The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 8, 2002

5,000 Watts of Pure Stereo Nostalgia ; There's Nothing Small about These Small Town Lives
Fannie Flagg, the queen of fried green tomatoes and small town farce, comes on like a thunder storm of sentimental humor. You can run for cover under the awning of Great Literature, you can put up an umbrella of sophisticated disdain, but it's no use:...
A Garden Helps to Raise My Son
I have long maintained a small but intense flower garden on the incline of the riverbank behind my home in Maine. Dwarf cranberry, bee balm, creeping phlox, and a variety of sedums have all done well there, soaking up the eastern sun at break of day...
Bad Air Days ; A Different Kind of Detective Is Closing in on the Complex Causes of and Some Possible Solutions for Those Smoggy Summer Skies
It's the kind of sultry, late July day that drives tourists and locals to the beach for a cool ocean dip. But for atmospheric scientists aboard the research vessel Ronald H. Brown, the day is just what they've been looking for: ideal for cooking up smog....
Bin Laden's Innovations
The hunt for terrorists in Afghanistan is winding down. American troops now go days at a time without finding Al Qaeda fighters. Disappeared, too, is their leader, Osama bin Laden. Even if military operations end in Afghanistan, it is too soon to dismiss...
Blowin' in the 9/11 Wind
Bob Dylan played at the Newport Folk Festival last Saturday. It took 37 years for the legendary lyricist to return to this national nursery of 1960s social- protest music. But more remarkable than his historic homecoming in Rhode Island was what he didn'tdo....
Brazil Shares AIDS-Fight Blueprint ; Brazil Said Last Week It Will Take Its Model for Generic Drugs to Portuguese-Speaking Nations
Brazil's much lauded AIDS-fighting program is going global. Last week, leaders from Portuguese-speaking countries signed on to a program to share in the know-how that has cut Brazil's AIDS- related deaths by more than half over the past eight years....
Fast-Food Restaurants Face Legal Grilling ; Lawyers Explore Whether the Fast-Food Industry Should Be Liable for the Effect Its Meals and Marketing Have on Public Health
For decades, Caesar Barber ate hamburgers four or five times a week at his favorite fast-food restaurants, visits that didn't end even after his first heart attack. But his appetite for fast food didn't stop Mr. Barber, who is 5 foot 10 and weighs 272...
Heart of a Suburb: The Postmodern Dump
On a recent Saturday afternoon a white convertible sprouting an almost inconceivable quantity of leafy tree branches passed along Central Avenue here like a Fourth of July float of Big Bird's nest. The driver, all but invisible, was headed into the Needham...
Honey, What's on the Fish Tank Tonight?
This January, my husband and I returned to the United States after four years in Japan. We were thrilled to be back within nonstop flying distance of family and friends, and - given my husband's fanaticism for any professional sports team from Boston...
How Can Free People Fight Terror?
In a month, we will mark the first anniversary of the events that shattered a myriad of illusions about our national security. The commandeered airplanes that crashed into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were not only direct hits on iconic buildings...
In Africa, New Enemy of Graft ; Zambia Takes on Ex-President in the Biggest Anticorruption Drive since Independence
At the Jordan Inn, a small cafe in a dusty settlement 10 miles outside Lusaka, nearly everyone has strong feelings about Zambia's former President Frederick Chiluba. "He's a thief," shouts Lameck Make, a local butcher. "He should go to jail." "We should...
Letters
When Arabs once admired America Richard C. Hottelet writes of a new agency "to peddle goodwill toward America," and notes it is "more likely to become a laughing stock, cheapening the message of a great country" ("Stop being a lone ranger on Iraq," Opinion,...
New Leader of Afghan Democrats Can Also Fix Teeth
Less than a year ago, Zabir Nasiri was busy filling teeth at his dental clinic in Kandahar, the Taliban stronghold in southern Afghanistan. A skilled and respected practitioner from a prominent local family, Mr. Nasiri sometimes found himself elbow-deep...
One 9th Circuit Appeals Court, under God? ; the Nation's Biggest - and Most Controversial - Federal Court May Be Split Up
When a three-judge panel of the US Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals recently declared the Pledge of Allegiance unconstitutional because it includes the phrase "under God," it set off an immediate explosion of patriotism and religiosity. But it also brought...
Portugal Assesses Its Softer Approach to Drug Users ; A Year Ago Lisbon Decriminalized Drug Use. Views Differ on Whether the Policy Is Effective
In the shadowy labyrinth of cobblestone streets around this port city's 12-century Se cathedral, heroin addicts have long been selling drugs and shooting up. Police had hoped that the narcotics-infested neighborhood would change after Portugal's decision...
Putting a Literary Lens on Motherhood
Three years ago, new moms Jennifer Niesslein and Stephanie Wilkinson decided over coffee that having a baby didn't necessarily mean losing all intellectual stimulation. The result was Brain, Child, which bills itself as "the magazine for thinking mothers."...
Rumors of Extinction Somewhat Exaggerated ; Now and Then, Written-Off Animals Come Back from the Beyond
In "The Ghost With Trembling Wings," Scott Weidensaul lives the dream of many birders. He searches the humid mountains of St. Lucia for the small, drab Semper's warbler - presumably extinct but perhaps overlooked. He braves the mosquitoes, snakes, heat,...
Scenarios Narrow for Attacking Iraq ; the Pattern Emerging from Leaks and Visible US Military Build-Up in the Region Is a Middle-Road Gulf War Lite
In recent months they've been pouring a lot of concrete at the al Udeid air base in Qatar. The giant facility - used by US Air Force units - has added a 13,000-foot runway, as well as ammunition dumps and a tent city able to house thousands of troops....
So Many Documents, So Little Staff ; Committee at the Forefront of Largest-Ever Congressional Probe of Corporate America Pursues Its Task with Bipartisan Zeal
No one stands still very long in the basement offices of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations - it's too easy to be trapped against a wall by incoming boxes of documents tied to the collapse of Enron Corp. For a time, the subpoenaed documents...
The Clean-Plate Club Loosens Its Belt
As a child, I was skilled at shuffling food around my plate and hiding sad-looking green things behind lamb chop barricades. The ruse rarely worked, and a mouthful or two was usually required before dessert appeared. My British father was a long-standing...
The People Equation
"We are inside a bottleneck of overpopulation and wasteful consumption," maintains eminent Harvard biologist Edward O. Wilson. In his critically acclaimed book "The Future of Life," Mr. Wilson observes that the world is now engaged in a race between...
Unflinching Attention to the Real Self ; A Survey of the Earliest Western Philosophers
Pierre Hadot is determined to change our view of ancient philosophy, and by extension, of philosophy as a discipline. In his new book, the professor emeritus at College de France writes, "The university tends to make the philosophy professor a civil...
Wind Flows Tear at Ozone Layer
Climate change is giving scientists a new perspective on Northern Hemisphere ozone depletion. Ozone chemist Neil Harris says "it's now clear" that shifts in large-scale wind flows dilute the stratosphere's ozone and open mini ozone holes at northern...
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