Taking Terror Suspects into Custody under the Material-Witness Law
When alleged "dirty bomb" plotter Jose Padilla arrived in the US, federal agents took him into custody with all the precision of a Swiss watch. It was not a last-minute operation. Mr. Padilla, a US citizen, had been a prime target of investigators for...
A Step toward School Choice, Ready or Not ; Bush Officials Want to Help Parents Pull Laggard Kids out of 'Failing' Schools This Fall
The Bush administration, eager to make its mark on the high- profile issue of education, is moving faster on key reforms than many schools feel they can cope with. Most significantly, by this fall schools will have to help many students exit so-called...
Bag Your Own: Service without a Smile
A LARGE SIGN hanging above a new checkout lane at Shaw's supermarket in Braintree, Mass., tells a story of modern innovation."Self Checkout," the sign announces. "Scan, Bag & Pay on Your Own. 15 Items or Less. It's Quick and Easy!" No more waiting in...
Bamboo Shows off, and Behaves
Bamboos are among the most versatile plants in our gardens. They are at home in the serene green of Japanese gardens as well as in colorful tropical gardens that call to mind Mexico, Jamaica, and Bali. Bamboos come in so many shapes and sizes that they...
Brunch Served with Style
When designing a stylish summer brunch, let your individuality shine through in every detail. The food, the table setting, the service, and the ambience should all reflect your creativity and taste. This is easier than you think. Begin by creating a...
China Wrestles an Online Dragon ; China Is Shutting Down Beijing's Internet Cafes after a Fire That Killed 24 People Earlier This Week
China's leaders are launching a nationwide crackdown on unregistered Internet cafes, following a fire on Sunday that killed 24 people in Beijing. But as police move to shutter as many as 2,400 cafes in the nation's capital, young Chinese are asking why...
Everyone Needs a Way to Sway
I lay on my cruise-ship bunk in a rolling sea near the tip of South America and remembered hammocks. Hammocks ride up-down-up-down-up; there's a pause at the end of each upswing. The difference, I decided, is that the ship's bunk had a reverse ride:...
For New Recruits, Summer of Baptism by Fire
In the epic struggle this summer between humans and nature, Anna Moody may be one of the nation's best hopes of keeping the flint- dry American West from burning down. At 22, Ms. Moody represents the next generation of federal firefighters - young pyro-warriors...
General Motors: Back in High Gear ; the Onetime Industry King and Erstwhile Fuddy-Duddy Takes Back the Road, with Retro-Chic Designs
On a recent afternoon in the middle of a downtown food court here, people were doing what they often do in this city. They were looking at cars. Corvettes, to be exact - a string of Corvettes covering the 50 years the vehicle has been in production,...
Getting to the Root of the Vegetable
How well do you know your veggies? Read the descriptions below and see if you can identify the edible plant by its history or the origin of its name (its etymology). (And no dessert until you've finished your vegetable quiz....) 1. This small, crisp...
Growing Tomatoes and Hope
I planted tomatoes last weekend. On the face of it, that was a silly thing to do. A city resident, I don't have a real garden, just a patio with large flowerpots. Besides, it will be the middle of August - probably much later - before my tiny plants...
In Business of Sport, US One of Less-Free Markets
Behind the upstart US soccer team's unexpected success in the World Cup lie two surprises. The first is that they are still in the competition at all. By reaching Friday's quarterfinals for the first time in 72 years, Claudio Reyna and his teammates...
Involve US Citizens in Homeland Security
Why is the government of the most technologically advanced nation in the world lagging in its computer technology to catch threatening terrorists? FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III tells us his agency is hopelessly behind the times in its communications...
Israel's Tragedy, Arafat's Setback ; Tuesday's Bomb in Jerusalem Comes on the Eve of a Major Bush Mideast Policy Speech
For Israelis, Tuesday's bus bombing was a landmark atrocity. For the Palestinian Authority, it also promises to be devastating, but for very different reasons. It was one of the worst of the scores of Palestinian suicide attacks in nearly two years of...
Letters
When is an American not an American? Regarding "A new nationalism on the rise" (June 11): I was distressed to read that more Americans are now emphasizing what they think is their "commonality" rather than using terms like Irish- American to denote ethnic...
More Than Child's Play ; How Do Divorced Dads Find Ways to Entertain Their Children without Breaking the Budget or Going Overboard?
Every other Friday at 4 p.m., Mike McCormick climbs into his Plymouth Voyager, pulls out of his driveway in Sterling, Va., and heads north on an important family mission: picking up his 6-year- old son, Jimmy, for a weekend visit. His destination, 180...
Preserving a Way of Light
The last line of the accomplishments listed by the town manager in this year's report reads: "Brought 30 large elm trees over 100 miles to supplement our stock." When I read it, I flashed back to the day in October when Joe Slocum, the town manager,...
Soccer Minnows Are Devouring the Favored Fish ; South Korea Upset No. 5 Ranked Italy in the World Cup Yesterday. Why? the Home-Field Factor
Soccer's mighty are falling, one after another. France. Portugal. Argentina. And now Italy. Korea's stunning victory yesterday over No. 5 seeded Italy is yet another sign that nothing can be taken for granted in the 2002 World Cup finals. In terms of...
'Soft Money' Ban Hinges on Obscure Agency ; Partisan Fighting Aside, FEC Vote Today Is Likely to Keep Campaign- Finance Reform Intact
One is a former Defense undersecretary who is a proponent of home schooling. Another is a former healthcare consultant who served as US vice consul in Ecuador. A third was a lawyer for President Bush's 2000 campaign and Bob Dole's 1996 run. The six members...
Trouble on Sesame Street
PBS is chasing two stars but having trouble catching either. One star is its usual fare of innovative programs, like a Ken Burns series, long expected of the Public Broadcasting System. The other is mass appeal, higher ratings, and greater viewer donations....
Where Are the US Soccer Fans?
The US men's soccer team deserves the heartiest of congratulations for defeating Mexico and advancing to the quarterfinals of the World Cup. But at the risk of rankling the team's few true supporters (plus the soon-to-be-crowded bandwagon), let me offer...
Young 'Super Mario' Shakes Up Canadian Politics ; Monday, an Upstart Right-of-Center Party in Quebec Won Three of the Four By-Elections
Monday's by-elections in Quebec, in which three of the four seats were won by the relatively new, right-of-center Action Democratique du Quebec (ADQ), may signal a new era in the province's politics - including an end to the separatist movement that...
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